Tag: Italian History

Melbourne Masterclass: Senses of Italy

Melbourne Masterclass: Senses of Italy Thursdays, 5, 12, 19 & 26 October and 2 November, 2017, 6.15pm-8.15pm ‘All our knowledge begins with the senses…’ (Immanuel Kant). The Faculty of Arts brings together scholars working in the field of Italian studies to present this series of evening lectures exploring the notion of ‘what is Italian’, through an historical journey of the five senses: scent, sight, sound, taste, and touch. Held over five consecutive weeks this program brings to life aspects of Italian culture, history, art, film, literature, music, and food of significant moments throughout Italian history. Learn about the history of perfumes and engage in an interactive session sampling and receiving perfumes from Aquaflor, a Florentine perfume house presented by international olfactory specialist Dr Antonio Artese from Italy. Uncover the hidden identity of one of our beloved Iocal Italian paintings with…

Lecture | Pat Simons ‘The Crone, the Witch and the Library in Renaissance Italy’

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The Crone, the Witch and the Library in Renaissance Italy Professor Pat Simons, University of Michigan This paper examines ways in which renewed attention to antiquity during the Renaissance re-invigorated misogynist stereotypes of old women as well as bringing new evidence to the emerging discourse about witches, hence shaping for the hag a vivid pictorial presence. Proof for the threatening female figure was drawn from the humanist’s library of classical authors, many cited in Giovanfrancesco Pico della Mirandola’s Stryx (1523), which stated that witches were ‘ancient in essence and new in accidents.’ Late medieval depictions of the crone were amalgamated with classical precedents to produce new or revised images such as the personification of Envy, which is a focus here, since Pico claimed it was the core motivation for demons. However, not all witches were conflated with the image of…

Lecture | Charting Cultural Transformation through Renaissance Preaching – Peter Howard

Charting Cultural Transformation through Renaissance Preaching Associate Professor Peter Howard from Monash University   How did the artists of the Sistine Chapel wall frescoes develop and execute a complex programme in an amazingly short period of time? How do we explain the configuration of public space in early Renaissance Italy? Who authorised the magnificent display that characterises Renaissance Florence? These are just some of the questions on which light is shed if an expansive role is assigned to preaching in late medieval and early Renaissance Italy. This argument is a reversal of the image of the mendicant “penitential preachers” that Burckhardt constructed a century and a half ago but that still prevails, even among some scholars. Most commonly, the historiography identifies the humanists as the innovators of the day and as the disseminators of a renewed classical culture. This can…