Tag: Call for Papers

Call for Papers and Performances – The Magic Lantern in Australia and the World: An Interdisciplinary Conference | Canberra, September 2018

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: 30 MARCH 2018 4-6 September 2018 | ANU School of Art & Design, Canberra Contact: elisa.decourcy@anu.edu.au Affect / Animation / Aparatuses & Technology /  Cinema / Digital Humanities /Entertainment / Evangelism / Exploration / Globalisation & Trade / Heritage Studies Media Archaeology / Performance & Reenactment / Photography / Illusion, Optics & Phantasmagoria / Science Communication / Missionary Histories From its development in the colonial period, to its echoes in today’s multimedia spaces, the magic lantern, along with its thousands of photographic and hand-painted slides, has had a pervasive and lasting impact on visual culture. Historians are just discovering its powerful presence in entertainment, education, science, religion, politics and advertising. Galleries, libraries and archives are uncovering untouched caches of slides in their collections. And artists and performers are rekindling the ‘magic’ of the technology. The Australian Research…

Call for papers: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art, Issue 2, 2018

Due to high demand, we’re pleased to announce that we will be publishing a second open issue of the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Art in 2018. Issue 2 for 2018 will be edited by Associate Professor Ann Elias, History and Theory of Contemporary Global Art, and Dr Stephen H. Whiteman, Senior Lecturer in Asian Art, both of the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney. The editors seek research papers that engage with critical debates and scholarly frameworks across art-historical and theoretical enquiry within local and global contexts, plus review essays evaluating publications and exhibitions. Articles must be between 5,000 and 7,000 words (including endnotes) and should be suitable for a scholarly peer-reviewed journal. See the ANZJA submission guidelines here for further details. Submissions not conforming to the guidelines will not be considered. Papers, biographical information…

Call for Papers | Making Art (History) since John Berger (Lausanne, 11-12 Oct 2018)

Lausanne, Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), October 11 – 12, 2018 Deadline: Feb 15, 2018 From B to X. Making Art (History) since John Berger International symposium organised by the Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA, Lausanne and Zurich), the Musée de l’Elysée (Lausanne), and the Universität Bern The first episode of Ways of Seeing, the 1970s television series broadcast by the BBC, opens with a long take in which the presenter, British writer, artist, and art critic John Berger (1926-2017), cuts up Venus and Mars (1483), a painting by Sandro Botticelli that is housed at the National Gallery in London. In the very opening images of the film Berger cuts out the head of Venus and later lays it out flat on a stack of photographic prints. Surprising, worthy of a vandal, and unexpected within the context of the museum,…

CFP | Risk Anything!’: Modernist Women between Centre and Periphery | UNSW April 2018

A symposium presented by the Australasian Modernist Studies Network Friday 6 April 2018, University of New South Wales Keynote: A/Prof Natalya Lusty (The University of Sydney) “Risk! Risk anything! Care no more for the opinions of others, for those voices. Do the hardest thing on earth for you. Act for yourself. Face the truth.” The peripatetic New Zealand modernist Katherine Mansfield wrote these words towards the end of her life, urging herself to be courageous, to pursue her creative convictions. Mansfield’s approach to life and work is an example of the countless creative women who embraced, employed and drove the modernist cultural experiment. Nearly a century later, our own era is equally defined by contingency and risk, offering a unique opportunity to reflect on the history and legacies of creative behaviour that defines itself in terms of risk. We invite…

Call for Papers | Frenemies: Friendship, Enmity and Rivalry in British art 1769-2018 | Paul Mellon Centre

An International Conference, 19th – 20th July 2018, Paul Mellon Centre Website: http://www.paul-mellon-centre.ac.uk/whats-on/forthcoming/frenemies Deadline 5pm 14 December 2017 From the earliest histories of art, the friendships and rivalries of artists have been the subject of anecdote and gossip. For that reason they have been associated with the popular storylines of art, rather than with the scholarly discourse of art history. However, the wide-ranging re-evaluation of affect and emotion that is taking place in the humanities, and the increasing recognition of a synchronic, network model of understanding rather than a diachronic, emulative one in art history, have served to suggest that artistic friendships and rivalries are key agents in the production and reception of works of art. This methodological shift has helped art historians perceive the significance of interpersonal relationships to art-making. It has drawn attention to the sociability of artists, and…

Call for Papers | Artium Quaestiones, issue: Work of Art as a Thing

Deadline: Nov 5, 2017 Artium Quaestiones, issue 29: Work of Art as a Thing After a long period of fascination with semiotics, textuality, visual culture and – generally – with images, since the late 20th century scholars of art have been more and more often focusing on the materiality of an artwork. They tend to think about it as a physical object or – the distinction is of importance here – a thing. This tendency – conspicuous in many academic disciplines – from archeology to philosophy, museum studies, sociology or anthropology – is variously described as a ‘material turn’, ‘return to things’ or ‘thinking through things’. Its premises are related to a special kind of neo-positivist, empirical and science-based scholarly attitude and an attempt to overcome the humanist, anthropocentric orientation onto the world in favour of objects surrounding or rather…

CFP | Architectural Histories: Digital Architectural History (2018)

Deadline: Oct 1, 2017 For a “Special Collection on Digital Architectural History”, Architectural Histories, the open access journal of the EAHN, in collaboration with the Institute for the History and Theory of architecture at the ETH Zürich (gta), seeks proposals for contributions that set a new benchmark in digital publication in the field of the history of architecture and the built environment. The journal intends to offer a platform for articles that explore what a durable and truly digital architectural history could look like. Such history activates various forms of digital visualization, data collection and management, and digital research tools; it questions how these new means affect and shape the work of the historian; and it examines how this work is made available for assessment, consultation and debate. The aim of the issue is to arrive at accessible, sustainable and…

Call for Papers | Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art Open Issue 1 – 2018

Issue 1, 2018 Open Issue Issue editors: Professor Deborah Ascher Barnstone, (University of Technology, Sydney), and Dr Donna West Brett (University of Sydney). Journal aims and scope The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art (ANZJA) is published by the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). AAANZ is Australia’s professional body for art and design historians, arts writers, artists, students of art history and theory, and museum professionals. The journal is Australasia’s principal refereed art history journal. ANZJA is dedicated to the study of art history and its various emanations including art practice, theory and exhibition. The editors seek research papers that engage with critical debates and frameworks across art-historical and theoretical enquiry within local and global contexts, plus review essays evaluating publications and exhibitions. Articles must be between 5,000 and 7,000 words (including endnotes) and should be…

Call for Submissions | Art and Herbarium – Journal issue

Issue 3: Art and Herbarium Guest Editors: Danielle Wyatt and Thomas Bristow   ART AND HERBARIUM: CREATIVE ECOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS Herbaria and natural history archives must be more than repositories for artifacts and scientific information. Curators of these collections are aware that while the archives have always been invested with human passions, natural collections are now laden with distinctly contemporary affect as ‘nature’ comes under threat from global challenges like species extinction, habitat loss and the impacts of man-made climate change. While natural collections institutions aim to improve our ecological futures through scientific research, it is clear that ecological literacy also requires involving diverse publics in more embodied, empathetic and ethical relationships with the natural systems that sustain our life on this planet. Creative Ecological Investigations #1 (CEI#1) is an art project placing a multidisciplinary selection of artists in contact with…

CFP | Women in the Creative Arts | August 2017 at ANU

Women in the Creative Arts | 10-12 August 2017 | Australian National University The School of Music at the Australian National University, is pleased to announce a call for papers and submissions for an innovative research conference on “Women in the Creative Arts” to be held at the school from 10-12 August, 2017. Papers and proposals are invited from scholars and industry practitioners from the creative arts. The topical focus for this conference is the creative work of artists who identify as women. Delegates of all gender identities are invited to submit proposals for papers. Research papers will receive 30 minutes of presentation time – papers should be presented within 20 minutes, allowing 10 minutes for questions. Submissions are also invited for poster presentations, seminar panels, roundtable presentations, networking events, or creative workshops that might be of interest to delegates in this…

Call for Papers | Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories | Sydney October 2017

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories | An international symposium hosted by the Power Institute, University of Sydney, Australia, 11–13 October 2017 Proposals due 28 February 2017 Studies focused on gender in Southeast Asian societies have emerged, in recent decades, in approximate concurrence with the development of regionally focused Southeast Asian art histories. The founding premise of this international symposium is that there has hitherto been insufficient discursive intersection between these two fields. Topics discussed may include: 1. Accounts of individual artists and collectives whose work engages with gender; 2. Investigations of gender in the exhibitionary, critical, and historiographical receptions of works of art, from any period 3. Considerations of the relationships between artists and/or works of art and larger Southeast Asian cultural constructs of gender, as enacted in political, economic, religious and other domains. Proposals will be particularly welcomed for papers…

Symposium | Agency and aesthetics: A symposium on the expanded field of photography | Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki

With more photographs circulating than ever before, what do photographers want their images to do? How are artists retaining agency amongst the changing ontology of photography and its conventions and technologies? Does photography either in an art gallery or online still offer a democratic potential in its ability to alter or resist existing positions? As part of considering the shifting politics and aesthetics of photography the event is an opportunity to consider the current nature of subjectivity in image worlds. If the selfie is the “the first format of the new global majority” as Niholas Mirzoeff has stated, how has it continued to be an argument about who a person is and what they stand for? Where is the self situated in the convergence of images and multiple public personae online? This day-long symposium invites artists, writers, critics, academics and…

Call for Papers | Atlantic Studies: Global Currents Special Issue: “Colonial Caribbean Visual Cultures”

Image: James Hakewill, Haughton Court, Hanover, Jamaica, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

This multidisciplinary collection will examine the creation and circulation of colonial visual cultures from the Caribbean during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The era of Caribbean slavery placed the islands at the centre of the production and movement of goods, ideas, money and peoples, as well as cultural conflicts, exchanges and hybridities which created new challenges for artists, and new ways of looking. As a cornerstone of European imperial expansion the Caribbean had an enormous imaginative influence on Europe and the wider world. Tropical vistas and diverse peoples provided new visual subjects, and the art of the Caribbean participated in the circum-Atlantic movement of aesthetics, ideas and images: from mid-eighteenth-century georgic scenes which attempted to reconcile beauty with enslaved labour, to the colonial picturesque of the 1790s which rearticulated metropolitan landscape visions, to the unique botanical and zoological images which…

CFP | EMAJ 10

Call for papers | EMAJ 10 The editors of EMAJ (www.emajartjournal.com) are seeking articles for their upcoming issue EMAJ 10. This is an open issue and the editors welcome articles on any topic relating to art history and visual culture. Articles will be published in April 2017. EMAJ welcomes monographic articles about specific artists or art collectives as well as thematic or theoretical analyses of art history from any historical period. Established and emerging researchers working within the fields of art history, architectural history, curatorship, aesthetics, visual culture, and museum studies are encouraged to submit. EMAJ is dedicated to providing a platform for emerging research and particularly encourages submissions from early career scholars and PhD students. All accepted submissions are double-blind peer reviewed. Manuscripts must be submitted by email to emaj.editors@gmail.com, as word documents (.doc) only. Articles can be between 5000-10000…

Call for Papers | Latecomers Anita Brookner Then and Now | Melbourne – March 2017

As we approach the first anniversary of Anita Brookner’s death, this first international and interdisciplinary conference devoted to Brookner seeks to explore the meaning and significance of Brookner’s vast legacy, in both fiction and non-fiction. Presented by The University of Melbourne Venue: National Gallery of Victoria (International) The work of Anita Brookner occupies an ambiguous place in the literary field. Brookner has a cult status, was a Booker-Prize winner and best-selling novelist, and yet her work received what she herself deemed ‘censorious’ reviews and limited critical attention. Brookner’s death was accompanied by conflicted accolades that appeared to celebrate her life while restating the predictable (and vexatious) reading of her identity as a lonely, single woman. In addition to her 24 novels and one novella, Brookner authored a number of art-historical works and was a prolific reviewer of art and literature…