Tag: Lecture

Lecture | Lady and the Unicorn – Dr Elisabeth Taburet-Delahaye | Australian Tapestry Workshop

Lady and the Unicorn Tapestry from the Musee Moyenage

As part of the Australian Tapestry Workshop’s fortieth anniversary celebrations, the world-renowned art historian and director of the National Museum of the Middle Ages in Paris (Musée national du Moyen Âge, formerly Musée de Cluny), Dr Élisabeth Taburet-Delahaye will present a public lecture in November about the recent restoration of the magnificent The Lady and the Unicorn tapestries. The Lady and the Unicorn tapestries are a series of six wool and silk tapestries created in the 16th century and are considered to be the most important tapestry series woven in Middle Ages Europe. Featured as part of the National Museum…

Lecture | Artist, Actress, Lover Johan Zoffany’s Portrait of Elizabeth Farren as Hermione in Shakespeare’s ‘A Winter’s Tale’ (c.1780) – Vivien Gaston

Zoffany's portrait of Elizabeth Farren

Rae Alexander Lecture 2016 Zoffany’s Portrait of Elizabeth Farren as Hermione in Shakespeare’s ‘A Winter’s Tale’ in the NGV depicts one of the most striking scenes in all of Shakespeare’s plays, the moment when Hermione is returned to life. Vivien Gaston’s lecture will probe the work’s context in the life of the artist, the sitter and its owner and reveal the way a portrait can shape and direct the aspirations of all three. Celebrating Shakespeare’s 400th anniversary, the lecture will also show the continued impact of his plays and the nature of portraits as role-playing and performance. The Rae Alexander…

Lecture | Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda – Thai-Tanic-Three: Contemporary Thai Art in the Age of Constraints.

Photo of Professor Apinan Poshyananda

Professor Apinan Poshyananda will deliver the Keir Foundation Lecture on the emergence of Thai contemporary art. This lecture will close the three-day Symposium Regions of the Contemporary: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia, Saturday 5–Monday 7 November 2016, at the University of Melbourne. Free Public Lecture – All Welcome – Registration required as seating is limited. To register visit: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/keirfoundation Date: Monday, 7 November 2016, 3-4pm Venue: Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room, Level 1, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, Swanston Street, University of Melbourne Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda is former Permanent Secretary of Ministry of Culture, Thailand. He is art historian, critic,…

Lecture | Léuli Eshraghi – Curating Under Pressure in Settler Colonies | Black Dot Gallery

NB Due to unforeseen circumstances, Tina Baum’s lecture, ‘To Tri or Not: The Indigenous presence in “iennials,”’ has been cancelled. Léuli Eshraghi’s lecture, ‘Curating Under Pressure in Settler Colonies,’ will take place at 2:30pm at Blak Dot Gallery, Brunswick. Saturday, 29th October 2016, 2:30pmBlak Dot Gallery, Brunswick Free to attend This lecture explores the pressures and tensions for First Nations curators, artists and thinkers when presenting ceremonial-political practices in culturally unsafe, Eurocentric art museums. How do major presenting, learning and teaching programs in settler colonies address civilisational gaps in knowledges and presences of and determined by First Nations? Léuli Eshraghi…

MUMA Boiler Room Lecture | The Artist as Quarry, Tirdad Zolghadr | MPavilion

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MUMA is pleased to host the special lecture, Artist as Quarry, by visiting international curator and writer, Tirdad Zolghadr. Artists are always falling prey to something or other. Censorship, curators, bad lighting, jet lag, bigotry, cultural prejudice, institutions in particular and The Institution At Large. Never are they complicit in any of these things. The goal of this lecture is not to trace examples of when victimization is real or imagined but to map the role and political rationale of self-marginalization within the moral economy of contemporary art. The goal of this exercise, in turn, is to speculate as to…

Lecture | Dr Chris McAuliffe Blind Replicators and Conscious Foresight: Surviving Circulation | TarraWarra Museum of Art

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Dr Chris McAuliffe | Blind Replicators and Conscious Foresight: Surviving Circulation Date: Sunday, 23rd October 2016, 2:00pm Venue: TarraWarra Museum of Art Free to attend The 2016 TarraWarra Biennial addresses the ideas of circulation and continuity emerging in art’s passage through institutional and industry channels such as exhibitions, magazines, galleries and museums. The sense of opportunity and crisis associated with these ideas might be traced back to 1976, when two challenging proposals relating to circulation and continuity were made. Writing in the first issue of the journal October, critic Rosalind Krauss reflected on artists’ extensive engagement with circulatory media, such…

Three lectures at the Power Institute | Frédéric Ogée, Tamar Garb and Sheridan Palmer

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Three lectures at the Power Institute in Sydney over the next three weeks by interstate and international guest speakers.  Frédéric Ogée Hogarth’s Bodies Thursday 20 October, 6.00pm In his choice of subjects and in his painting technique, William Hogarth’s rendering of ‘life’ is remarkable for its tangible physicality. In this lecture, Professor Ogée argues that Hogarthian beauty and grace, far from being abstract concepts or resulting from the formal application of a set of rules, emerge as transient, ‘living’, physical phenomena, apprehended by the beholder through visual representations of the bodies’ natural and ‘peculiar’ movements. Frédéric Ogée is Professor of British Literature and Art History…

Lecture | Shoreline Landscapes and the Edges of Empire – Rachel DeLue | Power Institute Sydney

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The Power Institute with Sydney Ideas is pleased to present a lecture by American art specialist Rachael DeLue, that considers the significance of the shoreline in the work of prominent nineteenth century Australian and American artists.  Defined as the line where a body of water meets the land, a shoreline is a space of contact, marking the point of convergence between different terrains, peoples, and ecosystems.  Shorelines also engender diverse forms of knowledge, including the outer limits of nation states, the geologic history of the earth, or the effect of climate change on global sea levels.  Depending on one’s point…

Writing and Concepts # 21 | Nikos Papastergiadis | RMIT Design Hub

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Nikos Papastergiadis …speculates on the role that writing plays in the development of the concepts in his work. RMIT Design Hub, L3 Lecture Theatre 5:00pm Thursday 6 October Link to Facebook event NIKOS PAPASTERGIADIS is Professor at the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. He studied at the University of Melbourne and University of Cambridge. Prior to returning to the University of Melbourne he was a lecturer at the University of Manchester. Throughout his career, Nikos has provided strategic consultancies for government agencies on issues relating to cultural identity and worked on collaborative projects with artists…

Lecture | Unbeautiful Bodies in Ancient South Italy’ Ted Robinson | NGV International

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In the art of the Greek cities of South Italy, beautiful bodies are everywhere. The norms were subverted, though, when it came to representing the comic theatre, where the players are all shown as physically grotesque. There were many more vase-paintings which depicted comedy made in South Italy than in any other part of the Greek world, and several outstanding examples are in the collections of the National Gallery of Victoria. This lecture will seek to explain their conventions, and understand why depictions of unbeautiful bodies were so common in South Italy, even on vases that were used as grave-offerings.…

Lectures | David Solkin and Mark Hallett on British Eighteenth-Century Art | University of Sydney

Joshua Reynolds, John Manners, Marquess of Granby (detail), 1766, oil on canvas, 247.5 x 210.2 cm, Collection of John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida

The Power Institute is pleased to present two lectures on British art of the eighteenth century, by Professors David Solkin and Mark Hallett. David Solkin – English or European? Portraiture and the Politics of National Identity in Early Georgian Britain Professor Solkin’s lecture examines a fundamental shift in British portraiture during the reign of George II, which saw painters and patrons turn away from the established native heritage of Van Dyck, Lely, and Sir Godfrey Kneller, in favour of embracing the latest trends in Continental art practice. Spearheading this development were several immigrant European portraitists, led by Jean-Baptiste Van Loo, who…

Writing and Concepts | Lecture 17 Helen Grogan | RMIT Design Hub

HELEN GROGAN’s practise is informed by studies in philosophy and choreography, it operates critically and dynamically with exhibition formats and institutional conditions. She uses sculptural, photographic, and choreographic means to approach spatial and temporal experience as material. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at: Australian Centre for Contemporary Art; Art Gallery of New South Wales; 20th Biennale of Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria International; Gertrude Contemporary; 2nd Tbilisi Triennial; Liquid Architecture; Alaska Projects; Gertrude Glasshouse; Slopes; West Space; Rijksakademie; Stockholm Kulturhuset; Kontext Festival Berlin; VCA Margaret Lawrence Gallery; C3; La Macedora, amongst others. “Grogan’s practice is a continuous…

Duldig Sculpture Lecture | Sculpture and the Museum: From Fortunate Son to Runaway Child – Christopher Marshall | University of Melbourne

Image: Interior view, Gipsoteca canoviano, Possagno (Treviso)

In 2005, the Director of the National Gallery, London, signalled the long-standing eclipse of sculpture in favour of painting when he noted that “sculpture is what you fall over when you step back from the paintings”. The expanded field of contemporary sculptural practice, including installations, conceptual art and commissioned artist interventions, has nonetheless re-energised and revitalised the potential of sculpture to engage with the historical, institutional and even commercial dimensions of the museum. This lecture will consider the long and complex development from the Renaissance to today with a particular focus on the key role played by sculpture in communicating…

Lecture | Charles Green – Biennales, Triennales and documenta: The Exhibitions That Created Contemporary Art | NGV International

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Two main questions overlap in this lecture. What is the impact of biennials on contemporary art? And how have biennials changed in the course of the appearance of contemporary art? We will sum up the issues that we see played out in different biennials between 1955 to now. We will work through a typology of biennial formats, noting that each appears in turn as an answer to a set of problems and contingencies, whether these are artistic, political, or economic, but always in relation to globalisation (a process that we carefully distinguish from globalism, as the desire to be recognisably…

Lecture | Claude Perrault’s Royal Observatory and the Intractable Challenge of Comets by Claire Goldstein | University of Sydney

'Presentation of the Members of the Academy of Sciences to Louis XIV in 1667' by Henri Testelin

The Power Institute is pleased to invite you to a public lecture by Claire Goldstein, Associate Professor in the Department of French & Italian at the University of California, Davis. Louis XIV is one of the most iconic figures in European history. Styled the Sun King, he is remembered for his extravagant building projects, particularly those centred on the Chateau of Versailles, a site which came to function as a symbol of his long reign. At Versailles, Louis XIV shone most brilliantly, and prominent thinkers have long taken a critical interest in the ways the early years of his rule…