Tag: Lecture

Writing and Concepts | Lecture 17 Helen Grogan | RMIT Design Hub

HELEN GROGAN’s practise is informed by studies in philosophy and choreography, it operates critically and dynamically with exhibition formats and institutional conditions. She uses sculptural, photographic, and choreographic means to approach spatial and temporal experience as material. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at: Australian Centre for Contemporary Art; Art Gallery of New South Wales; 20th Biennale of Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria International; Gertrude Contemporary; 2nd Tbilisi Triennial; Liquid Architecture; Alaska Projects; Gertrude Glasshouse; Slopes; West Space; Rijksakademie; Stockholm Kulturhuset; Kontext Festival Berlin; VCA Margaret Lawrence Gallery; C3; La Macedora, amongst others. “Grogan’s practice is a continuous…

Duldig Sculpture Lecture | Sculpture and the Museum: From Fortunate Son to Runaway Child – Christopher Marshall | University of Melbourne

Image: Interior view, Gipsoteca canoviano, Possagno (Treviso)

In 2005, the Director of the National Gallery, London, signalled the long-standing eclipse of sculpture in favour of painting when he noted that “sculpture is what you fall over when you step back from the paintings”. The expanded field of contemporary sculptural practice, including installations, conceptual art and commissioned artist interventions, has nonetheless re-energised and revitalised the potential of sculpture to engage with the historical, institutional and even commercial dimensions of the museum. This lecture will consider the long and complex development from the Renaissance to today with a particular focus on the key role played by sculpture in communicating…

Lecture | Charles Green – Biennales, Triennales and documenta: The Exhibitions That Created Contemporary Art | NGV International

biennials triennials

Two main questions overlap in this lecture. What is the impact of biennials on contemporary art? And how have biennials changed in the course of the appearance of contemporary art? We will sum up the issues that we see played out in different biennials between 1955 to now. We will work through a typology of biennial formats, noting that each appears in turn as an answer to a set of problems and contingencies, whether these are artistic, political, or economic, but always in relation to globalisation (a process that we carefully distinguish from globalism, as the desire to be recognisably…

Lecture | Claude Perrault’s Royal Observatory and the Intractable Challenge of Comets by Claire Goldstein | University of Sydney

'Presentation of the Members of the Academy of Sciences to Louis XIV in 1667' by Henri Testelin

The Power Institute is pleased to invite you to a public lecture by Claire Goldstein, Associate Professor in the Department of French & Italian at the University of California, Davis. Louis XIV is one of the most iconic figures in European history. Styled the Sun King, he is remembered for his extravagant building projects, particularly those centred on the Chateau of Versailles, a site which came to function as a symbol of his long reign. At Versailles, Louis XIV shone most brilliantly, and prominent thinkers have long taken a critical interest in the ways the early years of his rule…

Lecture Series | The Art and Life of Edgar Degas – Roberta Crisci-Richardson | NGV International

Edgar Degas 
Family portrait (Portrait de famille), also called The Bellelli family 1867
oil on canvas
201.0 x 249.5 cm
Lemoisne 79
Musée d'Orsay, Paris (RF 2210)
© Musée d'Orsay, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Patrice Schmidt

Throughout art history Edgar Degas has been categorised as a nationalist, misogynist and experimental artist. But, is this an accurate portrayal? Considering Degas’s life and work from the streets of Paris to the walls of the salon – who was Degas really? In a series of three lectures, Dr Roberta Crisci-Richardson, author of Mapping Degas, challenges popular notions of Degas by considering his life and work in his context of nineteenth century France. Speaker Dr Roberta Crisci-Richardson, art historian, author of Mapping Degas: Real Spaces, Symbolic Spaces and Invented Spaces in the Life and Work of Edgar Degas (1834–1917) Book…

Lecture | Les Immatériaux: experiments in art and philosophy – Ashley Woodward | VCA

LES IMMATERIAUX Advert3

  Les Immatériaux: experiments in art and philosophy A public lecture by Ashley Woodward (Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Dundee) | 28th July 2016   Les Immatériaux (‘The Immaterials’), was a major exhibition held at the Georges Pompidou Centre, Paris, in 1985. It’s principal director was the philosopher Jean-François Lyotard. After several decades of little interest, this exhibition is increasingly becoming recognized as a landmark exhibition of the twentieth century, a recognition marked by a number of commemorative events in France, England, and Germany over the last several years to mark its 30th anniversary. The exhibition collected a wide array of…

Lecture | How Pre-Raphaelite Frames Influenced Degas and the Impressionists | NGV International

Ford Madox BROWN The finding of Don Juan by Haidée (1869-1870) {retouched (1871) and later}  watercolour and gouache over pencil 47.5 x 57.6 cm (sheet) Bennett A91 National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Felton Bequest, 1905 210-2

Enter the world of picture framing through a lecture by British art historian and specialist Lynn Roberts. Although often ignored, picture frames have a huge impact on our viewing and perception of pictures. This fact was well appreciated by many artists connected with the British Pre-Raphaelite and the French Impressionist movements, including Edgar Degas. For these artists, framing was a critical aspect of their art, and literally integral to it. In different ways their frames radically contrasted to the conventional, ornate frames in which pictures were hung in official exhibitions such as the Salon in Paris and Royal Academy in…

Writing and Concepts | Lecture 12 Helen Johnson | RMIT Design Hub

Helen Johnson lecture image

Helen Johnson Helen Johnson is an artist, writer and teacher based in Melbourne. Painting is at the centre of her practice. Recent solo exhibitions include Barron Field as part of the 2016 Glasgow International and Slow Learners at Château Shatto, Los Angeles in 2015. She has recently exhibited work as part of June: A Painting Show at Sadie Coles, London; In my absence at Jocelyn Wolff, Paris; and Pleasure and Reality at the NGV. In 2017 Johnson will present a solo exhibition at the ICA in London. In 2015 she launched a book titled Painting is a Critical Form, developed…

MUMA Boiler Room Lecture | Outlaw Territories – Felicity D. Scott | State Library of Victoria

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Outlaw Territories Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) is pleased to present a special lecture by visiting international curator and writer, Felicity D. Scott. Felicity D. Scott will discuss her book, Outlaw Territories: Environments of Insecurity/Architectures of Counter-insurgency (Zone Books, 2016), which outlines the historical and contemporary legacy of the American counterculture from the 1960s and ‘70s and its effects on environmental governance and the management of populations globally. During this lecture Scott will draw connections between many subjects including Kevin Roche’s designs for the Ford Foundation Headquarters and One United Nations Plaza in New York; the Open Land communes…

Lecture | Australian Identity Through Cultural Materials Conservation – Robyn Sloggett | University of Melbourne

University of Melbourne Archives. Ray Jones Collection, Accession No. 1981.0081

Australian Identity Through Cultural Materials Conservation | Inaugural Professorial Lecture by Professor Robyn Sloggett AM. Hosted by the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies The material world surrounds us: feeding our senses, our imagination and our curiosity. We inherit and we create cultural and scientific records that help us make sense of this world. Cultural materials conservation employs materiality to understand and protect these records, integrating knowledge acquired in the sciences and the humanities with that developed by cultural knowledge holders and practitioners. Conservation studies provide unique understandings of how cultural knowledge, disciplinary knowledge and the materiality that surrounds us, can come together to shed light on significant questions of knowledge and identity. In…

Writing and concepts | Lecture 11 Maura Edmond | RMIT Design Hub

The Scheme was a Blueprint for Future Development Programs, designed in collaboration between Simon Browne and Agatha Gothe-Snape, 2015 (photo by Simon Browne).

Maura Edmond Maura Edmond is an academic, a writer and an amateur gardener. Her writing on art and culture has been published in New Media and Society, Television and New Media, Art and Australia, Un, Eyeline, Artlink and elsewhere. In 2012 and 2013 she was section editor and lead writer for the Arts and Museum pages of Melbourne’s Time Out magazine. Since 2013 she has run Primer <primermag.net> a website and e-newsletter profiling Melbourne artists and exhibitions. Maura was awarded her PhD from Melbourne University’s School of Culture and Communication and is currently a Research Fellow in the School of…

Eugene Y. Wang lecture at Melbourne Uni|A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond?

Tianjin Railway Station. Ceiling of entrance hall. via wikimedia 秦征 Qin Zheng, 王玉琦 Wang Yuqi, 吴恩海 Wu Enhai, 马园 Ma Yuan, 王小杰 Wang Xiaojie, 高冬人 Gao Dongren (天津美术学院 Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Tianjin)

A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? Professor Eugene Y. Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, Harvard University This lecture is also being presented in Sydney, see this post for more information. This lecture, by renowned scholar of Asian Art, Eugene Wang, will consider the coming together of Western artistic traditions and traditional Chinese culture and legend. As Professor Wang explains in the introduction to his presentation: The daughter of a prehistorical sage-king, so an ancient Chinese tale goes, is accidentally drowned in the Eastern Sea. Her afterlife spirit turns…

Lecture | A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? – Eugene Y. Wang | University of Sydney

Tianjin Railway Station. Ceiling of entrance hall. via wikimedia 秦征 Qin Zheng, 王玉琦 Wang Yuqi, 吴恩海 Wu Enhai, 马园 Ma Yuan, 王小杰 Wang Xiaojie, 高冬人 Gao Dongren (天津美术学院 Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Tianjin)

A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? Professor Eugene Y. Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, Harvard University This lecture is also being presented in Melbourne, see this post for further information. This lecture, by renowned scholar of Asian Art, Eugene Wang, will consider the coming together of Western artistic traditions and traditional Chinese culture and legend. As Professor Wang explains in the introduction to his presentation: The daughter of a prehistorical sage-king, so an ancient Chinese tale goes, is accidentally drowned in the Eastern Sea. Her afterlife spirit turns…

Lecture | Emily Pethick – The Artist As…Collaborator | West Space

Photo of Emily Pethick

West Space in association with the Institute of Modern Art (IMA) Brisbane and Curatorial Practice at MADA (Monash Art Design and Architecture) are pleased to present a special lecture by Emily Pethick. Pethick’s lecture is part of The Artist As… a year-long lecture series co-presented by the IMA and Curatorial Practice at MADA. Emily Pethick will speak about the artist as collaborator through examples from The Showroom, a non-profit independent contemporary art space in London. She will discuss some of the artists’ projects produced that have involved diverse forms of participation, as well as in relation to how the organisation…

Writing and Concepts | Lecture 9 Phip Murray | RMIT Design Hub

The Scheme was a Blueprint for Future Development Programs, designed in collaboration between Simon Browne and Agatha Gothe-Snape, 2015 (photo by Simon Browne).

Phip Murray Phip Murray is an independent writer and curator and History/Theory Coordinator for RMIT’s Interior Design program in the School of Architecture + Design. Previous roles include Director of West Space (2008-12) and Visual Arts/New Media Associate Producer for the Next Wave Festival (2006). Phip writes often about art, including catalogue texts, artist profiles and other art criticism. She also writes frequently for the National Gallery of Victoria including the books: Frederick McCubbin: The North wind (2015), a book exploring new research into one of McCubbin’s most iconic but mysterious history paintings; Loti Smorgon: A Life With Art (2015),…