Tag Archive for Lecture

Lecture, Symposium and Exhibition | Gerard Byrne ‘Museums for playback!’ | MADA, Monash University

Gerard Byrne - Museums for Playback

Irish artist Gerard Byrne will present a special keynote lecture to mark the closing of MADA’s Master of Fine Art graduate exhibition (12-18 February) and as part of MADA’s Fine Art Postgraduate Symposium. In his address Irish artist Gerard Byrne’s lecture will focus on his moving-image practice, using the analogy of playback as a way of delimiting the function of the exhibition and highlighting the recuperative and recall dimensions of his projects within the context of the museum. Byrne explores the themes of image and time, performativity, mediation, and the “museum” itself as an embodiment of historical discourse. Byrne has made a significant contribution to contemporary video, photography and live art since 1991. He has exhibited extensively including the Tate Gallery,…

Opening Weekend | Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei | NGV International

Andy Warhol   Ai Weiwei   NGV

The NGV has organised a series of talks and lectures to celebrate the opening of their summer exhibition Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei. Saturday 12th and Sunday 13th at 11am | Curatorial Introduction to the exhibition . Learn more about the artistic practices of Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei with a curatorial introduction by Max Delany, Senior Curator, Contemporary Art Cost $8 M / $12 A / $10 C. Bookings here. Saturday 12th December 3pm | Lecture – Andy Warhol: The Man and the Artist | Eric Shiner, Director, The Andy Warhol Museum Opening to the public only seven years after the artist’s death, The Andy Warhol Museum is the largest museum in the United States dedicated to a single artist. Located in his hometown…

Lecture | Conservation of Chinese Cultural Heritage from the Shaanxi Province – Yuan Hong | University of Melbourne

Murals: Museum of Prince Jieman, Tang Dynast

Associate Professor Yuan Hong will present on Mural conservation and scientific methods used in extraction of cultural information. Murals contained within tombs pose a diverse range of site specific issues in their investigation and conservation. Using microscopic techniques, spectrographic imaging and elemental analysis, information embedded in the murals can be used to inform conservators about the original materials as well as the condition and treatment requirements of these forms of cultural heritage. Ms Zhang Yongjian explores Laboratory-based micro-scale excavation and its application Current methods used in the lab-based, micro-scale excavation of cultural relics are capable of having the combined merits of excavation, archaeometry and conservation. These methods have proven to be especially effective in the excavation and treatment of cultural…

Lecture | The Robert Wilson Annual Decorative Arts Lecture: Amarna Palace Ware – decorated ceramics of Egypt’s Golden Age – Colin Hope | NGV International

EGYPT, Malqata, Palace of Amenhotep III, Blue-painted ibex amphora, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Amenhotep III, c. 1390–1353 BCE, Nile silt, white slipped and decorated, 39.5 x 21.0 cm diameter, Rogers Fund, 1911 (11.215.460), Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

The study of ancient Egyptian decorative arts tends to focus upon manufactures in glass, precious stones and glazed composition, such a jewellery, containers and sculptures. Ceramics, which were generally undecorated, are viewed as utilitarian and often ignored. Yet during the New Kingdom – Egypt’s Golden Age – elaborately decorated pottery was produced for use on festive occasions within palaces, temples and the homes of the elite. The best quality was made in the period of King Akhenaten and Queen Nefertiti, their likely son Tutankhamun and the king’s father Amenhotep III (1390-1327 BCE), in the royal workshops using a pale blue cobalt pigment and with a wide range of other techniques. It was distributed around the country and has been found…

Lecture| Commemorating The Great War in a Community Museum | University of Melbourne

Date: Wednesday, Oct 2015 6:00–7:30PM Venue: Theatre A, Elisabeth Murdoch Building, University of Melbourne Bookings: https://events.unimelb.edu.au/events/5693-commemorating-the-great-war-in-a-community-museum This lecture will present a community-engagement project which was focused on the development of the museological skills of volunteers running the LifeCare retirement village’s War Museum. University of Melbourne conservation students have worked with residents and volunteers for the past 5 years to help them establish good museum practices. The students’ appreciation of their positive contribution to stakeholder engagement, community museums and commemorative displays deepened as residents demonstrated the links between their wartime experiences and the collection. With increasing professional activity the museum’s public profile expanded, inducing more residents to contribute more time, objects and stories to the museum. The project’s beneficial outcomes—educational, personal and community—demonstrate that…

Lecture | Design and Violence – Paola Antonelli | NGV International

Paola Antonelli. Copyright Robin Holland. Image via http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/program/design-and-violence-2/?

Design has a history of violence. Aside from commercial and aesthetic successes, many design objects have ambiguous relationships with violence, challenging us with moral ambiguities and inconsistencies. MoMA curator Paola Antonelli explores how design can provide extraordinary insight into society and human nature, uncovering the dark side of the world’s ‘second oldest’ profession. Paola Antonelli is Senior Curator, Architecture and Design and Director of Research and Development at New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Antonelli’s work investigates design’s influence on everyday experience, advocating for often overlooked objects and practices. Antonelli recently began adding to the MoMA Collection a range of important contemporary designs – videogames, the @ symbol and Google Map drop pin. Speaker Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, Architecture…

Lecture | Scorn, Greed, Malevolence & Mischief: Goya’s graphic expression of emotions – Deanna Petherbridge | University of Melbourne

Francisco Goya, No es siempre bueno el rigor, 1816-1820 c.

This presentation will examine the consummate skill with which Goya represents emotions in his late private albums and some of the print series associated with these drawings. From 1795-6 Goya borrows the figure of the bruja or witch as an historically subversive topos for portraying his disgust with a corrupt clergy, monarchy and cruel social order. As the proportions of his figures change in the album drawings so his ability to suggest subtlety of facial and bodily emotions in his brush and pen work deepens. Language also becomes more intense for Goya, isolated by his total deafness, and the texts appended to drawings and prints are variably metaphoric, playing with language/visual puns or seeming blocks to clarity of meaning. Like…

Lectures on The Origins and Development of Ceramic Design – Leslie B. Grigsby | NGV

The Netherlands
Garniture 1680–1700
earthenware (tin-glazed)
(a) 64.3 x 29.5 x 29.2 cm (vase)
(b-c) 65.1 x 39.1 x 38.6 cm (overall) (covered vase)
(d) 64.6 x 28.9 x 29.5 cm (vase)
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Felton Bequest, 2015

John Kenny Memorial Lectures | The Origins and Development of Ceramic Design | Saturday 26th September from 10am at NGV International Speaker Leslie B. Grigsby, Senior Curator of Ceramics and Glass, Winterthur Museum, Delaware, USA Book online here – $75 members/ $85 full Explore the development of design in glass and earthenware in these three special lectures by Leslie B. Grigsby, Senior Curator of Ceramics and Glass, Winterthur Museum, Delaware, USA .Presented by The Ceramics and Glass Circle of Australia. 10am: “An Adoration of the Orient: The Chinese Taste Reflected in Western Ceramics” Focussing on Chinese ceramics and selected other Asian artwork such as lacquer ware, in this lecture Grigsby will explore important inspirations for Western ceramic design from the 17th to the early 19th centuries. English and Continental European…

Lecture | Herzschmerz – Love And Pain: Representing the Heart in Early Modern Art | Dagmar Eichberger

Heart Emblem, from A Collection of Emblemes, George Wither, 1635

This paper investigates the contexts in which the image of a heart-shaped object could be used in order to evoke a range of different meanings. Human love and magic, divine love and faith, the passion of Christ and the sorrows of the Virgin Mary are some of the most prominent associations invoked by the heart in the early modern period and beyond. The heart can also be used in a more allegorical context to signify wrath and envy. Thus the heart is often employed as a symbol for compassion (or lack of compassion), a tradition that continued well into the modern period as Wilhelm Hauff’s novel Cold Heart and other literary texts convey. Dagmar Eichberger is part of an EU-funded research project, Artifex, at the University of Trier and is Professor in the Department of…

Lecture Series | Philosophy, Literature, and Catherine the Great | NGV International

Marie-Anne COLLOT, French 1748–1821, Voltaire (1770s),, marble, 49.0 x 30.0 x 28.0 cm
The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (Inv. no. Н.ск. 3) Acquired from the artist, 1778

In conjunction with the current NGV exhibition Masterpieces from the Hermitage: The Legacy of Catherine the Great the NGV is presenting a series of lectures on Philosophy, Literature and Catherine the Great. Catherine the Great’s intellectual pursuits extended far beyond her collection of art. Exchanging letters over a fifteen year period with French writer, historian and philosopher Voltaire, she was spurred to bring Russia into the modern era through ideas raised by the Enlightenment and its supporters. Patronage of the arts and education, as well as economic achievements, led to Catherine’s reign being cited as the golden age of Russia. In this special series of four lectures, specialists of history, philosophy and literature explore this rich period through the lens of the philosophers and…

Lecture | The Hours of Jeanne de Navarre, Three Medieval Queens and Hermann Goering – Christopher de Hamel | University of Melbourne

christopher_de_hamel

Early Books of Hours, especially those made for women, have long been a speciality of Professor Margaret Manion, who in 1998 published a major article on the famous fourteenth-century Book of Hours of Queen Jeanne of Navarre, in the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris (ms n.a. lat. 3093). This lecture takes up her lead and it asks why and when this beautiful manuscript was made, and why it includes some very rare components and extraordinary pictures, then unparalleled in medieval art. It follows the history of this Book of Hours in directions hitherto unsuspected, tracing its descent through the possession of at least four different reigning queens, of Navarre, France and England. Using entirely unknown material, it follows the astonishing journey…

Boiler Room Lecture | Jalal Toufic Which Is the More Difficult in the Christian Era: to Resurrect or to Bury? | State Library of Victoria

Jalal Toufic, Self Portrait? (2007)

Monash University Museum of Art [MUMA] in partnership with Monash Art Design & Architecture [MADA] are pleased to co-present a keynote lecture by Lebanese artist, writer and thinker Jalal Toufic, whose influence in the Beirut artistic community over the past two decades has been immense. The lecture will be introduced by Callum Morton, MADA Head of Department, and will be followed by a screening of Toufic’s video Attempt 137 to Map the Drive (7 minutes, 2011; made in collaboration with Graziella Rizkallah Toufic). Jalal Toufic is a thinker and a mortal to death. He was born in 1962 in Beirut or Baghdad and died before dying in 1989 in Evanston, Illinois. His books, many of which were published by Forthcoming…

Lecture | Conservation of cultural heritage, Henan Province, China – Chen Jiachang and Lan Wanli | University of Melbourne

Diseased archaeological site

Disease types and the conservation status of archaeological site museums | Professor CHEN Jiachang,  Director,  Henan Provincial Conservation Centre for Cultural Relics, Henan, China This lecture will introduce types of disease and the current conservation status of archaeological earthen sites in Henan province. It will discuss current approaches to conservation as well as proposed improvements to treatment methods. Professor CHEN was elected Fellow of the China Association for Preservation Technology of Cultural Relics (CAPTCR) in 2012. Professor CHEN has overseen numerous conservation projects including the in situ preservation of large scale earthen relics; the exploration of new methods and materials for shape recovery of collapsed, archaeological wood ware and the preservation of metal relics. Conservation of cultural relics and tombs…

Lecture | The Artist as Collector: Sir Joshua Reynolds and his Collection of Art | Donato Esposito

Self-portrait of Sir Joshua Reynolds, P.R.A., ca. 1780
Oil on panel, 1270 X 1016 mm. Given by Sir Joshua Reynolds, P.R.A., 1780 . Royal Academy of Arts.

Dr Donato Esposito will present a lecture on Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792), the first and most famous President of the Royal Academy of Arts, London, focussing upon his activities as a collector of art. Dr Donato Esposito was a curator in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum, London (1999-2004). He co-curated the exhibition “Sir Joshua Reynolds: the acquisition of genius” at Plymouth City Museum & Art Gallery in 2009. He was recently an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. He is currently working on a monograph on Reynolds as an art collector. Date: Wednesday 29th July, 6:30pm Venue: theatre D, Old Arts Building, University of…

Lecture | Monuments of Remembrance – Bronwyn Hughes | NGV Australia

Mornington War Memorial 1925, bronze medallion created in 1918 by Dora Ohlfsen (1867-1948),

photographed by Bronwyn Hughes, 2015. Background is of the Somme Valley near Peronne, photographed by Bronwyn Hughes, 2003.

Duldig Studio, in association with the National Gallery of Victoria, is proud to present the 2015 Annual Duldig Lecture on Sculpture: Monuments of Remembrance by Dr Bronwyn Hughes, art historian and heritage consultant. The Annual Duldig Lecture on Sculpture was established to commemorate the life and work of the internationally recognised sculptor Karl Duldig and his wife, the artist and inventor, Slawa Duldig (née Horowitz). In this Monuments of Remembrance lecture, Dr Bronwyn Hughes will examine the impetus and values that underpinned the First World War commemoration movement through war monuments of national importance to the seemingly insignificant local memorial. It will  explore how Australian expectations, economies and aesthetics changed in the 1920s and 1930s post-War society and compare commemorations…