Tag Archive for Lecture

Lecture Series | The Art and Life of Edgar Degas – Roberta Crisci-Richardson | NGV International

Edgar Degas 
Family portrait (Portrait de famille), also called The Bellelli family 1867
oil on canvas
201.0 x 249.5 cm
Lemoisne 79
Musée d'Orsay, Paris (RF 2210)
© Musée d'Orsay, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Patrice Schmidt

Throughout art history Edgar Degas has been categorised as a nationalist, misogynist and experimental artist. But, is this an accurate portrayal? Considering Degas’s life and work from the streets of Paris to the walls of the salon – who was Degas really? In a series of three lectures, Dr Roberta Crisci-Richardson, author of Mapping Degas, challenges popular notions of Degas by considering his life and work in his context of nineteenth century France. Speaker Dr Roberta Crisci-Richardson, art historian, author of Mapping Degas: Real Spaces, Symbolic Spaces and Invented Spaces in the Life and Work of Edgar Degas (1834–1917) Book for the series or individually via the NGV website: http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/program/the-art-and-life-of-edgar-degas/ Cost: $16 M / $20 A / $18 C (individual lecture) $44 M…

Lecture | Les Immatériaux: experiments in art and philosophy – Ashley Woodward | VCA

LES IMMATERIAUX Advert3

  Les Immatériaux: experiments in art and philosophy A public lecture by Ashley Woodward (Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Dundee) | 28th July 2016   Les Immatériaux (‘The Immaterials’), was a major exhibition held at the Georges Pompidou Centre, Paris, in 1985. It’s principal director was the philosopher Jean-François Lyotard. After several decades of little interest, this exhibition is increasingly becoming recognized as a landmark exhibition of the twentieth century, a recognition marked by a number of commemorative events in France, England, and Germany over the last several years to mark its 30th anniversary. The exhibition collected a wide array of ‘new materials,’ including artefacts developed with new technologies, artworks made with such technologies, and the new technologies themselves. As such,…

Lecture | How Pre-Raphaelite Frames Influenced Degas and the Impressionists | NGV International

Ford Madox BROWN The finding of Don Juan by Haidée (1869-1870) {retouched (1871) and later}  watercolour and gouache over pencil 47.5 x 57.6 cm (sheet) Bennett A91 National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Felton Bequest, 1905 210-2

Enter the world of picture framing through a lecture by British art historian and specialist Lynn Roberts. Although often ignored, picture frames have a huge impact on our viewing and perception of pictures. This fact was well appreciated by many artists connected with the British Pre-Raphaelite and the French Impressionist movements, including Edgar Degas. For these artists, framing was a critical aspect of their art, and literally integral to it. In different ways their frames radically contrasted to the conventional, ornate frames in which pictures were hung in official exhibitions such as the Salon in Paris and Royal Academy in London. Explore the connections between the frame designs of the British Pre-Raphaelites and those of the French Impressionists, as seen in original Pre-Raphaelite…

Writing and Concepts | Lecture 12 Helen Johnson | RMIT Design Hub

Helen Johnson lecture image

Helen Johnson Helen Johnson is an artist, writer and teacher based in Melbourne. Painting is at the centre of her practice. Recent solo exhibitions include Barron Field as part of the 2016 Glasgow International and Slow Learners at Château Shatto, Los Angeles in 2015. She has recently exhibited work as part of June: A Painting Show at Sadie Coles, London; In my absence at Jocelyn Wolff, Paris; and Pleasure and Reality at the NGV. In 2017 Johnson will present a solo exhibition at the ICA in London. In 2015 she launched a book titled Painting is a Critical Form, developed from a PhD in Fine Art completed at Monash University in 2014, where she is also a lecturer. Johnson is…

MUMA Boiler Room Lecture | Outlaw Territories – Felicity D. Scott | State Library of Victoria

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Outlaw Territories Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) is pleased to present a special lecture by visiting international curator and writer, Felicity D. Scott. Felicity D. Scott will discuss her book, Outlaw Territories: Environments of Insecurity/Architectures of Counter-insurgency (Zone Books, 2016), which outlines the historical and contemporary legacy of the American counterculture from the 1960s and ‘70s and its effects on environmental governance and the management of populations globally. During this lecture Scott will draw connections between many subjects including Kevin Roche’s designs for the Ford Foundation Headquarters and One United Nations Plaza in New York; the Open Land communes and Earth People’s Parks; two major UN world conferences (the Human Environment in Stockholm of 1972 and the Human Settlements…

Lecture | Australian Identity Through Cultural Materials Conservation – Robyn Sloggett | University of Melbourne

University of Melbourne Archives. Ray Jones Collection, Accession No. 1981.0081

Australian Identity Through Cultural Materials Conservation | Inaugural Professorial Lecture by Professor Robyn Sloggett AM. Hosted by the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies The material world surrounds us: feeding our senses, our imagination and our curiosity. We inherit and we create cultural and scientific records that help us make sense of this world. Cultural materials conservation employs materiality to understand and protect these records, integrating knowledge acquired in the sciences and the humanities with that developed by cultural knowledge holders and practitioners. Conservation studies provide unique understandings of how cultural knowledge, disciplinary knowledge and the materiality that surrounds us, can come together to shed light on significant questions of knowledge and identity. In this lecture Professor Sloggett explores the valuable contribution that cultural materials conservation makes to the continual quest to understand our place…

Writing and concepts | Lecture 11 Maura Edmond | RMIT Design Hub

The Scheme was a Blueprint for Future Development Programs, designed in collaboration between Simon Browne and Agatha Gothe-Snape, 2015 (photo by Simon Browne).

Maura Edmond Maura Edmond is an academic, a writer and an amateur gardener. Her writing on art and culture has been published in New Media and Society, Television and New Media, Art and Australia, Un, Eyeline, Artlink and elsewhere. In 2012 and 2013 she was section editor and lead writer for the Arts and Museum pages of Melbourne’s Time Out magazine. Since 2013 she has run Primer <primermag.net> a website and e-newsletter profiling Melbourne artists and exhibitions. Maura was awarded her PhD from Melbourne University’s School of Culture and Communication and is currently a Research Fellow in the School of Media, Film and Journalism at Monash University. Her research examines the history of screen and media art, with a particular…

Eugene Y. Wang lecture at Melbourne Uni|A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond?

Tianjin Railway Station. Ceiling of entrance hall. via wikimedia 秦征 Qin Zheng, 王玉琦 Wang Yuqi, 吴恩海 Wu Enhai, 马园 Ma Yuan, 王小杰 Wang Xiaojie, 高冬人 Gao Dongren (天津美术学院 Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Tianjin)

A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? Professor Eugene Y. Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, Harvard University This lecture is also being presented in Sydney, see this post for more information. This lecture, by renowned scholar of Asian Art, Eugene Wang, will consider the coming together of Western artistic traditions and traditional Chinese culture and legend. As Professor Wang explains in the introduction to his presentation: The daughter of a prehistorical sage-king, so an ancient Chinese tale goes, is accidentally drowned in the Eastern Sea. Her afterlife spirit turns into a vengeful bird with a mission. She picks up—one at a time—a piece of wood or rock from the…

Lecture | A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? – Eugene Y. Wang | University of Sydney

Tianjin Railway Station. Ceiling of entrance hall. via wikimedia 秦征 Qin Zheng, 王玉琦 Wang Yuqi, 吴恩海 Wu Enhai, 马园 Ma Yuan, 王小杰 Wang Xiaojie, 高冬人 Gao Dongren (天津美术学院 Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Tianjin)

A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? Professor Eugene Y. Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, Harvard University This lecture is also being presented in Melbourne, see this post for further information. This lecture, by renowned scholar of Asian Art, Eugene Wang, will consider the coming together of Western artistic traditions and traditional Chinese culture and legend. As Professor Wang explains in the introduction to his presentation: The daughter of a prehistorical sage-king, so an ancient Chinese tale goes, is accidentally drowned in the Eastern Sea. Her afterlife spirit turns into a vengeful bird with a mission. She picks up—one at a time—a piece of wood or rock from the…

Lecture | Emily Pethick – The Artist As…Collaborator | West Space

Photo of Emily Pethick

West Space in association with the Institute of Modern Art (IMA) Brisbane and Curatorial Practice at MADA (Monash Art Design and Architecture) are pleased to present a special lecture by Emily Pethick. Pethick’s lecture is part of The Artist As… a year-long lecture series co-presented by the IMA and Curatorial Practice at MADA. Emily Pethick will speak about the artist as collaborator through examples from The Showroom, a non-profit independent contemporary art space in London. She will discuss some of the artists’ projects produced that have involved diverse forms of participation, as well as in relation to how the organisation works with artists through co-production. The series examines the ways artists move through the world, and how that movement might…

Writing and Concepts | Lecture 9 Phip Murray | RMIT Design Hub

The Scheme was a Blueprint for Future Development Programs, designed in collaboration between Simon Browne and Agatha Gothe-Snape, 2015 (photo by Simon Browne).

Phip Murray Phip Murray is an independent writer and curator and History/Theory Coordinator for RMIT’s Interior Design program in the School of Architecture + Design. Previous roles include Director of West Space (2008-12) and Visual Arts/New Media Associate Producer for the Next Wave Festival (2006). Phip writes often about art, including catalogue texts, artist profiles and other art criticism. She also writes frequently for the National Gallery of Victoria including the books: Frederick McCubbin: The North wind (2015), a book exploring new research into one of McCubbin’s most iconic but mysterious history paintings; Loti Smorgon: A Life With Art (2015), a profile of the art collector, philanthropist and great advocate for Australian contemporary art; and The NGV Story (2011), a…

Lecture | Marco Polo’s Tomatoes, or on Cross-Cultural Exchange in Early European Art | Anne Dunlop, Herald Chair in Fine Arts

Marco Polo with a caravan. Illustration from the 'Catalan Atlas'. Ar. 1375. Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris

Marco Polo’s Tomatoes, or on Cross-Cultural Exchange in Early European Art A lecture by Anne Dunlop, Herald Chair in Fine Arts In the last decades, the question of cross-cultural contact and exchange has emerged as a major field of research in Art History and the humanities in general. This work is driven by the need to understand the early history of our own global moment, but it is also part of a larger and more ambitious project: the attempt to write a global history of art, one that does not privilege Western production at the expense of other cultures. The importance of the project is clear, but there are many competing, and conflicting, ideas about how such a history should…

Lecture | A World of Things: Exchange and Material Culture in the First Global Age – Giorgio Riello | NGV International

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A World of Things: Exchange and Material Culture in the First Global Age, 1500-1800 | Robert Wilson Annual Lecture 2016 | Professor Giorgio Riello, Director of the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study and Professor of History at Warwick University We are often told that we live in an age of globalization, one of growing homogenization of consumption, increasing communication and cultural and economic integration. Yet the study of material culture suggests that today’s global connectedness is not new. The early modern period (c. 1500-1800) can be seen as the ‘first global age’ as contact between different parts of the world intensified. Explore the artefacts of the first global age and the role of material culture in creating global connectivity with prize-winning…

Lecture | Judy Watson | Monash Art Design & Architecture

Image: Judy Watson
From dusk till dawn: five Brisbane shields 2003 (detail)
ink, chinagraph pencil and synthetic polymer paint on canvas
Courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane
Photo: Carl Warner

Join us for an Artforum lecture by Judy Watson presented by Art Design & Architecture and introduced by Francis E. Parker. A direct descendant of the Waanyi clan, Judy Watson grew up in Brisbane and attended the Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education, Toowoomba, where she gained a Diploma of Creative Arts in 1979. After moving to Hobart in 1980, she graduated from the University of Tasmania with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1982. In 1990, she travelled to her grandmother’s country in north-west Queensland to learn more about her family’s connections to Riversleigh Station and Lawn Hill Gorge, and her grandmother’s stories. Watson’s matrilineal link to the country of her ancestors has always been central to her printmaking…

Writing and Concepts Lecture 5 | Kelly Fliedner | RMIT Design Hub

The Scheme was a Blueprint for Future Development Programs, designed in collaboration between Simon Browne and Agatha Gothe-Snape, 2015 (photo by Simon Browne).

Kelly Fliedner Kelly Fliedner has a diverse professional practice as a writer, curator, lecturer, producer and book club master. Her writing is varied, ranging from contemporary and art historical analysis, to a more creative style that lies somewhere between fictocriticism, experimental abstract poetry and traditional script writing. Kelly’s research has focused on publishing, experimental performance, music and interdisciplinary practices of artists, writers and musicians from the late 1970s and 80s, and her projects often incorporate (or riff off) works from these periods alongside contemporary examples. Kelly is currently working on a series of radio plays for the Next Wave Festival; is one of six Australian artists taking part of the Biennale of Sydney’s experimental writing project, The Bureau of Writing;…