Tag Archive for Sculpture

Lecture | Monuments of Remembrance – Bronwyn Hughes | NGV Australia

Mornington War Memorial 1925, bronze medallion created in 1918 by Dora Ohlfsen (1867-1948),

photographed by Bronwyn Hughes, 2015. Background is of the Somme Valley near Peronne, photographed by Bronwyn Hughes, 2003.

Duldig Studio, in association with the National Gallery of Victoria, is proud to present the 2015 Annual Duldig Lecture on Sculpture: Monuments of Remembrance by Dr Bronwyn Hughes, art historian and heritage consultant. The Annual Duldig Lecture on Sculpture was established to commemorate the life and work of the internationally recognised sculptor Karl Duldig and his wife, the artist and inventor, Slawa Duldig (née Horowitz). In this Monuments of Remembrance lecture, Dr Bronwyn Hughes will examine the impetus and values that underpinned the First World War commemoration movement through war monuments of national importance to the seemingly insignificant local memorial. It will  explore how Australian expectations, economies and aesthetics changed in the 1920s and 1930s post-War society and compare commemorations…

Exhibition and Curator’s Talk | Duldig Studio

Karl Duldig, Under guard (3) c. 1940 pen and ink on paper, 300x210mm © The Duldig Studio

As part of the 2015 National Trust Heritage Festival, Melinda Mockridge, co-curator of the award-winning Art Behind the Wire exhibition, will be giving talks on the exhibition at the Duldig Studio on 21 and 23 April and 5 and 7 May from 2.30pm- 4pm.  Bookings are required for the tours only as numbers are limited. Tickets are priced at $25 for adult, $20 for concession. About the Exhibition During WWII, the British and Australian Governments interned many people considered a threat to security as ‘enemy aliens’. In Victoria one internment camp was purpose built with funding from the British Government at Tatura near Shepparton in country Victoria. Sculptor Karl Duldig, his wife artist inventor Slawa and their young daughter Eva were…

Exhibition Review | Atua: sacred gods from Polynesia | David Hansen

Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia Stone figure 19th century, Musée du quai Branly, Paris © 2013. Musée du quai Branly photograph: Hughes Dubois/Scala, Florence

  This is a ‘pre-print’ version of a review to be published by the University of Hawai’i Press in The Contemporary Pacific (vol. 17 no.1) in early 2015. Atua: sacred gods from Polynesia is on at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra from 23 May – 3 August 2014 As you pass between the split-text panels at the entrance to Atua: sacred gods from Polynesia, your first encounter is with two semi-abstract totemic figures from a ritual sanctuary or marae, carved by contemporary Cook Island artist Eruera Nia. Embedded in a low, square, grey plinth, these silver-weathered woodenarabesques or parentheses are at once descriptive and abstract, hieratic and dynamic, leaping up into vision and consciousness in a manner comparable to that of…

Lecture | 2014 Duldig Lecture – Matthew Martin on Spanish Sculpture | NGV International

Guido Reni Italian 1575–1642 Saint Sebastian (San Sebastiano) 1615–20 oil on canvas 170.5 x 133.0 cm Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid (P00211) Spanish Royal Collection

Blood and Tears: Seventeenth-century Spanish sculpture Dr Matthew Martin, Curator, Decorative Arts & Antiquities at the NGV The Counter-reformation saw the rise of a new, more intense kind of realism in seventeenth-century Spanish art. Painters and sculptors sought to create images of Christ, the Virgin, and saints which were as lifelike and accessible as possible. This realism was starkly austere, emotionally gripping, and even gory, intended to shock the senses and stir the soul. While the painters of this period, like Diego Velázquez and Francisco de Zurbarán, are ranked amongst the great masters of European art, the sculptors who were their contemporaries are largely unknown outside Spain. This lecture will explore the place of these artists and the masterpieces they…

Exhibition | Being Human: The Graphic Work of George Baldessin | Heide Museum of Modern Art

George Baldessin, Seated Figure, 1973, colour etching and aquatint plate 56.2 x 50.5 cm Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne Gift of Tess, Gabriel and Ned Baldessin 2010 © Estate of George Baldessin

Being Human: The Graphic Work of George Baldessin Heide Museum of Modern Art until Sunday 19 October 2014 About the Exhibition | In a short but intensive career as a painter, sculptor and printmaker, George Baldessin attracted critical acclaim from peers and audiences alike, admired for his expertise in intaglio printing (etching) and his radical figurative style during the 1960s and 70s when abstraction was dominant. Being Human: The Graphic Work of George Baldessin, focuses on Baldessin’s powerful prints and drawings, created between the artist’s exhibition debut in 1964 and his untimely death in 1978, aged thirty-nine. The exhibition includes seventeen works recently gifted to the museum by the Estate of George Baldessin, which will be exhibited together at Heide for the…

Exhibition | Emily Floyd ‘Far Rainbow’ | Heide Museum of Modern Art

xl-FLOYD2013FarRainbow

Emily Floyd – Far Rainbow Heide Museum of Modern Art until 13 July 2014 Heide Museum of Modern Art is currently exhibiting a survey of works by Melbourne based, contemporary artist Emily Floyd. The exhibition brings together key works from the past ten years of Floyd’s practice with eleven new works created specifically for Heide galleries and grounds. The title Far Rainbow is taken from a 1963 Soviet science-fiction story set on the imaginary planet Rainbow, a utopian location inhabited by artists and scientists, which faces destruction when a science experiment spirals out of control. A starship sent to rescue the children and their teachers becomes like an orbiting kindergarten carrying with it the possibility of a regenerated future. This…

Exhibition Review | The Treasures of Naples | John Weretka

Fig. 3 Unknown Neapolitan Artist, St John the Baptist, 1695, Museum of the Treasury of S. Gennaro, Naples

Il Tesori di Napoli: I Capolavori del Museo di San Gennaro John Weretka Palazzo Sciarra, Rome 30th October 2013-16 February 2014 (now extended until March) Wowing enthusiastic crowds at the Palazzo Sciarra in Rome is a show entitled Treasures of Naples: Masterworks of the Museum of S. Gennaro. Although compact in size, this show brings together some of the prized objects of the Treasury of S. Gennaro, normally held at the Museum of the Treasury of S. Gennaro in Naples; this is the first time a collection of these objects has been permitted to travel. The opening room of this exhibition swiftly sets up the cultural context of S. Gennaro with Francesco Solimena’s magnificent 1702 painting of S. Gennaro blessing,…

Lecture | Between Surrealism and Pop: The early career of Eduardo Paolozzi – Ryan Johnston

Paolozzi in his studio

Between Surrealism and Pop: The early career of Eduardo Paolozzi Ryan Johnston, Head of Art, Australian War Memorial This lecture will explore the early career and intellectual biography of Eduardo Paolozzi. Beginning with his experience of the Second World War, the lecture will trace his formative years in post-war Paris, where he sought out the legacy of the historical avant-garde and then 1950s London where, at the Institute of Contemporary Art, he was a member of the Independent Group, an informal, cross-disciplinary think-tank dedicated to the investigation of popular culture. Venue: NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road, Clemenger BBDO Auditorium, Ground Level Date: 2-3pm, Saturday 26th October NGV website

NGV Lecture | Monet and Rodin: Separate Artists, Similar Paths, Laurie Benson

Auguste Rodin, The thinker  (Le Penseur), 1884 via ngv.vic.gov.au

Monet and Rodin: Separate Artists, Similar Paths Laurie Benson, Curator, International Art This lecture is presented in association with the 2013 Melbourne Winter Masterpieces exhibition Monet’s Garden: The Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris. Born within two days of one another and ultimately achieving success, fame and recognition, both artists trod intriguing and very bumpy paths to attain their status in the art world. They were both revolutionaries who transformed art in their respective media. They were also good friends and they exhibited together in a landmark joint show in 1889. This talk will explore the synergies between these two giants of French art, and keen gardeners. The Annual Duldig Lecture on Sculpture commemorates the life and work of the internationally recognised…

Symposium | Sculpture: Place and Space

David_Jensz_Life_Cycle

 Sculpture: Place and Space Australian National University, Research School of Humanities and the Arts, the ANU School of Art and the National Gallery of Australia National Gallery of Australia, May 10 – 12, 2013 The symposium is a highlight of the 2013 Centenary of Canberra program TOUCH: Sculpture and the Land that has been designed to celebrate sculpture in all its forms. TOUCH: Sculpture and the Land is taking place in venues across Canberra in May 2013 and includes special exhibitions at the ANU Drill Hall Gallery and School of Art Gallery, various activities and events at ACT Galleries and Art Centres, artists in residence, walks, talks and tours of sculpture collections on the ANU Campus and International Sculpture Park and…

Reminder | Preserving Outdoor Sculpture and Monuments

Preserving Outdoor Sculpture and Monuments Places still available in this workshop Presented by the AICCM Objects Special Interest Group with the generous support of the Gordon Darling Foundation Melbourne, 8-9 November 2012 The objective of the workshop is to learn preservation strategies for outdoor sculpture and monuments. Participation is open to individuals responsible for the care of outdoor sculpture and monuments. The workshop is designed primarily for collections managers, public art administrators, and individuals responsible for commissioning, maintaining and administering public art collections. Artists, fabricators, conservators and other individuals who work with public sculpture and monuments are also welcome to attend on a space available basis. This two-day workshop presents the broader preservation issues of commissioning new works of art,…

Short Course | Preserving Outdoor Sculpture and Monuments

Preserving Outdoor Sculpture and Monuments Presented by the AICCM Objects Special Interest Group with the generous support of the Gordon Darling Foundation Melbourne, 8-9 November 2012 The objective of the workshop is to learn preservation strategies for outdoor sculpture and monuments. Participation is open to individuals responsible for the care of outdoor sculpture and monuments. The workshop is designed primarily for collections managers, public art administrators, and individuals responsible for commissioning, maintaining and administering public art collections. Artists, fabricators, conservators and other individuals who work with public sculpture and monuments are also welcome to attend on a space available basis. This two-day workshop presents the broader preservation issues of commissioning new works of art, monitoring conditions, developing a maintenance program,…

Review | Franco Mormando, ‘Bernini: His Life and His Rome’. Reviewed by John Weretka

bernini_mormando

Franco Mormando, Bernini: His Life and His Rome, 2011 John Weretka Franco Mormando, Bernini: His Life and His Rome, Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2011 (ISBN-13 978-0-226-53852-2). Surprising as it may be, in a world awash with biographies of his somewhat older contemporary, Caravaggio, Bernini has all too frequently been overlooked in the traditional life-and-works genre. After filling the better part of half a century with a torrent of works in almost all media and for almost all occasions, the employee of a succession of popes and a leading figure in shaping the look of Rome during its seventeenth-century Golden Age, Bernini passed into eternity almost unnoticed: as Franco Mormando notes, we know reasonably little about the artist’s death and funeral exequies from contemporary…

Lecture and Panel Discussion | Public Art, Spatial Practices and the City

John Vella, 2010, HANGBANG (nightshift), Contemporary Art Spaces Tasmania (CAST), Hobart. Image via http://publicartresearch.wordpress.com/

  Public Art, Spatial Practices and the City John Vella, Tasmanian School of Art What role and form does Public Art have in the City and its future/s? In imagining the city, ideas of community and culture, and their dynamic interrelations, can be obscured within a focus on physical and built forms. Artist John Vella’s public lecture will examine the matrix of Public Art in the contemporary city, with a focus on spatial practice. Drawing upon recent shifts in conceptions of ‘place-making’ that attempt to take greater account of socio-cultural dynamics, can spatial practice be imagined more broadly – as a platform and medium for dialogue in the city? For articulating ‘the right to the city’? For reconnecting people to place via…

What are you looking at? | David R. Marshall – Bernini’s Raimondi Chapel in S. Pietro in Montorio, Rome 1638–48

Fig 12 Raimondi Chapel. Photo by David R. Marshall

Bernini’s Raimondi Chapel in S. Pietro in Montorio, Rome 1638–48 David R. Marshall The Raimondi chapel in S. Pietro in Montorio is proof of the triumph of sculpture over painting. At 8.30am on a cold winter’s morning, when the church opens, it is the one well-lit part of the church (Fig. 1). Opposite, Sebastiano del Piombo’s Christ at the Column is plunged in gloom, from which it is barely rescued by artificial lighting (Fig. 2). To be sure it is a question of condition, but then the condition of the Raimondi chapel is not great either, with loose pieces of marble lying about, but it does not affect the experience. What stands out is the sarcophagus below the right hand…