Tag Archive for Sydney

Workshop | My Sydney: Writing Workshop led by Cathy Craigie | Sydney

Photographer Carol Ruff, ‘Detail of the original mural on Lawson Street’, South Sydney Herald, 11 November 2013

PART I: WALK AND TALK The workshop will begin at the 40 000 Years mural at the Redfern railway bridge (designed by Carol Ruff 1983) where Cathy will talk about her knowledge of and involvement with the mural. She will also discuss the history of Redfern and its surrounds, including her own longstanding family history in the area; and will tell tales of the inner city focusing on its ‘hidden histories’ (such as old trade routes underlying some of Sydney’s major arterial routes; lakes and waterways beneath its urban infrastructure; little-known pasts of the Town Hall, to name a few). Discussion will take place on foot, with a walk that departs from the mural and ends up at 107 Projects…

Workshop | Finding Country | Sydney College of the Arts

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Finding Country is an ongoing project initiated by Kevin O’Brien in 2006 and continuing as a pluralist contest between the idea of Aboriginal space (Country), and European space (property) in Australia. Aboriginal Country is excluded from the Australian city and even more so in the derivative architecture. Despite the 1992 landmark Mabo case High Court decision, a decision that struck down the doctrine of Terra Nullius (an empty land belonging to no-one), architecture in Australia continues its eighteenth-century European tradition of drawing on empty paper. The Finding Country position is that this paper is not empty, but is full of what can’t be seen. THE WORKSHOP – The workshop is focused on ways to empty the City in order to reveal a practical idea about Country.…

News | New Museum for the University of Sydney

An announcement from the Power Institute at the University of Sydney that a new museum will be built to display the University’s collections of art, archaeology and science. From the Power Institute Power is delighted to announce that plan to develop and build a new museum to unify and display the University’s rich collections in art, science and archaeology, has been officially approved. This will be a transformational project for all of us who research and teach art history, curating and museum studies here on campus. For Power, we believe it is a significant step forward for improving public access and engagement with the arts, and we will be supporting David Ellis, Ann Stephen and the team at the University Museums service…

Curating Feminism | A Contemporary Art and Feminism Event | Sydney

Image: Alice Lang Originals (2014).

Curating Feminism, a Contemporary Art and Feminism event is co-hosted by Sydney College of the Arts, School of Letters, Arts and Media, and The Power Institute, University of Sydney. The event will run over Thursday 23 October to Sunday 26 October, and will include an exhibition, masterclasses, conference and wikithon. See events for specific times and venues. Collectively, the event seeks to ask the following key questions: How can curating be an activist practice, especially in the realm of gender? What does it mean to be a feminist curator, or to adopt a feminist curatorial method? How does an emphasis on process, collaboration and negotiation help us imagine feminist curating?   Keynote Speakers Michael Birchall | Activism & Art: for the de-proletarianized petty…

Sydney Event | Jennifer Ferng on Jean-Jacques Lequeu’s Maison gothique (1777-1814)

Jean-Jacques Lequeu, Section perpendiculaire d'un souterrain de la maison gothique

Sensuality and the Subterranean: Jean-Jacques Lequeu’s Maison gothique (1777-1814) during the late Enlightenment Dr Jennifer Ferng, Lecturer Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning As one of the French utopian designers of the late Enlightenment, Lequeu is regarded by many architectural historians as having an enigmatic inventory of unbuilt work. He envisioned Grecian-Egyptian temples, Masonic grottoes, and neoclassical tombs and civic monuments. Enhanced by his training as a draughtsman, his studies of human anatomy verged on the edge of explicit prurience. This lecture surveys some of his fanciful imagery in relation to the intellectual discourses surrounding the subterranean, focusing on how myth and occult knowledge came to define his ideas of architecture and the body.Dr Jennifer Ferng is Lecturer in Architecture at the…

Workshops | Enlightenment Cosmopolitanisms and Sensibilities and Cosmopolitan Moments: Instances of Exchange in the Long Eighteenth Century Emerging Scholar Workshop | Sydney

Anicet Charles Gabriel Lemonnier, French, 1812, Salon de Madame Geoffrin, Oil on canvas, 51 x 77.2 in. MM 59.3.1

Two workshops on ideas of cosmopolitanism June 11-12 in Sydney. Enlightenment Cosmopolitanisms and Sensibilities The character of practiced cosmopolitanism during the Enlightenment often appears to amount to little more than an extension of early modern courtly internationalism infused with a new language of ideas. Further investigation reveals the desire on the part of Enlightenment cosmopolites to open borders in the name of economic, political, intellectual and artistic progress. This workshop explores cosmopolitanism in practice during the long eighteenth century in Europe and, through circulation, beyond its borders. It seeks out lived experiences of cosmopolitanism in the evidence of visual, social and textual expressions, and then asks how to interrogate this evidence. What were the opportunities through which border crossings became…

Update and Reminder | CFP for David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV

The Fountain of Love; Francois Boucher, French, 1703 - 1770; 1748; Oil on canvas

David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV 10-13 December 2014, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Keynotes are now confirmed and a reminder of the June 15 abstract deadline. Keynote Speakers John Dixon Hunt (University of Pennsylvania) | Sophia Rosenfeld (University of Virginia) | Michael McKeon (Rutgers University) | Erika Naginski (Harvard University) The Sydney Intellectual History Network and ‘Putting Periodisation to Use’ Research Group at the University of Sydney invite you to the Fifteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar (DNS), with the theme ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’. Inaugurated and supported by the National Library of Australia, the DNS conference is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century in a range of disciplines,…

Call for Papers | ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’ The Long Eighteenth Century (Down Under) | David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV

The Fountain of Love; Francois Boucher, French, 1703 - 1770; 1748; Oil on canvas

‘Ideas and Enlightenment’ – The Long Eighteenth Century (Down Under) David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV 10-13 December 2014, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Call for Papers The Sydney Intellectual History Network and ‘Putting Periodisation to Use’ Research Group at the University of Sydney invite you to the Fifteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar (DNS), with the theme ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’. Inaugurated and supported by the National Library of Australia, the DNS conference is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century (1688-1815) in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, the history of science, musicology, anthropology,…

Lecture | Dr Barbara Gaehtgens on Rembrandt’s Abduction of Ganymede | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Rembrandt van Rijn, The abduction of Ganymede, 1635, Gemaldegalerie, Dresden

Looking Closely: Interpreting Rembrandt’s Abduction of Ganymede Dr Barbara Gaehtgens An ‘Undoing the Ancient’ FASS Collaborative Research Group Event Special Lecture by Dr Barbara Gaehtgens The abduction of Ganymede 1635 – an early work by Rembrandt van Rijn – has puzzled many generations of Rembrandt scholars. The painting illustrates the classical Greek myth of the abduction of Ganymede, most beautiful of male mortals, by an eagle-guised Zeus, who desires the beautiful youth as his cup bearer. The theme was not new in art and had been represented by many other artists, including Michelangelo and Peter Paul Rubens. Rembrandt’s representation is unusual, however, in that Ganymede is not a beautiful, ephebic nude but a screaming, urinating toddler, dressed in a linen…

Seminar | Visual Manipulation and Auto/Biography | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Madame, Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate, Duchess of Orléans, in Hunting Dress by Louis-Ferdinand Elle, 1673 Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin

Visual Manipulation and Auto/Biography The first seminar for 2014 in Auto/Biography and History series sponsored by the Global Sensibilities Group within the Sydney Intellectual History Network at the University of Sydney. Barbara Gaehtgens | 1643 or How to Represent the Queen’s New Power? Mark De Vitis | Madame as the Marquise: The Politics of Making a Mockery at the Court of Louis XIV This seminar will combine the work of two art historians researching the visual self-representation of royal woman at the French court during the seventeenth century. Dr Gaehtgens (an independent scholar based at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles) explores how Anne of Austria used multiplied images as visual propaganda to change her image from a widowed…

Symposium | Art Gallery of NSW – Revolutionary ideas Perspectives on the building of an American nation

Image: Unknown artist Portrait of a black sailor (Paul Cuffe?) 1800 (detail), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, purchased with funds provided by Cecile Bartman via AGSNW website.

Symposium: Revolutionary ideas Perspectives on the building of an American nation This symposium considers the role of the visual arts and other forms of cultural expression in building an idea of nationhood in America from its foundation as a colony through the beginning of the 20th century. It addresses the aims of portraiture, the meanings of landscape, the rise of genre subjects and the significance of garden projects in the contexts of relationships with Britain, claims of independence, pivotal wars and moments of dramatic social change. Presented in conjunction with the Sydney Intellectual History Network at the University of Sydney Date: Saturday 16 November 2013, 10.30am Venue: Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Bookings: $65 non-member/ $50 member/ $30…

Lecture | Hero and Villain: Lafayette’s Legacies by Laura Auricchio

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Hero and Villain: Lafayette’s Legacies by Laura Auricchio Laura Auricchio, Associate Professor of Art History and Dean of the School of Undergraduate Studies at The New School in New York. Co-presented by Sydney University and the Sydney Intellectual History Network (SIHN@Sydney) Americans have long hailed the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) as an extraordinarily admirable figure – a wealthy French nobleman who, at the age of 19, volunteered to fight in the War of Independence and prodded his king to support the rebel cause. But in France, Lafayette is seen by partisans on both the left and the right as an opportunist, a misguided dreamer, even a traitor. In her talk, Auricchio will consider how Lafayette, a man who lived by a…

Symposium | Minimal, Conceptual, Pop: A symposium on American Art 1960–80

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The United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney is joining with the Art Gallery of New South Wales to mount an international symposium on the Gallery’s American art collections of the 60s and 70s. This period of radical experiment gave rise to many practices and aesthetics underpinning contemporary art. Enriched by the John Kaldor gift of 2009, the Gallery boasts the world’s finest museum collection of Sol Lewitt. Major pieces by Lewitt, Carl Andre, Christo, Donald Judd, Edward Ruscha, Richard Serra, Frank Stella and Laurence Weiner are on display during the symposium. Three leading American experts, Alexander Alberro (Columbia), Charles W. Haxthausen (Williams) and Robert Slifkin (NYU) will travel to Sydney for the event. They will be joined by…

19th International Symposium on Electronic Art, Sydney June 2013

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19th International Symposium on Electronic Art Sydney Australia, 7 – 16 June 2013 The 19th International Symposium on Electronic Art — presented by the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) and supported by Destination NSW to align with Vivid Sydney — will showcase the best media artworks and future-focused ideas from Australia and around the world Projects will take place at the Powerhouse Museum, The Rocks Pop-Up, Carriageworks, 107 Projects, the College of Fine Arts UNSW, COFA’s Kudos Gallery, Tin Sheds Gallery, Verge Gallery, UTS Gallery and DAB LAB, Artspace as well as at a Parramatta hub. Projects will also link to Darwin, the Tasmanian Wilderness and Indonesia to Sydney. The ISEA 2013 exhibition program will showcase the works of…

Symposium | Bacon’s Bodies

Three figures and a portrait 1975 oil and pastel on canvas, 198.1 × 147.3 cm; 217.5 × 166.8 × 9.8 cm (frame), Tate London, purchased 1977

Francis Bacon symposium: Bacon’s bodies Perspectives on the continuing significance of the art of Francis Bacon to coincide with the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ current exhibition Francis Bacon: five decades. This symposium considers the body as subject, the physicality of painting and the continuing significance of Francis Bacon’s body of work. Speakers will address this theme in relation to Bacon’s material practice, his studio (now preserved at Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane), as well as history, politics, food, and sexuality. Speakers Anthony Bond (director, curatorial Art Gallery of NSW & curator, Francis Bacon: five decades) | Nicholas Chare (Department of Gender Studies, University of Melbourne) | Barbara Dawson (director, Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane) | Andrew Durham…