Tag Archive for 17th Century Art

Exhibition Review | Italian Masterpieces from Spain’s Royal Court | Katrina Grant

Andrea di Lione Italian 1610–1685 Elephants in a circus (Gli Elefanti in un circo) c.1640 oil on canvas 229.0 x 231.0 cm Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid (P00091) Spanish Royal Collection

Italian Masterpieces from Spain’s Royal Court, Museo del Prado Reviewed by Katrina Grant The exhibition runs until until 31st August 2014 at the NGV International, St Kilda Rd. This exhibition tells two stories. The first is the story of Italian art from Raphael to Tiepolo and the second is the story of Spanish engagement with Italian art over this period. The exhibition highlights the close artistic relationship between Italy and Spain in the Early Modern period. It includes paintings that were directly commissioned by the Spanish Royal family from such…

Symposium | Italian Masterpieces from Spain’s Royal Court, Museo del Prado

Raphael, Holy Family with Saint John or Madonna of the Rose (Sacra Famiglia con san Giovannino o Madonna della Rosa) c.1517 oil on canvas 103.0 x 84.0 cm  Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid (P00302) Spanish Royal Collection

The National Gallery of Victoria is holding a public symposium to coincide with its upcoming exhibition Italian Masterpieces from Spain’s Royal Court, Museo del Prado. The symposium will include local and international experts on the art of the period. Each paper will delve into the main themes of the show. Date: 1:30 – 3:30pm, Friday 16th May, 2014 Venue: Clemenger BBDO Auditorium, NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road Bookings:  Ph +61 3 8662 1555, 10am-5pm daily or Cost $35 Adults / $28 Members / $30 C / $15 S (includes light refreshments,…

Lecture | Dr Barbara Gaehtgens on Rembrandt’s Abduction of Ganymede | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Rembrandt van Rijn, The abduction of Ganymede, 1635, Gemaldegalerie, Dresden

Looking Closely: Interpreting Rembrandt’s Abduction of Ganymede Dr Barbara Gaehtgens An ‘Undoing the Ancient’ FASS Collaborative Research Group Event Special Lecture by Dr Barbara Gaehtgens The abduction of Ganymede 1635 – an early work by Rembrandt van Rijn – has puzzled many generations of Rembrandt scholars. The painting illustrates the classical Greek myth of the abduction of Ganymede, most beautiful of male mortals, by an eagle-guised Zeus, who desires the beautiful youth as his cup bearer. The theme was not new in art and had been represented by many other…

Seminar | Visual Manipulation and Auto/Biography | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Madame, Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate, Duchess of Orléans, in Hunting Dress by Louis-Ferdinand Elle, 1673 Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin

Visual Manipulation and Auto/Biography The first seminar for 2014 in Auto/Biography and History series sponsored by the Global Sensibilities Group within the Sydney Intellectual History Network at the University of Sydney. Barbara Gaehtgens | 1643 or How to Represent the Queen’s New Power? Mark De Vitis | Madame as the Marquise: The Politics of Making a Mockery at the Court of Louis XIV This seminar will combine the work of two art historians researching the visual self-representation of royal woman at the French court during the seventeenth century. Dr Gaehtgens…

EVCS | Angelo Lo Conte, ‘Landscapes & Garlands of Flowers: an example of naturalistic Lombard devotion’.

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Angelo Lo Conte Landscapes & Garlands of Flowers: an example of naturalistic Lombard devotion. This paper explores the invention and the development of the garland of flowers in European art, characterizing it as an example of mutual synergy between Italian philosophy and Flemish art. During the second half of the sixteenth century, Christian philosophy was strongly influenced by figures such as Filippo Neri, Agostino Valier and Federico Borromeo, who introduced a second wave of Counter-Reformational thought based on an innovative, optimistic idea of the world and of mankind’s role in…

News | NGV 2014 Winter Masterpieces Revealed

Raphael (Italian, 1483–1520), 'Holy Family with Saint John' or 'Madonna of the Rose' ('Sacra Famiglia con San Giovannino' o 'Madonna della Rosa'), c. 1516. Oil on canvas, 103 x 84 cm. Museo del Prado, Madrid (P00302). Image courtesy Museo del Prado, Madrid.

Italian Masterpieces from Spain coming to Melbourne Mark Shepheard The National Gallery of Victoria today announced the 2014 Melbourne Winter Masterpieces exhibition: Italian Masterpieces from Spain’s Royal Court, Museo del Prado. This follows hot-on-the-heels of last year’s Portrait of Spain exhibition at the Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane (and also at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston) and again reflects the Museo del Prado’s new—and very welcome—initiative to broaden access to its holdings and strengthen its international profile. Another Prado show, then, but completely different from the Queensland/Houston exhibition, and exclusive…

Symposium | Iconoclasm | University of Melbourne, September 6th

Iconoclasm

ICONOCLASM – A Symposium Symposium to be chaired by Dr Gerard Vaughan, Gerry Higgins Professorial Fellow Conveners: Dr F Harley-McGowan, Gerry Higgins Lecturer in Medieval Art History  Dr Justin Clemens, Senior Lecturer, English School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne The history of images is inseparable from the history of the hostility towards images. In its most extreme expressions, this hostility can become an injunction to the breaking of all images: iconoclasm. Sometimes certain images or kinds of image have been banned from being made, circulated, or exhibited; sometimes…

Seminar | ‘Space, Memory, Narrative: The Oratorians and the Memorialization of San Filippo Neri in Rome, Florence and Naples’ Glenys L. Adams

Space, Memory, Narrative: The Oratorians and the Memorialization of San Filippo Neri in Rome, Florence and Naples Glenys L. Adams, University of Melbourne PhD Completion Seminar, Art History, School of Culture and Communication The Rooms of San Filippo Neri at the Roman Oratory in the church of Santa Maria in Vallicella (Chiesa Nuova) Rome were reconstructed between 1635 and 1643. This thesis is an examination of these rooms and argues that the relationship established between the architecture of the spaces, framed in relation to the carefully positioned relics, objects and…

Lecture | The passions of the soul – Emotion in the paintings of Nicholas Poussin , Lisa Beaven

Poussin, Massacre of the Innocents

The passions of the soul – Emotion in the paintings of Nicholas Poussin Lisa Beaven The restoration of the NGV’s Crossing of the Red Sea provides us with a timely opportunity to re-evaluate its creator, Nicolas Poussin. He is one of the most studied, but also one of the most misunderstood, of seventeenth-century artists. Traditionally he has been seen as a strict classicist who valued reason above all else. And yet in a series of paintings from the 1640s, such as Landscape with a man killed by a Snake, idyllic…

Seminar | La bella sirena: Portraits of female musicians in seventeenth-century Italy, Mark Shepheard

Bernardo Strozzi,	'A Viola da gamba Player (Barbara Strozzi)', c. 1640, Gemäldegalerie (Dresden, Germany)

La bella sirena: Portraits of female musicians in seventeenth-century Italy Mark Shepheard PhD Candidate in Art History in the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne The portrait of the musician in early modern Italy was intimately linked to the status of music-making as a profession. The confined role of women in public life denied many of them the opportunity to pursue music as a professional practise. Ecclesiastical institutions, one of the principal sources of employment for musicians, were firmly closed to women. Instead, female musicians were usually engaged…

UPDATED Lecture | The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey

Rembrandt, Suicide of Lucretia, oil on canvas, 1666, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

NB See details below for changed date and venue The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey, Bader Chair in Northern Baroque Art Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada Literary responses to paintings and prints by Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) and other artists of the early modern Netherlands show that art theorists and connoisseurs appreciated the artist’s ability to capture the emotional nuances of a subject. This lecture explores one fundamental aspect of emotional display, the shedding of tears, as represented…

Lecture | The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey

Rembrandt, Suicide of Lucretia, oil on canvas, 1666, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey, Bader Chair in Northern Baroque Art Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada Literary responses to paintings and prints by Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) and other artists of the early modern Netherlands show that art theorists and connoisseurs appreciated the artist’s ability to capture the emotional nuances of a subject. This lecture explores one fundamental aspect of emotional display, the shedding of tears, as represented in historical subjects and portraits. Visual and literary sources…

EVCS | A newly discovered late work by Artemisia Gentileschi: Susanna and the Elders (1652)

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European Visual Culture Seminar A newly discovered late work by Artemisia Gentileschi: Susanna and the Elders (1652) Adelina Modesti In 1652 Artemisia Gentileschi painted Susanna and the Elders, considered her last documented work, and believed lost. The painting has recently reappeared in the Pinacoteca Nazionale di Bologna with an attribution to the Baroque Bolognese artist Elisabetta Sirani, but identified as a work of Artemisia Gentileschi by the present speaker. This paper will explore the circumstances of the rediscovery, placing the work within the context of Gentileschi’s oeuvre, tracing its provenance…

What are you looking at? | Mark Shepheard – Nicolas Poussin, The Crossing of the Red Sea

Nicolas Poussin The Crossing of the Red Sea 1632-34  oil on canvas, 155.6 x 215.3 cm National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne  Felton Bequest, 1948

Nicolas Poussin, The Crossing of the Red Sea, 1633-34 National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Poussin’s Crossing of the Red Sea was once something of a problem painting. Indeed, its exact relationship to the pendant Adoration of the Golden Calf (National Gallery, London) has made great fodder for undergraduate essay questions. The two works, clearly related in content and—as we shall see—origin have often been seen as quite dissimilar in composition and style, and these differences were once taken to indicate that the two paintings date from slightly different periods in…

News | NGV unveils restored Poussin ‘The Crossing of the Red Sea’

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Today the National Gallery of Victoria unveiled Nicolas Poussin’s The Crossing of the Red Sea’ after an intensive, twelve-month conservation project. The painting is one of the NGV’s, and arguably Australia’s, finest European masterpieces. It was painted by Poussin in 1633-34 along with its companion piece The Adoration of the Golden Calf, which is housed in the National Gallery in London. The restoration project was sponsored by BNP Paribas Australia & New Zealand, who have for the past eighteen years helped to restore over two hundred paintings, including works from the Chateau…