News

Art and art history related news. Please send news item and media releases to Katrina Grant webmaster@melbourneartnetwork.com.au The decision of what news to publish lies with the editors and their decision is final.

Wednesday Art News Round Up | April 20th 2016 | David Hockney at NGV, Copyright Wins and Losses, etc

David Hockney, 'Self-portrait, 20 March 2012', iPad drawing, Collection of the artist © David Hockney

Yesterday the NGV announced their main exhibitions for the Spring and Sunmmer this year. The major summer exhibition at the NGV International will be a major solo exhibition of art by David Hockney (opening 11 November 2016 at NGV International). The exhibition, curated by the NGV in collaboration with David Hockney and his studio, will feature more than 700 works from the past decade of the artist’s career – some new and many never exhibted before in Australia. The exhibition will include paintings, digital drawings, photography and video works. One major work inclluded will be The Four Seasons, Woldgate Woods, a video work that shows the changing landscape of Hockney’s native Yorkshire, each season comprised of nine high-definition screens. Over at the NGV…

Wednesday Art News Round Up | April 13th 2016 | Caravaggio etc

The painting Judith Beheading Holofernes at its presentation in Paris. It may have been painted by Caravaggio (1571-1610) and could be worth €120m. Photograph: Charles Platiau/Reuters

The big art history news today is that in France a painting has surfaced that is being touted as the lost Caravaggio painting of Judith Beheading Holofernes, known to have been painted while he was in Naples after fleeing Rome. The expert touting the discovery, Eric Turquin (who is also a dealer) claims that the painting was found stashed away in an attic and has since undergone two years of cleaning and close examination. The story in the Guardian points out that Caravaggio expert Nicola Spinoza supposedly supports the attribution, whereas Mina Gregori does not. There is some suggestion the painting might be by the Flemish artist Louis Finson, a painter and art dealer who worked in Naples at the same time…

News | NGV attendance figures rank alongside major international museums

Image of visitro figures from the Art Newspaper

The annual Art Newspaper report on attendance figures always makes for interesting reading. There are the unsurprising results (the Louvre remains the most visited museum in the world with 8.6 million over the year), alongside the news that the NGV nabbed three positions in the list of the most popular Contemporary Art Exhibitions of 2015, with the David Shrigley exhibition in top place, followed by Carlo Amorales and Ryan Trecartin, and its Medieval Moderns (based on the NGV’s permanent collection) garnering over 350k visitors. All three were free exhibitions. As Michaela Boland in The Australian has already pointed out these figures are based on the numbers of visitors to the gallery while the exhibition was on, not on actual visitors to…

News | New publishing opportunities for art historians

Antwerp School, Prince Wladyslaw Zygmunt Vasa's Kunstkammer, The Royal Castle in Warsaw - Museum, inv. no. ZKW/2123, phot. Andrzej Ring, Lech Sandzewicz

Two academic presses have recently announced new series focused on art history and visual culture. Both seem to be spearheaded partly by ex-Ashgate editors, a silver lining to the sad end of those excellent series. Bloomsbury Publishing has announced that Margaret Michniewicz, formerly Commissioning Editor at Ashgate, will be developing a new publishing program of research monographs in visual culture and art history. From Bloomsbury: Bloomsbury is thrilled to welcome Margaret Michniewicz to our Editorial team to introduce a new type of research publishing for us in a general area where we already excel,” said US Academic Publishing Director Kevin Ohe. “Margaret brings with her deep experience working with a cohort of tremendous authors. She’ll help us add strength to…

Nominations for 2016 AAANZ Book and PhD prizes now open

AAANZ

The Art Association of Australia and New Zealand annual prizes recognise the best in arts writing and research across Australia and New Zealand. The awards cover a broad spectrum of arts publishing and acknowledge the contribution of both emerging and established scholars and artists. The categories include prizes for books, catalogues, artist books, Indigenous art writing, and an award for recently completed PhD graduates. The prizes are sponsored by a number of universities, art museums, associations and publishing bodies around Australia and New Zealand. The prizes recognise the following. Originality and rigour of scholarship. Contribution to knowledge in the area and impact on scholarly debate in the field. Significance of the topic to the field and to adjacent disciplines. Significance and originality of arts research. Quality…

News | Art at Australian Universities

IOna Potetr Museum of Art via Wikimedia Commons. By user Elekhh.

An interesting story in The Australian yesterday that highlights the significant collections of art held by our universities (and the large amount of art being made or performed within a university environment) and the unfortunate fact that the broader public is often unaware of them. Link to the full article here. The vast contribution of univer­sities to Australia’s cultural landscape through art and museum collections and the creation of new artistic works is not only under-appreciated by experts but goes largely unnoticed by the broader community, a new paper claims. “Universities are prolific collectors of artworks,” Jenny Wilson writes in a paper in the most ­recent edition of Australian Universities Review. They are also ­prolific creators of the arts, she says, noting that…

Publication | Discipline No. 4

Discipline

Congratulations to the Discipline team on another issue. Discipline No. 4 launches are being held in both Melbourne and Brisbane next week. Launch Melbourne Tuesday, 29th March 2016, 6:00–9:00pm | The Alderman, Melbourne Launch Brisbane Saturday, 2nd April 2016, 3:00–5:00pm | Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane Discipline is pleased to launch its fourth issue, published in December 2015. Edited by Nicholas Croggon, David Homewood and Helen Hughes, with a guest edited section by Ferdiansyah Thajib of KUNCI Cultural Studies Center in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, designed by Robert Milne, and eighteen months in the making, Discipline No. 4 features: Michael Ascroft, Amelia Barikin, Gordon Bennett, Rex Butler, Prihatmoko ‘Moki’ Catur, Centre for Style, Angus Cerini, John Citizen, Fiona Connor, Juan Davila, A.D.S. Donaldson, Giles…

Publication | Australian Institute for the Conservation of the Cultural Materials Conservation Bulletin

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The most recent issue of the Australian Institute for the Conservation of the Cultural Materials Conservation Bulletin is available now. This issue ranges from  Robyn Sloggett on national conservation policy to studies of Boorun’s Canoe by Steaphan Paton and Cameron Cope, of a work by Ron Mueck and of several paintings by the pioneering Singapore artist Georgette Chen. See Taylor & Francis online: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ybac20/current#.Vti54k3VyUk (You will need a subscription to read full text).   Robyn Sloggett  ‘A national conservation policy for a new millennium—building opportunity, extending capacity and securing integration in cultural materials conservation’ Susanna Collis ‘Revisiting conservation treatment methodologies for waterlogged archaeological wood: an Australian study’ Samantha Hamilton and Steaphan Paton ‘Boorun’s Canoe’ Amanda Pagliarino and Michael Marendy ‘Ron Mueck in…

News | Report on gender representation in the contemporary visual arts reveals continued imbalances

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To coincide with International Women’s Day NAVA has released a report on gender representation in the contemporary visual arts has been released today. What it reveals – that there is a continuing imbalance of power with men holding more positions at senior levels and male artists significantly better represented by commercial galleries – is hardly surprising to anyone working in the arts. Nonetheless, reports that bring together hard data on these issues are important and hopefully it prompts further discussion we continue to see these imbalances being addressed. As Tamara Winikoff, Executive Director of the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA) observes, ‘Despite the reputation of the arts as challenging outdated paradigms, it continues to fail on gender issues. Old habits die hard. We…

Threats to funding of the National Library of Australia’s ‘Trove’

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Disturbing news came out last week that proposed cuts to the budget of the National Library of Australia may threaten the future of Trove. While there are no threats to service as a whole, one effect of the cuts may be tat Trove will stop “aggregating content in Trove from museums and universities unless it is fully funded to do so.” There is also the possibility that digitisation of collections will slow down. These cuts follow years of funding cuts to our cultural institutions by both sides of government. This is seriously bad news for humanities researchers (among others), who rely on Trove as an easily accessible and very user-friendly ‘collection of collections’. Trove is free and available to anyone, anywhere in…

New website Art UK

View of Melbourne from the Botanic Gardens, Marianne North (1830–1890), 1880s.  Photo credit: Royal Botanic Garden, Kew.

The very successful Your Paintings website begun by the BBC and the Public Catalogue Foundation back in 2011 has been succeeded by a new website called ArtUK, now run by the Public Catalogue Foundation with support from the BBC. It is great to see such a useful website growing and expanding. Digital spaces that aggregate information from a  variety of collections are really important, gallery and museum databases are invaluable, but often as a researcher you aren’t sure what is held where, and your chances of knowing that there is, say, a small portrait by your artist held in a regional town hall might be pretty well zero. These aggregate websites are also especially important for image researchers as web search tools like…

News | The NotFair, Spring 1883 to continue in the absence of the Melbourne Art fair

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The Board of NotFair has confirmed that the 2016 NotFair will go ahead despite last week’s cancellation of the Melbourne Art Fair. The NotFair was begun in 2010 by artists Sam Leach and Tony Lloyd, with writer and curator Ashley Crawford. The event has always been independent of the main fair, giving artists and visitors a subversive alternative to the existing art fair model. It has always exhibited emerging, unrepresented and independent artists. This year it will go ahead without its establishment counterpart. Chairman of NotFair, The Hon. Paul Guest OAM QC is now expecting even more interest in the artist-focused event and said: “Of course we are disappointed to hear about the cancellation of Melbourne Art Fair, but for NotFair the show will definitely go on. We…

News | New appointments at Gertrude Contemporary as Director Emma Crimmings departs

Photo of Emma Crimmings, Mark Freary and Christine Tipton

Gertrude Contemporary has announced that two new appointments have been made as current Director Emma Crimmings prepares to depart for a new role at Artbank. Mark Freary will take on the role of Senior Curator, while Christine Tipton will take on the role of Director – Business and Operations. The new appointees will oversee Gertrude Contemporary’s move to their new location. From Gertrude Contemporary: Director Emma Crimmings, who will be leaving to take up the role of Assistant Director at Artbank in Melbourne, has played a significant role in the progress of the institution’s history. Emma’s vast experience across artistic disciplines, alongside her fundraising abilities working with the Board of Management, have helped to re-invigorate the organisation’s structural and financial stability,…

News | NGA releases report on their Asian Art Provenance project

Image of Goddess Durga statue

Last week the NGA published the results of their independent review of their Asian Art Provenance Project. The review followed the scandal over the 12th century Shiva statue that was revealed to be part of a cache of art looted from a temple and sold by now-disgraced New York art dealer Subhash Kapoor. The review has turned up a 22 objects with questionable provenance (including the already returned Shiva and the soon-to-be-returned Seated Buddha). The NGA director Gerard Vaughan said ‘I welcome Mrs Crennan’s independent assessment which clarifies the legal and ethical framework in which the NGA’s collecting should take place; this will prove invaluable for ongoing provenance-checking and comparative risk assessment. The review provides a clear set of guidelines which the NGA can incorporate into…

Recent News from Art and Art History | Monday 22nd February 2016

A forged catalogue that Drewe swapped with an original 1950s catalogue in the National Art Library. The forgery lists three Giacomettis, including forgeries by Myatt, one of which is illustrated. NAL: 38041010206480 © Victoria & Albert Museum, London

A fascinating blog from the V&A on the issues about conserving John Drewe’s fraudulent exhibition catalogues, which were forged and then planted in the National Art Library to create provenance’s for forged works of art. “How should we treat these fraudulent documents? Now they are in our collections and requested for exhibition are they artefacts in their own right? … As I looked at the catalogues with our lovely book conservators it dawned on us that if we were to be true to the history of the objects then we couldn’t actually do any work on them. The potentially damaging rusty staples, which we would ordinarily isolate or replace, should stay like that. John Drewe had worked hard to rust the staples,…