Tag: University of Melbourne

Talk | Anne Dunlop – Italy, the Mongol Empire, and Cangrande’s Silk Suit | University of Melbourne

Early Modern Circle 18 September – Professor Anne Dunlop, University of Melbourne Italy, the Mongol Empire, and Cangrande’s Silk Suit Monday 18 September at 6:15 pm in the North Theatre, Room 239 Old Arts, University of Melbourne. Abstract: When the tomb of the medieval ruler of Verona, Cangrande della Scala (ob. 1329), was opened in 1921, it was discovered that he had been buried in a hastily assembled outfit made from local and imported silks. His hat, cape, gown, and hose survived, more or less intact, along with fragments of other textiles. The major fabrics were from Central Asia, a testament to the international trade in textiles, from China to Northern Europe, in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, after the rise in the Mongol Empire. Yet despite intensive study, there are still disputes about where Cangrande’s silks were manufactured and how common…

Lecture | ‘Re-visiting Peter Lely’: a Dutch painter in seventeenth-century London – Diana Dethloff | University of Melbourne

Peter Lely's Portrait of Sir John Rous

The Dutch-born artist Peter Lely was an important figure in seventeenth-century British portrait painting. His position as Principal Painter at the court of Charles II, and his portraits of royal mistresses and privileged courtiers have, for many, come to define the Restoration period, as well as earning Lely the reputation of being nothing more than a fashionable face painter. This lecture aims to present a more balanced assessment of an artist who enjoyed a working life of almost forty years, only half of which were as royal painter, and examines Lely’s work during the earlier periods of English civil war and Commonwealth government, in addition to that for the Restoration Court. As well as arguing for a more balanced view of this interesting and prolific artist, this discussion will provide a useful context for the National Gallery of Victoria’s own Lely portrait…

Resource | Renaissance Manuscript Studies Collection at Allan & Maria Myers Academic Centre | St Mary’s and Newman Colleges

Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript Studies Collection Allan & Maria Myers Academic Centre | St Mary’s and Newman Colleges The University of Melbourne The Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript Studies Collection is located in the Allan & Maria Myers Academic Centre (nicknamed the “Accy”) jointly serving St Mary’s and Newman Colleges.  It is a specialist library assembled by Emeritus Professor Margaret Manion over her career teaching and researching on the history of the book before printing. The emphasis of the collection is on medieval liturgical and devotional book illumination; the relationship of text, decoration and illustration in illustrated manuscripts, and the interaction between social and patronal contexts and manuscript production. The objective of the Collection is to support teaching and research in Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts. It is available to Honours and Postgraduate students of the University of Melbourne and can also…

News | Ian McLean appointed to the Hugh Ramsay Chair of Australia Art History

More big news in art history appointments from the University of Melbourne with Ian McLean announced as the inaugural Hugh Ramsay Chair of Australian Art History, based in the Art History Program at the University of Melbourne.   Ian has published extensively on Australian art and particularly on Indigenous art. His books include Indigenous Archives: The Making and Unmaking of Aboriginal Art, with Darren Jorgensen (2017); Rattling Spears: A History of Indigenous Australian Art(2016); Double Desire: Transculturation and Indigenous art (2014); How Aborigines Invented the Idea of Contemporary Art (2011); White Aborigines Identity Politics in Australian Art (1998); and The Art of Gordon Bennett, with a chapter by Gordon Bennett (1996). He is a superb addition to the Art History Program, to Indigenous Studies, and to our School as a whole.   The Hugh Ramsay Chair of Australian Art History is an endowed Chair, based in…

Lecture | Cecilia Vicuña, About to Happen – Julia Bryan-Wilson | University of Melbourne

Associate Professor Julia Bryan-Wilson will give a lecture on Chilean artist and poet Cecilia Vicuña. Her lecture will discuss Vicuña’s sculptural work looking closely at her textile-based work from the 1970s to think through issues of production and materiality. Drawing on her forthcoming book, Fray: Art and Textile Politics, Julia Bryan-Wilson investigates how Vicuña’s use of knotted threads and strings signified politically during the Pinochet dictatorship and in relation to Andean systems of knowledge production. She explores a range of art and performance from several decades of Vicuña’s practice to illuminate how textiles unravel preconceived ideas about handicraft, industry, and memory. Julia Bryan-Wilson’s writing has appeared in Afterall, Aperture, Artforum, Art Journal, Bookforum, October, Oxford Art Journal, and Parkett. Her work centres on feminist and queer theory, artistic labour, performance, and craft histories. She is the author of Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War…

Baroque and golden age prints with Dr Miya Tokumitsu | University of Melbourne

This informal object-based learning seminar examines works of art from the Baillieu Library Print Collection first hand. European prints by artists such as Goltzius, Rembrandt and Rubens are spotlighted. The discussion will enhance our understanding of the technical and stylistic achievements of these major practitioners of the Baroque and Dutch golden age periods. Dr Tokumitsu is Lecturer Art History (Renaissance & Early Modern) and coordinator of the subject The Age of Golden Ages: Art in Europe. Please note that food, drink, bags and biros are not permitted near the works of art. Date: Thu. 6 April 2017, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm AEST Add to Calendar Venue: Leigh Scott Room, Level 1, Baillieu Library, Parkville Campus, UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, Free event, but registration required here: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/baroque-and-golden-age-prints-with-dr-miya-tokumitsu-tickets-32877269799

International Symposium | Parallel Histories: Nineteenth-Century Australian and American Landscape Painting |

The landscape of ideas, explorer artists, the pastoral arcadia of settlers, and the natural wilderness will be surveyed in Not As The Songs Of Other Lands exhibition at the Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne. Recalling sentimental landscapes in the manner of Claude Lorrain (1600-1682) and so-called ‘improved landscapes’ with the inclusion of mercantile, agricultural and industrial iconography, this Symposium will highlight the introduction of American theories of perception and visual representations of materiality and ideology in the landscape, especially when positioned alongside the Australian interpretation of Indigenous landscapes and cultures. There are many parallels to be found in the representation of such complex cultural heritage. This symposium will activate these ideas beyond the scope of the exhibition space. Join us as we examine the connections between the depiction of landscape, and the visual representation of myth and…

Seminar | Cabinet Secrets – Martha Pollak | University of Melbourne

This seminar, presented by Professor Martha Pollak, explores cabinets like those once owned by the diarist, ecologist, and wannabe urbanist John Evelyn in the context of the secretive inclinations of the mid-seventeenth century, and with the search for meaning in objects and nature. When the Victoria and Albert Museum recently reopened its early modern galleries of decorative arts, among the large objects stood John Evelyn’s imposing cabinet made of pietre dure and ebony (W24-1977). Its inclusion in the “European” rather than English galleries signified the position of the much-quoted diarist, ecologist, and wannabe urbanist as an influential traveller to the continent. This sizeable and costly piece of show furniture was not, however, the only such item that Evelyn had brought back in his clobber from the continent. A much more modest museum in London, the Geffrye (styled as the Museum of…

Lecture | “Post Platonism: Rethinking the Relations of Art, Love and Desire – Professor James Grantham Turner | University of Melbourne

This lecture explores the “erotic revolution” that swept through aesthetic theory and artistic practice in the sixteenth century. Early modern “sex-positive” polemic denounced the false shame that devalues physical, sexual love, and targeted neo-Platonism, with its fierce rejection of corporeal sexuality and bodily sensation. The lecture traces the evolution of interpretations of Platonic Eros, expressed through important semantic changes in words like “lascivious” and “libido”, suddenly used in a positive sense during this period. Platonic anti-corporeality was absolutely rejected; but elements of the Platonic image of a graduated ascent, rising up on a ladder by a series of “steps” to attain the highest form of Love, were retained, and even amplified. Professor James Grantham Turner holds the James D. Hart Chair in English at the University of California, Berkeley.  His books include The Politics of Landscape: Rural Scenery and Society in…

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love Wednesdays 12, 19, and 26 April, 6.00pm-8.30pm Love, a complex emotion to say the least, has inspired artists and creative practitioners for centuries, generating countless artworks, objects, poems, books, musical compositions and films. Over three weeks this masterclass will explore the materiality, visions and sounds of love in response to the exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800 held at the National Gallery of Victoria (March 31- June 18 2017); a collaborative project produced with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne. Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800 draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe. While popular conceptions of love tend to focus upon romantic love, Love: Art of…

Seminar | Garin Nugroho’s Satan Jawa: Remediating Art and History in Contemporary Indonesian film

Thursday 23rd February 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm From January to April, Asia TOPA: Asia-Pacific Triennal of Performing Arts will be held in Melbourne, an artistic celebration of Australia’s relations with contemporary Asia. One of the main goals of Asia TOPA is to foster cultural understanding between Australia and Indonesia (see https://www.asiatopa.com.au/about). One of the highlights of Asia TOPA is the film Satan Jawa by award-winning Indonesian filmmaker Garin Nugroho, a black and white film accompanied by live gamelan music. Satan Jawa was inspired by the German black and white silent cinema tradition, such as Nosferatu, as well as wayang kulit, the Indonesian shadow puppet theatre. Satan Jawa is an interdisciplinary production, merging filmmaking, music, dance, theatre, fashion and visual arts. Themes such as colonialism, magic realism, mysticism, mythology, and sensuality are set in a historical context. This panel discussion…

Online Resource | University of Melbourne Cultural Collections

The University of Melbourne has launched a new website dedicated to providing information about the objects in the university’s various collections, and information/suggestions on how these might be used in teaching across a variety of disciplines. The website is (unsurprisingly) primarily aimed at people teaching and studying at the University of Melbourne, but all information is readily available to anyone and the high-quality reproductions, potted histories of the objects, and links to further reading are likely to be of interest to a broader audience. You can browse the objects included here http://library.unimelb.edu.au/teachingobjects#home From the website: Teaching with unique collections provides resources, an online showcase, and a virtual setting for teaching and learning in many disciplines. It features objects, books, manuscripts, works of art and other items from the university’s Prints, Rare Books and Rare Music collections, Grainger Museum,  University of Melbourne Archives and Ian Potter Museum…

Lecture | Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda – Thai-Tanic-Three: Contemporary Thai Art in the Age of Constraints.

Photo of Professor Apinan Poshyananda

Professor Apinan Poshyananda will deliver the Keir Foundation Lecture on the emergence of Thai contemporary art. This lecture will close the three-day Symposium Regions of the Contemporary: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia, Saturday 5–Monday 7 November 2016, at the University of Melbourne. Free Public Lecture – All Welcome – Registration required as seating is limited. To register visit: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/keirfoundation Date: Monday, 7 November 2016, 3-4pm Venue: Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room, Level 1, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, Swanston Street, University of Melbourne Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda is former Permanent Secretary of Ministry of Culture, Thailand. He is art historian, critic, artist and curator who has been involved in Venice Biennale, Sydney Biennale, Istanbul Biennale, Liverpool Biennial, Yokohama Triennale, and Asia-Pacific Triennial. He was guest curator of Contemporary Art from Asia: Traditions/Tensions (New York, Vancouver, Perth, Taipei), Temple of the Mind…

Collaboratory | Art, Objects and Emotions | University of Melbourne

Conveners: Charles Zika and Angela Hesson ‘Art’ wrote Susanne Langer ‘is the objectification of feeling.’  A century earlier, Paul Cezanne had made the more extravagant claim ‘A work of art which did not begin in emotion is not art.’  Although the impulse to define art in such succinct and finite terms might be deemed an essentially modern one, the wider notion of the inseparability of art and emotion, and the power of art to evoke strong feelings in viewers has a long history. In more recent times scholars have also begun to explore the role of material objects in human relationships through their power to evoke strong emotions. Artistic and non-artistic objects can generate desire and also violence, pride, belonging, devotion and disgust. This collaboratory will consider the manifold ways in which art and objects depict, reflect, symbolise, communicate and…

Registration Open: Conference | Human Kind: Transforming Identity in British and Australian Portraits 1700-1914 | Melbourne September 8-11 2016

Joseph Wright of Derby Self-portrait 1765-68 Oil on canvas National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Gift of Alina Cade in memory of her husband Joseph Wright Cade, 2009

Registration is now open for Human Kind: Transforming Identity in British and Australian Portraits 1700-1914, presented by the University of Melbourne and the National Gallery of Victoria. This international conference will run from September 8 to 11 and will focus on British and Australian portraits between 1700 and 1914. Inspired by the outstanding collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, this interdisciplinary conference will be the largest gathering of international and Australian scholars to focus on portraits. It will provide a unique opportunity to explore both British and Australian portraits through a dynamic interchange between academics and curators. The keynote speakers are: David Solkin, Courtauld Institute of Art, London | Martin Myrone, Tate Britain, London | Kate Retford, Birkbeck, University of London | David Hansen, Australian National University, Canberra | Anna Gray, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. See the website for full abstracts for the keynote lectures. The full…