Tag: University of Melbourne

International Symposium | Parallel Histories: Nineteenth-Century Australian and American Landscape Painting |

The landscape of ideas, explorer artists, the pastoral arcadia of settlers, and the natural wilderness will be surveyed in Not As The Songs Of Other Lands exhibition at the Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne. Recalling sentimental landscapes in the manner of Claude Lorrain (1600-1682) and so-called ‘improved landscapes’ with the inclusion of mercantile, agricultural and industrial iconography, this Symposium will highlight the introduction of American theories of perception and visual representations of materiality and ideology in the landscape, especially when positioned alongside the Australian interpretation of Indigenous landscapes and cultures. There are many parallels to be found in the representation of such complex cultural heritage. This symposium will activate these ideas beyond the scope of the exhibition space. Join us as we examine the connections between the depiction of landscape, and the visual representation of myth and…

Seminar | Cabinet Secrets – Martha Pollak | University of Melbourne

This seminar, presented by Professor Martha Pollak, explores cabinets like those once owned by the diarist, ecologist, and wannabe urbanist John Evelyn in the context of the secretive inclinations of the mid-seventeenth century, and with the search for meaning in objects and nature. When the Victoria and Albert Museum recently reopened its early modern galleries of decorative arts, among the large objects stood John Evelyn’s imposing cabinet made of pietre dure and ebony (W24-1977). Its inclusion in the “European” rather than English galleries signified the position of the much-quoted diarist, ecologist, and wannabe urbanist as an influential traveller to the continent. This sizeable and costly piece of show furniture was not, however, the only such item that Evelyn had brought back in his clobber from the continent. A much more modest museum in London, the Geffrye (styled as the Museum of…

Lecture | “Post Platonism: Rethinking the Relations of Art, Love and Desire – Professor James Grantham Turner | University of Melbourne

This lecture explores the “erotic revolution” that swept through aesthetic theory and artistic practice in the sixteenth century. Early modern “sex-positive” polemic denounced the false shame that devalues physical, sexual love, and targeted neo-Platonism, with its fierce rejection of corporeal sexuality and bodily sensation. The lecture traces the evolution of interpretations of Platonic Eros, expressed through important semantic changes in words like “lascivious” and “libido”, suddenly used in a positive sense during this period. Platonic anti-corporeality was absolutely rejected; but elements of the Platonic image of a graduated ascent, rising up on a ladder by a series of “steps” to attain the highest form of Love, were retained, and even amplified. Professor James Grantham Turner holds the James D. Hart Chair in English at the University of California, Berkeley.  His books include The Politics of Landscape: Rural Scenery and Society in…

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love Wednesdays 12, 19, and 26 April, 6.00pm-8.30pm Love, a complex emotion to say the least, has inspired artists and creative practitioners for centuries, generating countless artworks, objects, poems, books, musical compositions and films. Over three weeks this masterclass will explore the materiality, visions and sounds of love in response to the exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800 held at the National Gallery of Victoria (March 31- June 18 2017); a collaborative project produced with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne. Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800 draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe. While popular conceptions of love tend to focus upon romantic love, Love: Art of…

Seminar | Garin Nugroho’s Satan Jawa: Remediating Art and History in Contemporary Indonesian film

Thursday 23rd February 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm From January to April, Asia TOPA: Asia-Pacific Triennal of Performing Arts will be held in Melbourne, an artistic celebration of Australia’s relations with contemporary Asia. One of the main goals of Asia TOPA is to foster cultural understanding between Australia and Indonesia (see https://www.asiatopa.com.au/about). One of the highlights of Asia TOPA is the film Satan Jawa by award-winning Indonesian filmmaker Garin Nugroho, a black and white film accompanied by live gamelan music. Satan Jawa was inspired by the German black and white silent cinema tradition, such as Nosferatu, as well as wayang kulit, the Indonesian shadow puppet theatre. Satan Jawa is an interdisciplinary production, merging filmmaking, music, dance, theatre, fashion and visual arts. Themes such as colonialism, magic realism, mysticism, mythology, and sensuality are set in a historical context. This panel discussion…

Online Resource | University of Melbourne Cultural Collections

The University of Melbourne has launched a new website dedicated to providing information about the objects in the university’s various collections, and information/suggestions on how these might be used in teaching across a variety of disciplines. The website is (unsurprisingly) primarily aimed at people teaching and studying at the University of Melbourne, but all information is readily available to anyone and the high-quality reproductions, potted histories of the objects, and links to further reading are likely to be of interest to a broader audience. You can browse the objects included here http://library.unimelb.edu.au/teachingobjects#home From the website: Teaching with unique collections provides resources, an online showcase, and a virtual setting for teaching and learning in many disciplines. It features objects, books, manuscripts, works of art and other items from the university’s Prints, Rare Books and Rare Music collections, Grainger Museum,  University of Melbourne Archives and Ian Potter Museum…

Lecture | Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda – Thai-Tanic-Three: Contemporary Thai Art in the Age of Constraints.

Photo of Professor Apinan Poshyananda

Professor Apinan Poshyananda will deliver the Keir Foundation Lecture on the emergence of Thai contemporary art. This lecture will close the three-day Symposium Regions of the Contemporary: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia, Saturday 5–Monday 7 November 2016, at the University of Melbourne. Free Public Lecture – All Welcome – Registration required as seating is limited. To register visit: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/keirfoundation Date: Monday, 7 November 2016, 3-4pm Venue: Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room, Level 1, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, Swanston Street, University of Melbourne Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda is former Permanent Secretary of Ministry of Culture, Thailand. He is art historian, critic, artist and curator who has been involved in Venice Biennale, Sydney Biennale, Istanbul Biennale, Liverpool Biennial, Yokohama Triennale, and Asia-Pacific Triennial. He was guest curator of Contemporary Art from Asia: Traditions/Tensions (New York, Vancouver, Perth, Taipei), Temple of the Mind…

Collaboratory | Art, Objects and Emotions | University of Melbourne

Conveners: Charles Zika and Angela Hesson ‘Art’ wrote Susanne Langer ‘is the objectification of feeling.’  A century earlier, Paul Cezanne had made the more extravagant claim ‘A work of art which did not begin in emotion is not art.’  Although the impulse to define art in such succinct and finite terms might be deemed an essentially modern one, the wider notion of the inseparability of art and emotion, and the power of art to evoke strong feelings in viewers has a long history. In more recent times scholars have also begun to explore the role of material objects in human relationships through their power to evoke strong emotions. Artistic and non-artistic objects can generate desire and also violence, pride, belonging, devotion and disgust. This collaboratory will consider the manifold ways in which art and objects depict, reflect, symbolise, communicate and…

Registration Open: Conference | Human Kind: Transforming Identity in British and Australian Portraits 1700-1914 | Melbourne September 8-11 2016

Joseph Wright of Derby Self-portrait 1765-68 Oil on canvas National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Gift of Alina Cade in memory of her husband Joseph Wright Cade, 2009

Registration is now open for Human Kind: Transforming Identity in British and Australian Portraits 1700-1914, presented by the University of Melbourne and the National Gallery of Victoria. This international conference will run from September 8 to 11 and will focus on British and Australian portraits between 1700 and 1914. Inspired by the outstanding collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, this interdisciplinary conference will be the largest gathering of international and Australian scholars to focus on portraits. It will provide a unique opportunity to explore both British and Australian portraits through a dynamic interchange between academics and curators. The keynote speakers are: David Solkin, Courtauld Institute of Art, London | Martin Myrone, Tate Britain, London | Kate Retford, Birkbeck, University of London | David Hansen, Australian National University, Canberra | Anna Gray, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. See the website for full abstracts for the keynote lectures. The full…

Duldig Sculpture Lecture | Sculpture and the Museum: From Fortunate Son to Runaway Child – Christopher Marshall | University of Melbourne

Image: Interior view, Gipsoteca canoviano, Possagno (Treviso)

In 2005, the Director of the National Gallery, London, signalled the long-standing eclipse of sculpture in favour of painting when he noted that “sculpture is what you fall over when you step back from the paintings”. The expanded field of contemporary sculptural practice, including installations, conceptual art and commissioned artist interventions, has nonetheless re-energised and revitalised the potential of sculpture to engage with the historical, institutional and even commercial dimensions of the museum. This lecture will consider the long and complex development from the Renaissance to today with a particular focus on the key role played by sculpture in communicating powerful ideas and associations when placed in dynamic museum exhibition environments. Date: 1 September 2016, 6:15-7:15 Venue: Forum Theatre, Level 1, Arts West Building, University of Melbourne Free to attend but registration required online: https://events.unimelb.edu.au/events/7318-sculpture-and-the-museum-from-fortunate-son-to-runaway-child Lecture introduced by Ken Scarlett OAM, Writer…

Masterclasses at Melbourne University | Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese | 17th September 2016 The Faculty of Arts, in association with the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, presents a one day masterclass on American director, producer, screenwriter, and film conservationist, Martin Scorsese in celebration of ACMI’s SCORSESE exhibition. The day will consist of two sessions focussing on Scorsese’s mastery of storytelling through creative process and collaborations. Each session will entail a lecture discussing specific films, followed by Q&A and discussion. A light lunch and course handout notes will be provided. SESSION DETAILS Session 1: Scorsese Sights, Sounds and the Manufacture of Emotion In this lecture Dr Mark Nicholls analyses clips from selected films and demonstrates the way Martin Scorsese tells his stories with actors and through his departments of photography, editing, sound and design. Scorsese’s films make a remarkable visual and aural impression on their audience. Matching…

Symposium | Hidden Traces of Shared History: Rethinking Asia Pacific through 19th and early 20th century photographs | University of Melbourne

Hidden Traces of Shared History: Rethinking Asia Pacific through 19th and early 20th century photographs | Academic Symposium 29 August 2016, 9:30am-4:30pm, Japanese Room, MSD Building Register here for the Symposium and Keynote attendance Keynote Address: Professor Geoffrey Batchen, Victoria University of Wellington 29 August 2016, 5:30-7:00pm, Singapore Theatre, MSD Building Register here for the Keynote Address attendance only This symposium brings together leading researchers who are working on 19th and early 20th century collections of Asia Pacific photographs. Alongside a broader consideration of the significance of the history of photography in the region, explorations of visual and built traces of identity formations, globalised trading and agricultural industrialisation, and the envisioning of modernity and nationalism during the late colonial era will be highlighted. The projects featured in the symposium demonstrate different modes of archival research and interpretation methods and a spectrum…

Masterclass | Greek Mythology – Religion and Art in Ancient Greece | University of Melbourne

Attic black-figure kylix with Dionysiac procession on sides and satyr in tondo c. 500 BCE Ceramic 8.0cm (H) x 25.0cm (W) x 18.5cm (D) The University of Melbourne Art Collection. Gift of David and Marion Adams, 2009. 2009.0233.000.000 © Reproduction enquiries should be forwarded to the Ian Potter Museum of Art

The Faculty of Arts, in partnership with The Ian Potter Museum of Art, present a four-part masterclass on Greek mythology and the significance of religion in daily life through the study of myths and ceramics. Each week case studies on figural vases from The University of Melbourne’s collection will be used to explore the relationship between religion and art in ancient Greece. Imagery, object function and use, and Greek mythology from an archaeological perspective will be examined. Supplementary material, such as coins, a variety of ancient ceramics, and teaching collection sherds will be used to illustrate the broader themes addressed in the program and related participatory activities. Participants will gain analytical skills by placing depictions of Greek mythology into a broader context of civic, cultural, and household significance; evaluate archaeological and art historical criteria relating to Greek mythology, and the significance of…

Talk | Digitalising the Roman Campagna | University of Melbourne

Detail of Giovani Battista Cingolani della Pergola’s 'Topografia Geometrica dell’Agro Romano' of 1704 , British School at Rome.

Collaborative Learning Room 356 Arts West In their presentation Lisa and Katrina will discuss the geo-mapping project, ‘Digitalising the Roman Campagna’, which is being developed in conjunction with the British School at Rome library. The aim ultimately is to create a digital map of the Roman Campagna that could function as a database and repository of information about both the classical and early modern Campagna. The aim is to take two rare, and rarely seen, maps of the Roman Campagna in the early modern period and transform them into new forms of technology and interdisciplinary resources for generations of scholars. The two maps digitalised so far are Giacomo Filippo Ameti’s ‘Il Lazio con le sue conspicue Strade Antiche e Moderne’ (1693), and Giovani Battista Cingolani della Pergola’s ‘Topografia Geometrica dell’Agro Romano’ of 1704 (second edition). One of the primary aims…

Lecture | The Art of Travel in the Name of Science – Sarah Thomas | University of Melbourne

This public lecture explores the significance of mobility to an understanding of visual culture in the colonial period with a particular focus on the works of art produced by British landscape painter William Westall (1781-1850) and Austrian botanical artist Ferdinand Bauer (1760-1826) on board Matthew Flinders’ inaugural circumnavigation of Australia between 1801 and 1803. Considering the status of the travelling artist as eyewitness in the period this paper will also examine the mobility of visual culture itself and the implications for art history in a globalised world. Date: Tuesday 16 August 2016, 6.30pm – 7.30pm Venue: Singapore Theatre, Melbourne School of Design, The University of Melbourne, PARKVILLE  VIC  3010 Admission is free | Bookings are required | Seating is limited To register visit: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/artoftravel