Tag: Landscape Painting

International Symposium | Parallel Histories: Nineteenth-Century Australian and American Landscape Painting |

The landscape of ideas, explorer artists, the pastoral arcadia of settlers, and the natural wilderness will be surveyed in Not As The Songs Of Other Lands exhibition at the Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne. Recalling sentimental landscapes in the manner of Claude Lorrain (1600-1682) and so-called ‘improved landscapes’ with the inclusion of mercantile, agricultural and industrial iconography, this Symposium will highlight the introduction of American theories of perception and visual representations of materiality and ideology in the landscape, especially when positioned alongside the Australian interpretation of Indigenous landscapes and cultures. There are many parallels to be found in the representation of such complex cultural heritage. This symposium will activate these ideas beyond the scope of the exhibition space. Join us as we examine the connections between the depiction of landscape, and the visual representation of myth and…

Symposium | Colonization & Wilderness: Nineteenth-Century American and Australian Landscape Painting | Art Gallery of Western Australia

Arthur Streeton Sirius Cove c1890 oil on cedar panel 12.0 x 22.3 cm State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia Purchased 1975

Colonization & Wilderness: Nineteenth-Century American and Australian Landscape Painting – 27-28 September 2016 An international symposium held at Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, convened by Emeritus Professor Richard Read An international symposium organised by the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and the Visual Arts, University of Western Australia, the Art Gallery of Western Australia and the Terra Foundation for American Art. This two-day symposium with leading scholars from America, Australia and Europe will provide innovative intercultural exchange on aesthetic and environmental issues prompted by thirty original American and Australian nineteenth-century landscape paintings brought together in Continental Shift (30 July 2016 – 5 February 2017), an exhibition from the collections of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, and the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth. The focus will be on the vexed relationship between environmental change and aesthetic innovation as colonial…

Lecture | Richard Wilson at 300 with Paul Spencer-Longhurst

Richard Wilson at 300 Dr Paul Spencer-Longhurst The artist Richard Wilson RA was born 300 years ago on 1 August 1713 or 1714. He grew up to become not only the leading British landscapist of his generation but one of the great artistic pioneers of the Eighteenth Century. Fourteen years older than his more famous contemporary, Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788), Wilson spent seven years in Italy and became highly popular in his own day – not least because he made of landscape painting something more than the merely topographical or descriptive. In his later years, however, for reasons that remain unclear, his reputation underwent a catastrophic decline, from which it recovered only slowly. Even today, how many of those who profess to admire Gainsborough, Turner and Constable have even heard of Wilson? To mark the Tercentenary of the artist’s birth the…

Exhibition Review | Monet’s Garden at the National Gallery of Victoria. Reviewed by David R. Marshall

The latest NGV exhibition is, again, sourced largely from a secondary French museum (the Musée Marmottan Monet, henceforth MMM). Monet exhibitions have traditionally draw large crowds, and are much loved by gallery directors needing to feed the political machines to which they are beholden that equate numbers with success. But if ‘Monet’ is the brand of brands for art exhibitions, for organisers there is the problem of finding new ways to give a Monet show intellectual credibility and thematic coherence, while marketeers may feel the need to enrich a brand that runs the risk of becoming stale. And, given the economics of international exhibitions in Australia, the bulk of the works need to come from a single source. Hence Monet’s Garden.

‘Monet’s Garden’ is an idea rich in possibilities: it connects cultural tourism (a trip to Giverny) with high-art glorification of artistic genius. While previous NGV exhibitions have emphasised, through videos, places associated with the objects on display (notably the Musée Moreau in the Moreau exhibition and Malmaison with Napoleon), Monet’s Garden takes the place/artwork nexus one step further. I once taught a subject in art history on the history of gardens called Visions of Paradise: Art of the Garden, a title stolen from a picture book by Marina Schinz, and did a week on Monet and Giverny. One of the essay questions was whether Monet was a better gardener than painter. This generated some interesting responses. By asking this question one is forced to look at his Giverny paintings differently: as topographical painting, subordinate to the place represented, rather than a this-is-a-work-of-genius painting. It is quite intriguing, after studying the now well-known colour photos of Monet in his garden nearest the house (e.g. pp. xxiv-xxv of the catalogue) (Fig. 1), to be able to identity what the paintings actually represent. The strength of Impressionism was that it accepted the facts and went from there, so that its underpinning of visual factuality is there if you choose to look. A visit to the waterlily pond at Giverny makes you realise that his Nymphéas paintings are much more realistic than you had thought when you saw them in a gallery (Figs. 3, 14). This helps us to see Monet differently: as the last of the estate topographers, rather than as a wannabee modernist abstractionist.

What are you looking at? | Ruth Pullin – Eugene von Guérard’s ‘Mr John King’s station’

A hidden story: Eugene von Guérard’s Mr John King’s station, 1861 Ruth Pullin With the closing of the National Gallery of Victoria’s touring exhibition Eugene von Guérard: nature revealed in Canberra in July of this year it is timely to reconsider rarely seen works in the light of the close analysis made possible by the exhibition. The enigmatic Mr John King’s station 1861 (Fig. 1), not seen in Australia since 1980 and now returned to its private owners in the UK, is a work that, with its inherent ambiguities and seemingly unresolvable questions, invites renewed attention. Nothing is quite as it seems in Mr John King’s station. Conceived within a compositional and ideological framework derived from the classical European landscape tradition the painting appears to endorse the values and the social and economic concerns of the European landowner. But from…

NGV Short Course | Fred Williams

NGV Short Course: Fred Williams To coincide with the exhibition Fred WIlliams: Infinite Horizons the NGV has organised a series of taks by local and interstate speakers over three Saturday afternoons in May. ABout the Exhibition Fred Williams pioneered a new vision of the Australian landscape, and became one of the most important Australian artists of the twentieth century. This exhibition highlights Williams’ strength as a painter including important oil paintings and luminous gouaches to reveal his distinctive approach. He sought inspiration from the unique landscapes of places such Upwey in Victoria, Tasmania’s Bass Strait and the arid Pilbara region of Western Australia, drawing on the abstract potential of this vast country. Although Williams is often associated with dry environments, this exhibition also presents his fascination with water – ponds, rivers,waterfalls and seascapes. Also of great interest are the portraits of…

Exhibition – Sea of Dreams: The Lure of Port Phillip Bay 1830-1914

Sea of Dreams: The Lure of Port Phillip Bay 1830-1914 Opens at the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery Wednesday 7 December 10am Shattered dreams, fresh beginnings, an expansive economy, rising fears and the emergence of a middle class are detailed in this rich display that traces the journeys of so many who were lured by the dream of a better life. Sea of dreams tells the fascinating story of Port Phillip Bay and the integral part it played in 19th and early 20th century survival, settlement, trade and commerce, defence and leisure. With more than 100 works displayed, many of Australia’s best known and loved artists are represented. There are paintings by Charles Conder, Fred McCubbin, Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton and Louis Buvelot, along with rare drawings and prints by Emma Minnie Boyd, S. T. Gill, Georgiana McCrae, John Mather and Eugene…

EVCS: David R. Marshall ‘Eugene Von Guérard and Daylesford: His Paintings for W.E. Stanbridge’

David R. Marshall Eugene Von Guérard and Daylesford: His Paintings for W.E. Stanbridge This paper, which arises from research for the catalogue for Ruth Pullin’s Eugene Von Guérard exhibition, currently on display at the NGV, examines Von Guérard’s views of the Daylesford district and their preparatory studies. It explores the interaction between Von Guérard’s training as a topographical artist in Italy and Germany and the picturesque mindset of the colonial public to whom his paintings were addressed. It also looks at the role of W.E. Stanbridge of Wombat Park as patron. Date: 6:30pm, Monday 2nd May Venue: Room 150 Elisabeth Murdoch Building, University of Melbourne, Parkville All Welcome Drinks and nibbles provided (gold coin donation appreciated). The seminar will be followed by dinner in Lygon St. Please RSVP Mark Shepheard (shepm@unimelb.edu.au) if you plan to join us for dinner.

Symposium: Scientific perspectives and the landscapes of Eugene von Guérard

Symposium, NGV International Scientific perspectives and the landscapes of Eugene von Guérard To coincide with the major exhibition Eugene von Guérard: Nature Revealed. Reflecting von Guérard’s own engagement with the sciences, this symposium will bring together a range of specialists from different disciplines to discuss von Guérard and the Australian landscape. Specialists in the earth sciences, science historians as well as art historians will present a fascinating array of papers. New material about the artist will also be presented. Registation from 9.15am 10am Reflections of von Guérard, his patrons and the art market, Dr Gerard Vaughan, Director, NGV 10.20am Eugene von Guérard and the future of landscape painting, Ruth Pullin, Guest Curator, NGV 10.50am Science, art and Humboldtian ambitions in mid-19th-century Australia, Rod Home, Professor Emeritus, History and Philosophy of Science, The University of Melbourne 11.20am Morning tea 11.50am Truth…