Tag: University of Sydney

Scholarship | The Judith Neilson Scholarship in Contemporary Art at University of Sydney

The Judith Neilson Scholarship in Contemporary Art Applications close 22 May 2018. The Judith Neilson Scholarship in Contemporary Art has been established to support the study of contemporary Chinese art in its global contexts. The Scholarship provides support for full-time doctoral study to be undertaken through the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney. We invite applications from highly motivated individuals interested in engaging deeply with issues related to contemporary Chinese art, global art cultures, and transcultural studies. Prospective students must possess demonstrable research skills, high proficiency in writing in English, and academic experience in one or more of the following fields: art history and theory, Chinese studies, visual culture, and/or curatorial studies. Proficiency in Chinese is strongly preferred. Applications that demonstrate potential for engagement with the White Rabbit Collection are encouraged. For further information, please refer to…

Lecture | Contemporary Art and the Contemporary Art Museum, Shanghai and its Biennale – John Clark | University of Sydney

Image of Mu Boyan, Fatty Series, shown at the Eighth Shanghai Biennale in 2010

Modern and contemporary art is founded on a pre-history of art types and concepts of the modern which in the case of Shanghai go back to the 1850s. The Shanghai Biennale emerges in 2005 from this historical dynamic which is marked in the 2000s by several stages of building new, large art museums of contemporary art. The way the state, large collectors and corporations provided these museums and the extent to which their exhibitions were influenced by the Shanghai Biennale, by international art works and notions of curatorial practice, form the principal, intertwined subjects of this paper. The role of spectacular spaces in requiring spectacular art works, and the subsequent ‘Biennalization’ of private museum art practices is also examined, together with some suggestions made about the way Biennales might develop in future. Emeritus Professor John Clark John Clark, is Professor…

Call for Papers | Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories | Sydney October 2017

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories | An international symposium hosted by the Power Institute, University of Sydney, Australia, 11–13 October 2017 Proposals due 28 February 2017 Studies focused on gender in Southeast Asian societies have emerged, in recent decades, in approximate concurrence with the development of regionally focused Southeast Asian art histories. The founding premise of this international symposium is that there has hitherto been insufficient discursive intersection between these two fields. Topics discussed may include: 1. Accounts of individual artists and collectives whose work engages with gender; 2. Investigations of gender in the exhibitionary, critical, and historiographical receptions of works of art, from any period 3. Considerations of the relationships between artists and/or works of art and larger Southeast Asian cultural constructs of gender, as enacted in political, economic, religious and other domains. Proposals will be particularly welcomed for papers…

Three lectures at the Power Institute | Frédéric Ogée, Tamar Garb and Sheridan Palmer

Three lectures at the Power Institute in Sydney over the next three weeks by interstate and international guest speakers.  Frédéric Ogée Hogarth’s Bodies Thursday 20 October, 6.00pm In his choice of subjects and in his painting technique, William Hogarth’s rendering of ‘life’ is remarkable for its tangible physicality. In this lecture, Professor Ogée argues that Hogarthian beauty and grace, far from being abstract concepts or resulting from the formal application of a set of rules, emerge as transient, ‘living’, physical phenomena, apprehended by the beholder through visual representations of the bodies’ natural and ‘peculiar’ movements. Frédéric Ogée is Professor of British Literature and Art History at Université Paris Diderot. Philosophy Room S249 The Quadrangle The University of Sydney, Camperdown Campus REGISTER Tamar Garb Painting/Photography/Politics: Marlene Dumas and the Figuration of Difference Wednesday 26 October, 6.00pm Professor Garb’s lecture focuses on Dutch/South African Marlene Dumas’ reworking of…

4A Symposium – Twenty Years | University of Sydney and Power Institute

To celebrate its twentieth birthday, on 4 November Sydney’s 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art will stage a major symposium event Twenty Years at the University of Sydney with support from the Power Institute, the Asian Australian Studies Research Network and the China Studies Centre. Twenty Years brings together those who have played a role in the development of 4A as a leader in Asian contemporary art in Australia since 1996. Discussion on the past, present and future work of 4A will be led by artists, curators and academics. A keynote presentation by Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS Map Curator, Middle East and North Africa, will be followed by an in-conversation between Raza and Edmund Capon, OBE AM, Chair of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Speakers confirmed for the symposium include: Abdul Abdullah, Dr Ien Ang, Alex Bowen, Prof. Mark Ledbury (Director…

Lectures | David Solkin and Mark Hallett on British Eighteenth-Century Art | University of Sydney

The Power Institute is pleased to present two lectures on British art of the eighteenth century, by Professors David Solkin and Mark Hallett. David Solkin – English or European? Portraiture and the Politics of National Identity in Early Georgian Britain Professor Solkin’s lecture examines a fundamental shift in British portraiture during the reign of George II, which saw painters and patrons turn away from the established native heritage of Van Dyck, Lely, and Sir Godfrey Kneller, in favour of embracing the latest trends in Continental art practice. Spearheading this development were several immigrant European portraitists, led by Jean-Baptiste Van Loo, who found himself overwhelmed with business after moving to London in the later 1730s; here his rivals included a small number of English and Scottish ‘face-painters’ (notably Allan Ramsay) who had gone abroad to acquire a patina of cosmopolitan polish, as…

Lecture | A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? – Eugene Y. Wang | University of Sydney

A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? Professor Eugene Y. Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, Harvard University This lecture is also being presented in Melbourne, see this post for further information. This lecture, by renowned scholar of Asian Art, Eugene Wang, will consider the coming together of Western artistic traditions and traditional Chinese culture and legend. As Professor Wang explains in the introduction to his presentation: The daughter of a prehistorical sage-king, so an ancient Chinese tale goes, is accidentally drowned in the Eastern Sea. Her afterlife spirit turns into a vengeful bird with a mission. She picks up—one at a time—a piece of wood or rock from the Western mountains, flies east, and drops it into the Eastern Sea—a drop in the ocean. This way, she would, so…

Symposium | Photography.Ontology.Symposium | University of Sydney, June 2016

Based at the University of Sydney the Photographic Cultures Research Group partners with the Art and the Document Research Cluster at Sydney College of the Arts to profile research into the photographic. The Photography.Ontology.Symposium takes place on 2 and 3 June 2016 at the University of Sydney. Photography.Ontology.Symposium. engages in critical debate with international scholars and specialists on the photographic medium. It will explore the relationship between photography’s ontology, the camera as a human perceptual apparatus and the unconscious through themes of evidence, the archive, photographic practice and theory. Dates: 2-3 June 2016 Venue: University of Sydney Keynotes: Shawn Michelle Smith and Andrés Zervigón Plenary Address: Melissa Miles Speakers: Katherine Biber, Donna West Brett, Helen Grace, John di Stefano, Danie Mellor and Toni Ross. For more information and to register visit the website: http://www.photographiccultures.com/symposium-1/#symposium2016 The Symposium is co-presented by Sydney Ideas, The…

Sydney Art History Lecture and Seminar | Alexander Nagel

Professor Alexander Nagel from New York University is giving a lecture and a special research workshop in Sydney next week. Lecture | The Renaissance Elsewhere 10 March, 2016, 6-7.30pm Co-presented by the Power Institute and Sydney Ideas Italian art in the period between ca. 1300 and ca. 1500 – what is called the Renaissance – is characterized by its extraordinary openness to the world. The Renaissance represented items and ideas not only in direct proximity to artists of the time, but also distant peoples and places known to artists only through textual accounts, oral reports, drawings, imported objects and other images. Western Christian art was oriented elsewhere due to its unique position at a distinct remove from the origins of its religion, and far to the west of the centres of culture as Latin Christians understood it. It is difficult…

Lecture | Patricia Simons at the University of Sydney

Image: Tintoretto, Susanna and the Elders. Circa 1555. Vienna, Kunsthistorsiches Museum.

Professor Patricia Simons will also be presenting her lecture on Susannah and the Elders at the University of Sydney. See the information for her Melbourne lecture here. 21 March, 2016, 6-7.30pm Jacopo Tintoretto’s ‘Susanna and the Elders’ is commonly read as a case of male voyeurism, in subject and purpose, or as mere moralizing allegory. This lecture moves away from each reductive extreme by re-examining the story’s history and visual effect. Patricia Simons is Professor of Art History, University of Michigan. Her field of study includes the art of Renaissance Europe (primarily Italy, France and the Netherlands) with a special focus on the representation of gender and sexuality. This is a free public lecture open to all with online registrations required. Register on the University of Sydney website. Venue: Mills Lecture Theatre 209, RC Mills Building, the University of Sydney Contact: Ira…

Symposium | Asian Art Research in Australia and New Zealand: Past, Present, Future | University of Sydney

Date: 15 October 2015 A day-long symposium presented by the Power Institute and Department of Art History, at the University of Sydney ABSTRACT Since at least the 1940s, Asia has become an increasingly important point of orientation for Australia and New Zealand: politically, economically, demographically, and, of course, culturally. In this context, there has long been strong public interest in Asian art, sustaining dedicated galleries, significant original exhibitions, specialist organisations, arts festivals, and numerous exchange programmes. Nonetheless, the study of Asian art in Australia and New Zealand appears stubbornly diffuse. Australia and New Zealand boast successive generations of specialists working as educators, curators, researchers, artists, and ever growing numbers of students, yet we often remain separated by discipline, geography, institutional structures, and the variable resources that characterize local museum and library collections. Asian Art Research in Australia and New Zealand:…

Research Day in 18th Century Studies at the University of Sydney

Topic: 18th Century Philosophy in Dialogue Date: 28 August 2015 The Sydney Intellectual History Network (SIHN) is sponsoring a Research Day in Eighteenth-Century Studies at the University of Sydney on 28 August 2015. The event supports the efforts of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies (ANZSECS) in building a new community of scholars and postgraduate studies from a broad range of disciplines within the humanities. The Research Day will begin with an interdisciplinary panel discussion with experts from a number of fields speaking on the relationships between philosophy, music, literature, art and architecture during the eighteenth century. Led by Dalia Nassar (Philosophy), the panel features visiting scholar Justin Smith (Université Paris Diderot – Paris VII) engaged in discussion with Jennifer Ferng (Architecture), Alan Maddox (Musicology), Jennifer Milam (Art History) and Matthew Sussman (English Literature). Postgraduate students will then…

Symposium | Paul Klee in Peace and War: Tunisia and the German Home Front 1914-18 | Sydney

Paul Klee in Peace and War: Tunisia and the German Home Front 1914-18 22 July 2014, Art Gallery of NSW Proudly presented by The Power Institute, The University of Sydney with the generous support of the Consulate General of Switzerland, Sydney and the Art Gallery of New South Wales. This forum, convened by Professor Roger Benjamin, will bring together an international panel to celebrate the centenary of Paul Klee’s famous voyage to Tunisia. Claimed by the artist himself as his ‘breakthrough to colour’, the Tunisian trip of April 1914 elicited brilliant work from Klee and his colleagues August Macke and Louis Moilliet. The artists transformed the genre of Orientalism by adapting the aesthetics of Cubism and the high-colour art of the Blue Rider and Orphist avant-gardes to the North African scene. The ancient Islamic capital of Kairouan became the focus…

Lecture | The Ruination of Everything: Joseph Pennell, America and Illustration before the Great War – Eric Segal | Sydney University

The Ruination of Everything: Joseph Pennell, America and Illustration before the Great War Eric Segal The Power Institute with Sydney Ideas is proud to present a talk by Eric Segal, of the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida. Segal’s presentation will focus on the artist Joseph Pennell (U.S.A. 1857-1926). Pennell worked throughout Europe and England illustrating Old World cities and landscapes, whist at the same time rendering great American works of architecture and engineering. His dedication to a shabby Europe of the past and a gleaming New-World modernity, reflected contradictions and disappointments in his chauvinistic concerns about the faltering course of American cultural progress. The talk will explore how Pennell tied together thinking about the preservation of art, encroaching immigration and “wonders” of engineering, in an untidy package that led to complex and sometimes explosive…

Public Lectures | Melissa Hyde and Richard Taws | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Two lectures on eighteenth and nineteenth-century French art history in Sydney in June. Painted Women in the Age of Madame de Pompadour | Melissa Hyde In this lecture, Prof Melissa Hyde considers the role that cosmetics played in the court politics and social identities of women at the court of Versailles. Focusing largely on portraits of the most famous mistresses of Louis XV, Madame de Pompadour and Madame du Barry, Hyde will discuss ‘making up’ the face as a symbolic practice. The lecture also considers the historical irony and significance of Madame Du Barry’s eventual refusal of rouge. For the artist, François-Hubert Drouais and Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, who portrayed Pompadour, Du Barry and Marie-Antoinette after them, the problem of depicting an unpainted, natural face through inherently artificial painterly means presented something of a paradox. The lecture also looks at how artists…