Tag: Arts Funding

News | Victorian Government announces $3million for Collingwood Contemporary Arts Precinct

The disused Collingwood tech site is set to become a contemporary arts precinct, with support from the Victorian Government. Minister for Creative Industries Martin Foley MP today announced $3 million, as part of the Government’s Creative State strategy, alongside $4.5 million in donations and $4 million already contributed by the State. The announcement heralds the next stage of the creative transformation of the former Collingwood Technical School in Johnston Street. The long abandoned school was given a new lease on life in 2010 when it was earmarked for a new home for Circus Oz. In 2014 Circus Oz moved in to its state-of-the-art new facility occupying 60% of the 10,000sqm site. In a partnership, the Government is working with a social enterprise, Contemporary Arts Precincts (CAP) to redevelop the three triple storey buildings, and spaces including a large leafy courtyard.…

Panel Discussion | The trouble with remuneration: the tricky business of being an artist | West Space

THIS TUESDAY 5th July: Panel Discussion – The trouble with remuneration: the tricky business of being an artist   In conjunction with West Space’s exhibition, The Trouble with Remuneration, there will be a panel discussion to explore different ways artists are engaged with contemporary economic realities: as survival, as challenge, as resistance, as opportunity. Speakers: Janet Burchill, Masato Takasaka, Debris Facility and Beth Rose Caird. Chaired by: Jan Bryant. Date: Tuesday 5th July 2016 – 6pm Venue: West Space – Level 1, 225 Bourke St Melbourne RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/panel-discussion-the-trouble-with-remuneration-the-tricky-business-of-being-an-artist-tickets-26125648518 Janet Burchill is a Melbourne-based visual artist. Masato Takasaka is a Melbourne-based artist, known for both his performances as a lead guitarist in über-hip rock bands as well as his visual art practice. Takasaka thinks about his studio practice in musical terms, describing his aesthetic as an iPod Shuffle on endless repeat: playing the greatest…

Arts Funding and the 2016 Federal Election

For the first time that I can remember Arts Funding has been a Federal Election issue (this article from Ben Eltham is a reminder that arts and culture barely rated a mention in 2013). This year there have been stories every week and we even saw a National Arts Debate between representatives of each major party. There wre a number of other forums where politicians, artists and others discussed the many issues surrounding arts funding and making a living in the arts. Although arts funding has no doubt been foremost in many of our minds, the fact that the Coalition has not released an arts policy suggests it is hardly foremost in their minds. It is also unfortunate that the reason it has turned into an issue is not because our potential leaders have broad and expansive visions for the arts…

Wednesday News Round Up | 29th June 2016 | Arts Funding, Brexit, SCA and UNSW merger + more

News The Daily Review has come out with an editorial saying that ‘A Vote for the Coalition is a Vote against the Arts’ and with Arts Minister Mitch Fifield yet to release an arts policy and only the coalition’s past performance on arts funding (de-funding more like it) it’s a pretty straightforward claim. I am aiming to a pre-election round-up on Friday of all the latest arts funding news and debates and links to the policies of the main parties (where they exist…). The protests over cuts have been making international news with stories in Hyperallergic and Apollo Magazine. The other major news is the recently announced merger of the Sydney College of Art with UNSW. The VCA’s Su Baker has a great opinion piece in The Australian where she makes the point that the SCA has been punching well above its weight and…

Wednesday News Round Up | 15th June 2016 | Writing about art, Arts Funding, Australian Museum Director’s salaries + more

A new column from Burnaway will examine ‘Artspeak’ – the first column takes apart that the arts press release, the forum where I personally read some of most breathlessly nonsensical statements about art. Matthew Terrell observes that ‘A bit of simple explanation goes a long way in engaging the public. Tell us what it is: a dance show, an art installation, a DJ performance, an online event, etc. Don’t overinflate your words until your sentences are bulging at the seams. Keep it short. Keep it simple. Keep it clear.’ Yes! Fisun Güner in the Spectator observes that good art writing is not necessarily simple, while she agrees that ‘art-speak should be blasted, I dread the spread of the far more cynical and bland approach’ of dumbed-down accessible writing. Pac Pobric’s review of Liam Gillick’s new book Industry and Intelligence, drawing…

Wednesday Art News Round-up | 18th May 2016 |

Happy International Museum Day! The big news in the arts over the past week was the new of who missed out on renewed funding from teh Australia Council, after the funding budget was drastically cut to create the new Catalyst funding program. Below are some of the main stories and analysis, we are obviously still in the midst of the fall-out from this, though unfortunately arts and the funding of it doesn’t look to be much on the radar of the election campaign, though at least one new party wants to change this – the newly registered Arts Party, led by Sydney-based artist PJ Collins, will take a stand for the arts, cultural life and creative industries of Australia. Collins, who co-founded the party with Nicholas Gledhill back in 2013, says that “forming a political party to support the sector…

News | ArtsPeak calls for restoration of Australia Council Funding

A press release from ArtsPeak yesterday calls on the government to restore funding to the arts. “With the Federal election looming, ArtsPeak is calling for the restoration of Australia Council funding as a matter of urgency so that the Australian arts ecology can remain viable and vibrant. This call was made unanimously by 2700 individuals and organisations in submissions to last year’s Senate inquiry into arts funding, the largest ever response to such an inquiry.” The full release is below and is online here: ArtsPeak, the national confederation of peak arts and cultural organisations, says the Australian arts ecology is under serious threat following the announcement of four-year funding decisions by the Australia Council. Sixty-five previously funded organisations have lost funding for their core operations and of the 262 applications to the round, over half were not funded. It seems clear…

Wednesday Art News Round Up | May 11th 2016 | Arts Funding, Leonardo madness, those Aussie posters + more

A great piece from the sporadically posting but always entertaining Grumpy Art historian on reviewing the reviewers. He takes issue with the gushing nonsense becoming increasingly common in reviews of art exhibitions and the way that they really don’t engage critically with much of the art or exhibitions that they profess to review (the piece is also a very good review in and of itself of the current royal Academy Giorgione exhibition). A thoughtful article by William Scates Frances on those ‘Aussie’ posters by artist Peter Drew that have been popping up around the streets of Australian cities. He points out that taking these images of historical figures and simply labeling them as Aussie raises (or ignores) broader issues and ends up sweeping ‘racist histories’ under the rug by projecting ‘acceptance back into the past.’ This week in ‘anything about Leonardo…

News | Draft Guidelines released for National Program of Excellence in the Arts

The draft guidelines for the new NPEA were released yesterday. The draft suggests that, amongst otehr things, some funding allocations will be kept secret, that groups asking for funding from the NPEA will also be expected to attract private funding, and that it wil not, under any circumastance, fund video games despite (as Alison Croggon wryly pointed out on twitter) that fact that the guidelines demand ‘audience appeal’. The minister will have the final word on all funding from teh NPEA. More detail from Ben Eltham in Crikey (subscribers only), who also points out that neither Rupert Myer or Robyn Archer have been reappointed as directors of the Australia Council. See also Nancy Groves’ overview in The Guardian here.

Conference | Re-structure 2014

Budget cuts proposed by the Abbott government have instigated a proliferation of restructures across the public sector. These restructures will have far reaching impacts on culture and education. The Centre for Creative Arts at La Trobe University is organising a conference to discuss the current re-structuring in the arts, culture, creative sector in Australia. This conference looks at the current state of the arts, and considers alternative modes of culture and knowledge production within times of shrinking public expenditures. Featuring participants from performance, fashion, creative arts, gaming, media and community intervention, the event explores both broader sustainable strategies as well as “clever partial solutions” to cultural and knowledge production in a post-public sector environment. In seeking alternatives, the Re-structure 2014 looks to the proliferation of smaller scale community economies worldwide, in both on and offline environments, and to the modes of cultural production and knowledge exchange with other…