Scholarship | The Judith Neilson Scholarship in Contemporary Art at University of Sydney

The Judith Neilson Scholarship in Contemporary Art Applications close 22 May 2018. The Judith Neilson Scholarship in Contemporary Art has been established to support the study of contemporary Chinese art in its global contexts. The Scholarship provides support for full-time doctoral study to be undertaken through the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney. We invite applications from highly motivated individuals interested in engaging deeply with issues related to contemporary Chinese art, global art cultures, and transcultural studies. Prospective students must possess demonstrable research skills, high proficiency in writing in English, and academic experience in one or more of the following fields: art history and theory, Chinese studies, visual culture, and/or curatorial studies. Proficiency in Chinese is strongly preferred. Applications that demonstrate potential for engagement with the White Rabbit Collection are encouraged. For further information, please refer to…

Job | Gallery Curator | Bus Projects

Applications due midnight (AEDT) 26 March 2018. The Gallery Curator (0.6 FTE) works collaboratively with the Director and Program Coordinator to develop and implement the annual program of exhibitions, public programs and publishing projects. The Gallery Curator will confidently liaise with a variety of stakeholders, including the general public, emerging and established artists, curators and writers, on the planning and realisation of a broad range of exhibitions and creative projects. More information: https://busprojects.org.au/footer/positions-vacant Position Description (PDF): https://busprojects.org.au/content/footer/1-positions-vacant/2018_curator_pd_bus_projects.pdf Applicants must provide the following via email (PDF): 2-page letter addressing the Key Selection Criteria and a current curriculum vitae with the names and contact details of two professional referees. Address applications to channon@busprojects.org.au Attn: The Director, Bus Projects Bus Projects is committed to being an equal opportunity workplace and an affirmative action employer. We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, culturally, religiously and…

Lecture | Things Fall Apart – Putting the world back together one document at a time – Robyn Sloggett | University of Melbourne

Faculty of Arts Dean’s Lecture: ‘Things Fall Apart’ – Putting the world back together one document at a time The world as we know it swirls around us as objects, ideas and aspirations. How we make sense of it is dependent on what we have access to, what we can imagine and how we are enabled to think, learn and do. The loss, degradation, or inauthenticity of cultural material threatens the security of our knowledge and the construction of identity, and community that is unable to access its cultural, historic and scientific records is impeded in its ability to construct relevant and effective cultural futures. Conversely, a well-secured cultural record assists a community to tell its stories, understand its past, and cement its identity into the future. Taking Chinua Achebe’s 1958 novel as the point of departure, in this lecture…

Seminar | Engaging with landscape and heritage through playful methods – Phil Jones | Deakin Cultural Heritage Seminar Series

Engaging with landscape and heritage through playful methods – Phil Jones (University of Birmingham) Visiting a heritage landscape is very different to learning about the same site second-hand through text and images. An embodied, multisensory, engagement enhances emotional and affectual connections to the histories that such sites bear witness to. This paper discusses a series of methodological tools that can be used to examine the embodied connection between people and place, uncovering both tangible and intangible histories. Three approaches in particular are reflected upon: the use of smartphones to crowdsource materials gathered in-place; arts-based urban transects; and biosensing as a tool for examining the emotional unconscious. The potentials and limitations of each are discussed, with an emphasis on methodological triangulation, combining novel and more conventional techniques to gain rounded insights into how people understand landscape and heritage. Phil Jones is…

News | Tapestry Design Prize for Architects 2018

Hosted by the Australian Tapestry Workshop (ATW) the Tapestry Design Prize for Architects (TDPA) is the only international tapestry award for architects. The TDPA invites architects from around the world to design a tapestry for a hypothetical site. Boullée’s mooted building that inspired the Pharos Wing, MONA, has been announced as the TDPA 2018 hypothetical site on Tuesday 20 March 2018.   MONA was designed by Fender Katsalidis Architects to house David Walsh’s extraordinary collection of old and new art.  ‘MONA is both visionary and breath-taking; David Walsh’s brief for the TDPA 2018 will challenge architects creatively and their understanding of the intersection between tapestry and space’, says Antonia Syme, Director, Australian Tapestry Workshop. Entries are now open and close Friday 15 June. Finalists will be announced in July with the winners announced Thursday 16 August 2018, with an exhibition…

Call for Papers | Comité international d’histoire de l’art (CIHA) Colloquium in New Delhi November 2018

Comité international d’histoire de l’art (CIHA) | Colloquium in New Delhi – 28th-30th november 2018 Website: http://cihaindia2018.in/ Deadline: 7 May 2018 ART, DESIGN & SOCIETY Art and design are intrinsic to all forms with aesthetic value. In the modern world, the dichotomy between art and design was created by the socio-political and economic changes that were brought about by the industrial revolution and colonization. This has led to the paradoxical paradigm wherein the utilitarian designs of the past are perceived as art in the present and are displayed in museum spaces. In countries like India, art institutions are products of colonialism which aimed at instilling western values leading to the collapse of traditional structures of art creation, dissemination and consumption. The living traditions of indigenous, popular and ritual art which formed the major corpus of artistic production in societies worldwide…

Colony: Australia 1770-1861 and Colony: Frontier Wars Exhibition Opening Programs Saturday 17th March | NGV Australia

For the opening weekend of Colony: Australia 1770-1861 and Colony: Frontier Wars the NGV is hosting a series of talks and performances on Saturday 17th March. See the website: https://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/program-series/colony-opening-weekend/ COLONY: AUSTRALIA 1770–1861 Drawing from public and private collections across the country, Colony: Australia 1770–1861 brings together the most important examples of art and design produced during this period and surveys the key settlements and development of life and culture in the colonies. Importantly, the exhibition acknowledges the impact of European settlement on Indigenous communities. COLONY: FRONTIER WARS Colony: Frontier Wars explores the period of colonisation in Australia from 1788 onwards and its often devastating effects on First Peoples. The period, that was to many the discovery of a ‘wondrous’ southern continent, was to others an invasion of homelands occupied for many millennia. This powerful exhibition reveals some of what…

Writing & Concepts | Working the Room: Some notes on Exhibition-Making – John Meade | Collingwood Arts Precinct

John Meade presents: “Working the Room: Some notes on Exhibition-Making” Sat 17 March 3:00pm @ Collingwood Arts Precinct 35 Johnston Street, Collingwood VIC 30066 Website WRITING & CONCEPTS JOHN MEADE is a Melbourne based artist who graduated from the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne, in 1994. His recent solo exhibitions include, Set Pieces (2016) and Autumn 2014, both at Sutton Gallery Melbourne. Through 2010/2011, a NETS survey exhibition curated by Zara Stanhope, Objects to Live By: The Art of John Meade, toured six regional and city public galleries throughout Australia. Other solo exhibitions include, The Desultory Arabesque (2012), Show Business (2009) and Aftermath (2005), all at Sutton Gallery Melbourne; Incident in the Museum 2 (2004), at the Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, and Propulsion (2001), at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney and the…

Opening Event for Bundoora Homestead Art Centre’s two new exhibitions – We and Accession.

IMAGES: L-R Briony Galligan | Nothing incarnadine (detail) | 2016 | teak hands made in collaboration with Lejar Budiharjo from Carving Arts Studio in Jogja Calling | 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney | Photo: Courtesy of artist. Claire McArdle | The Missing Parrot | 2016 | hand carved second hand hammers | Darebin Art Collection.

Exhibition Opening Join us at the opening and hear from leading art critic, art historian and curator Sasha Grishin AM FAHA. The exhibition opening will include a Welcome to Country and Smoking Ceremony. WHEN: Saturday 17 March | 2-4pm COST: Free | includes refreshments BOOKINGS: not required, all welcome Website: http://www.bundoorahomestead.com/whats-on/ We We explores emerging contemporary artists with studios in the Darebin municipality. These artists have diverse practices that critically engage with installation, site, sound, video, performance, text, photography, painting and sculpture. They have studios in Northcote and Preston at Artery Cooperative, Beaconsfield Parade Studios, Arts Project Australia and Gertrude Contemporary. Featuring: Julian Aubrey Smith, Beth Caird, Georgina Criddle, Saskia Doherty, Briony Galligan, Jethro Harcourt, Rosie Isaac, Warren O’Brien and Lucreccia Quintanilla. Curated by Renee Cosgrave. Accession Accession presents recent acquisitions to the Darebin Art Collection representative of a cross-section of Australian contemporary…

Visiting Fellowship at ANU’s Humanities Research Centre for 2019

Applications for the 2019 Humanities Research Centre Visiting Fellowship Program – on the theme of ‘Crisis!’ – are now open. 2019 Theme – Crisis! Mobilised as a defining characteristic of the contemporary condition, ‘crisis’ often functions as a way to mark out a critical ‘moment of truth’ or rupture. Alternatively, it is offered as a tool with which to understand the category of ‘history’, or to differentiate the past from a conflicted present. For some, crisis has become a state of ordinary ambivalence, a constant and unresolvable feature of the status quo. Forming a background to these debates is the escalating chorus of ‘crisis’ texts in popular and academic contexts alike. In this growth industry – richly illustrated by images of violent protest and reform, by news of corruption, incompetence, and injustice, and by consecutive environmental disasters – the urgency…