Category: News

Art and art history related news. Please send news item and media releases to Katrina Grant webmaster@melbourneartnetwork.com.au The decision of what news to publish lies with the editors and their decision is final.

Monash University Museum of Art Reopens

Monash University Museum of Art Reopens with Launch Exhibition ‘Change’ The Monash Museum of Art has unveiled their new home with an exhibition entitled Change (27 October – 18 December). The new site is at Monash University’s Caulfield campus and includes a range of gallery spaces, a sculpture court, a public sculpture by Callum Morton, and a series of  ‘distinctive threshold spaces’ including the camopy, spine and light-well. The museum was designed by Kerstin Thompson Architects. The new design provides increased gallery space and will allow the museum to present an expanded program of exhibitions, special projects, education and public programs, as well as displaying works from the Monash University collection, which includes over 1800 works. The launch exhibition showcases this collection with works from the 1960s to the present day. Artist’s represented include John Brack, Charles Blackman, John Perceval,…

News | Kenneth Reed Bequest for the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Kenneth Reed Bequest for the Art Gallery of New South Wales Katrina Grant Kenneth Reed, a Sydney-based lawyer, has announced that  he will bequeath a substantial collection of old master paintings, as well as collections of Italian Maiolica and eighteenth-century European porcelain to the Art Gallery of New South Wales. There are more than 70 items in total and the bequest will represent a significant addition to the gallery’s European collection. The paintings include a large number of landscapes – including view paintings and architectural capricci – several portraits and several religious a scenes. The most significant is perhaps the fully finished sketch or modello by the seventeenth-century painter Andrea Camassei ‘St Peter in prison baptising Saintss Processus and Martinian’ (c. 1630-1), which he painted in preparation for an altarpiece in fresco at St Peter’s in Rome. The fresco was…

News: Digitised Manuscripts Website Launched by British Library

Digitised Manuscripts Website Launched by British Library The British Library has launched a Digitised Manuscripts site. It features full coverage of 284 Greek manuscripts drawn from the library’s Additional and Harley manuscript collections. The manuscripts, dating from the sixth to the 18th centuries, encompass a wide range of literary, historical, biblical, liturgical and scientific texts. Some of the manuscripts are beautifully illuminated, including an artistic highlight of the collection, the Theodore Psalter (Add. MS 19352). Apparently this is part of an 18 month project, the site will continued to be enhanced and new content will be added over this period. It is a pilot for wider plans by the library to digitise all the medieval and early manuscript collections. Further details can be found here. In recent years the British Library has begun putting its collection online. Other digitsiation projects…

News: Online books and a guide to some online databases

Gutenberg-e online books Columbia University Press has a new site where it is publishing e-monographs. Gutenberg-e (not to be confused with Project Gutenberg) is an open access site that publishes award-winning dissertations as e-books. It appears that Gutenberg-e aims to “offer elements that cannot be conveyed in print: extensive documentation, hyperlinks to supplementary literature, images, music, video, and links to related web sites”. Of interest to art historians is Robert Kirkbride’s Architecture and Memory: The Renaissance Studioli of Federico da Montefeltro, which can be read here. The book has also been recently reviewed by Saundra Weddle on H-net. __________ JISC Collections JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) recently launched a page that acts as an introduction to their online resources. From here you can search across collections and browse the different collections. The collections have a UK focus but are likely…

Vale Bill Kent

It is with regret that we have learned of the death of Emeritus Professor Francis William (Bill) Kent on 30th August 2010. Professor Kent was the Founding Director of Monash University Prato Centre (2000-2004) and then Professor of History and Australian Professorial Fellow at the School of Historical Studies, Monash University. Bill was one of the great Italian Renaissance historians, and a world authority on Lorenzo the Magnificent. He was a great supporter of art history and a friend to art historians. A Bill Kent Foundation has been established to honour his memory. Details can be found to the following website: http://www.monash.edu.au/giving/news/billkent.html

New look Melbourne Art Network

We have recently upgraded the website for the Melbourne Art Network. We hope that you will find it easier to navigate and easier to locate information that you are interested in. The address remains the same at http://melbourneartnetwork.com.au What you will find on the new look Melbourne Art Network: Content: Notices We will continue to post calls-for-papers, details of funding and scholarships, and art, and art history-related events both  in Melbourne and elsewhere. You can now quickly find these organised according to categories by way of the lower menu at the top of the page. We encourage our readers to send in details of  events, calls-for-papers and funding that may be of interest. Content: Opinion, Reviews and Commentary The new website will post reviews of new art, art history, architecture, and garden history books as well reviews of exhibitions both…

Melbourne Prints online

Two new websites have just been launched that detail Melbourne based research into Early Modern prints. These websites have been developed with the assistance of a Scholarly Innovation Information Grant from the Baillieu Library. MELBOURNE PRINTS  – http://melbourneprints.wordpress.com/ The ‘Melbourne Prints’ website is being used to showcase a range of rare early modern books and prints held in the Baillieu Library. The aim of the site is to document and deepen knowledge of the content, material production and provenance of these cultural objects; to enable students from different disciplines to learn about methods and processes of their storage, conservation and display; to make this knowledge more accessible; to understand the material condition of these objects, as well as the nature of conservation, ongoing maintenance, storage and display; and to publicize the material to other students and scholars locally, nationally and…

New Database: Payments to Artists – 17th-Century Rome

A new database has been launched based on the research of Richard Spear for his recent book Painting for Profit: The Economic Lives of Seventeenth-Century Italian Painters (see this earlier post for details on the book). The database is described on the Getty website as follows: Artists’ wealth, like that of most Renaissance and Baroque painters, was principally derived from what they earned selling their art. Data that documents payments to artists—as opposed to resale prices or inventory evaluations—is the primary means for analyzing the socioeconomic lives of painters in early modern Europe. This online database contains approximately 1,000 payments recorded in Rome between 1576 and 1711. Information concerning painters active in Rome for a small portion of their careers is limited to their Roman phase. Richard Spear gathered this set of data in order to write the Rome section…

Volunteering opportunity at the Johnston Collection of Fine and Decorative Arts

The Johnston Collection, Museum of Fine and Decorative Arts in East Melbourne is inviting applications from anyone interested in becoming a voluntary guide. Successful applicants will be required to take part in an intensive 12 session training programme to be held on 12 successive Mondays commencing 19 July 2010. For further information and an application form contact The Johnston Collection. Telephone: 9416 2515 email: wrjohnston@bigpond.com Website: http://www.johnstoncollection.org/

News: Art Gallery of South Australia Announces New Director

Last week the Chairman of the Art Gallery of South Australia, Michael Abbott QC, announced that Nick Mitzevich would be the new Director of the Gallery. The previous director, Christopher Menz, resigned from the post in January this year. Nick Mitzevich is currently the Director of the University of Queensland Art Museum in Brisbane and was formerly Director of the Newcastle Region Art Gallery. At forty years old, Mr Mitzevich is the youngest person to assume the role of Director in the Art Gallery of South Australia’s 129 year history. Nick Mitzevich said, “It is an honour to have been selected as the new Director. The Art Gallery of South Australia has a dynamic history which is most inspiring and I look forward to enhancing the extraordinary collection and continuing to enlighten, surprise and stimulate visitors with accessible and thoughtful…

BHA to continue with free access for all

The Getty has announced on their site that the Bibliography of the History of Art (BHA) will continue to operate. They state that: Since ending its collaboration with the Institut de l’Information Scientifique et Technique (INIST)–CNRS in December 2007, the Getty has been searching for partners to continue the production and distribution of BHA. This process has been complicated, and with no suitable arrangement immediately available, the Getty decided to act on its commitment to the scholarly community by providing access to BHA directly from its own Web site. It can  now be accessed via their website free of charge at http://library.getty.edu/bha. Free Web access to BHA will be an advantage to those who previously could not access it as they didn’t have an institutional subscription. The database search includes both BHA (covering 1990-2007) and the International Bibliography of Art…

New Book ‘The Possessions of a Cardinal Politics, Piety, and Art, 1450–1700′

The Possessions of a Cardinal: Politics, Piety, and Art, 1450–1700 Edited by Mary Hollingsworth and Carol M. Richardson Cardinals occupied a unique place in the world of early modern Europe, their distinctive red hats the visible signs not only of impressive careers at the highest rank the pope could bestow, but also of their high social status and political influence on an international scale. Appointed for life, these princes of the Church played a key role in the dramatic events during a period in which both the power and the authority of the papacy were challenged. Cardinals crossed the ambiguous boundaries then existing between religious and secular power. Granted unparalleled access to Church and private property, they spent considerable time, money, and effort on making the best collections of art and antiquities. Some commissioned artworks in churches that advertised their…

Tables of Contents of open access art history journals

There is a blog that tracks the Tables of Contents of online, open access art history journals. The author of the site state that: The aim of this blog is to collect the TOCs of new issues of open access journals in the field of art history. “Art history” is conceived here in a rather narrow sense. Although the header contains tabs like “Contemporary Art & Theory” or “Architecture” too, a comprehensive outlook on these fields is not intended. Periodicals of related disciplines are evaluated only if they have some art historical material too, this may however change in the future. You can visit the site here and subscribe to its feed, you can also follow it on twitter.

Bibliography of the History of Art to cease at the end of March

It appears that the Bibliography of the History of Art is to fold at the end of this month due to cost cutting at the Getty. The Cornell University Library reports that: For a number of years, the Getty Research Institute has maintained the database, Bibliography of the History of Art (BHA). Cornell has been able to license access to that database via OCLC’s First Search platform. Due to the economic crisis, the Getty took the radical step last summer of declining to continue the BHA. On Friday, March 5, we received notification that our licensed access to the BHA will continue through March 31, 2010. The BHA is the decisive periodical citation index for art history scholarship, and this is certainly a very unfortunate decision. Many of us had been holding out hope that another entity would be willing…

JSTOR Auction catalogues online – open access till June 2010

JSTOR is collaborating with the Frick Collection and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in a pilot project funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to understand how auction catalogs can be best preserved for the long-term and made most easily accessible for scholarly use. Auction catalogs are vital for provenance research as well as for the study of art markets and the history of collecting. This prototype site is open to the public through June 2010. If you are interested in this content and the importance to art research, you are encouraged to try the site and take a brief survey. In June, we will evaluate use of the content and the feedback we have received in order to help determine the future of the resource. http://auctioncatalogs.jstor.org/