Category: Sydney Events

Workshops | Enlightenment Cosmopolitanisms and Sensibilities and Cosmopolitan Moments: Instances of Exchange in the Long Eighteenth Century Emerging Scholar Workshop | Sydney

Two workshops on ideas of cosmopolitanism June 11-12 in Sydney. Enlightenment Cosmopolitanisms and Sensibilities The character of practiced cosmopolitanism during the Enlightenment often appears to amount to little more than an extension of early modern courtly internationalism infused with a new language of ideas. Further investigation reveals the desire on the part of Enlightenment cosmopolites to open borders in the name of economic, political, intellectual and artistic progress. This workshop explores cosmopolitanism in practice during the long eighteenth century in Europe and, through circulation, beyond its borders. It seeks out lived experiences of cosmopolitanism in the evidence of visual, social and textual expressions, and then asks how to interrogate this evidence. What were the opportunities through which border crossings became fixed in the minds of participants and observers? How was Enlightenment cosmopolitanism in practice inflected with different forms of sensibility?…

Public Lectures | Melissa Hyde and Richard Taws | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Two lectures on eighteenth and nineteenth-century French art history in Sydney in June. Painted Women in the Age of Madame de Pompadour | Melissa Hyde In this lecture, Prof Melissa Hyde considers the role that cosmetics played in the court politics and social identities of women at the court of Versailles. Focusing largely on portraits of the most famous mistresses of Louis XV, Madame de Pompadour and Madame du Barry, Hyde will discuss ‘making up’ the face as a symbolic practice. The lecture also considers the historical irony and significance of Madame Du Barry’s eventual refusal of rouge. For the artist, François-Hubert Drouais and Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, who portrayed Pompadour, Du Barry and Marie-Antoinette after them, the problem of depicting an unpainted, natural face through inherently artificial painterly means presented something of a paradox. The lecture also looks at how artists…

Call for Papers | ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’ The Long Eighteenth Century (Down Under) | David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV

‘Ideas and Enlightenment’ – The Long Eighteenth Century (Down Under) David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV 10-13 December 2014, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Call for Papers The Sydney Intellectual History Network and ‘Putting Periodisation to Use’ Research Group at the University of Sydney invite you to the Fifteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar (DNS), with the theme ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’. Inaugurated and supported by the National Library of Australia, the DNS conference is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century (1688-1815) in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, the history of science, musicology, anthropology, archaeology and studies of material culture. We welcome proposals for papers or panels on the following topics, although please note…

Lecture | Professor Thomas W. Gaehtgens, Director, The Getty Research Institute | Sydney University

Professor Thomas W. Gaehtgens, Director, The Getty Research Institute The Power Institute and Sydney Ideas are proud to present a lecture by internationally respected art scholar and historian, and Director of the Getty Research Institute, Professor Thomas W. Gaehtgens. In his presentation, Professor Gaehtgens will share insights from his seven years at the helm of the Getty Research Institute, one of the world’s most preeminent research centers for arts and culture. In particular, Professor Gaehtgens will discuss the work of the Getty Research Institute with regard to its global commitment to research and scholarly resources. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear Professor Gaehtgens speak, and to learn how a leading institution such as the Getty successfully dedicates itself to advancing further knowledge and understanding within the field of visual arts. The Getty Research Institute is an operating program of…

Lecture | Dr Barbara Gaehtgens on Rembrandt’s Abduction of Ganymede | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Looking Closely: Interpreting Rembrandt’s Abduction of Ganymede Dr Barbara Gaehtgens An ‘Undoing the Ancient’ FASS Collaborative Research Group Event Special Lecture by Dr Barbara Gaehtgens The abduction of Ganymede 1635 – an early work by Rembrandt van Rijn – has puzzled many generations of Rembrandt scholars. The painting illustrates the classical Greek myth of the abduction of Ganymede, most beautiful of male mortals, by an eagle-guised Zeus, who desires the beautiful youth as his cup bearer. The theme was not new in art and had been represented by many other artists, including Michelangelo and Peter Paul Rubens. Rembrandt’s representation is unusual, however, in that Ganymede is not a beautiful, ephebic nude but a screaming, urinating toddler, dressed in a linen smock, who is squirming to free himself from the scarf in which the eagle is carrying him. An independent art…

Seminar | Visual Manipulation and Auto/Biography | Sydney Intellectual History Network

Visual Manipulation and Auto/Biography The first seminar for 2014 in Auto/Biography and History series sponsored by the Global Sensibilities Group within the Sydney Intellectual History Network at the University of Sydney. Barbara Gaehtgens | 1643 or How to Represent the Queen’s New Power? Mark De Vitis | Madame as the Marquise: The Politics of Making a Mockery at the Court of Louis XIV This seminar will combine the work of two art historians researching the visual self-representation of royal woman at the French court during the seventeenth century. Dr Gaehtgens (an independent scholar based at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles) explores how Anne of Austria used multiplied images as visual propaganda to change her image from a widowed queen to a self-assured regent. In turn, Dr De Vitis (National Art School) considers the theatrical performances of Elizabeth Charlotte…

Symposium | Art Gallery of NSW – Revolutionary ideas Perspectives on the building of an American nation

Symposium: Revolutionary ideas Perspectives on the building of an American nation This symposium considers the role of the visual arts and other forms of cultural expression in building an idea of nationhood in America from its foundation as a colony through the beginning of the 20th century. It addresses the aims of portraiture, the meanings of landscape, the rise of genre subjects and the significance of garden projects in the contexts of relationships with Britain, claims of independence, pivotal wars and moments of dramatic social change. Presented in conjunction with the Sydney Intellectual History Network at the University of Sydney Date: Saturday 16 November 2013, 10.30am Venue: Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Bookings: $65 non-member/ $50 member/ $30 full-time student/ 02 9225 1878 or via the website. Website: http://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/calendar/revolutionary-ideas/ Program 10.30am Registration and morning tea, Domain Theatre foyer 11am…

Lecture | Hero and Villain: Lafayette’s Legacies by Laura Auricchio

Hero and Villain: Lafayette’s Legacies by Laura Auricchio Laura Auricchio, Associate Professor of Art History and Dean of the School of Undergraduate Studies at The New School in New York. Co-presented by Sydney University and the Sydney Intellectual History Network (SIHN@Sydney) Americans have long hailed the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) as an extraordinarily admirable figure – a wealthy French nobleman who, at the age of 19, volunteered to fight in the War of Independence and prodded his king to support the rebel cause. But in France, Lafayette is seen by partisans on both the left and the right as an opportunist, a misguided dreamer, even a traitor. In her talk, Auricchio will consider how Lafayette, a man who lived by a principle that he called ‘moderation’, could have garnered such disparate reputations. While part of the answer lies in the very…