Tag: University of Melbourne

Call for Papers | Conference: ‘Human Kind: Transforming Identity in British and Australian Portraits, 1700-1914’

Inspired by the outstanding collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, this interdisciplinary conference will be the largest gathering of international and Australian scholars to focus on portraits. It will provide a unique opportunity to explore both British and Australian portraits through a dynamic interchange between academics and curators. September 8-11 2016, University of Melbourne and National Gallery of Victoria Call for papers Papers are invited that focus on British or Australian portraits between 1700 and 1914, which can be interpreted as separate fields or as overlapping or comparative studies. The portraits may be in any public or private collection worldwide, but in particular in the National Gallery of Victoria. They may be in any medium, including painting, print, drawing, sculpture and photography. The conference aims to be both informed and provocative and to provide a robust forum for new…

Lecture | Scorn, Greed, Malevolence & Mischief: Goya’s graphic expression of emotions – Deanna Petherbridge | University of Melbourne

This presentation will examine the consummate skill with which Goya represents emotions in his late private albums and some of the print series associated with these drawings. From 1795-6 Goya borrows the figure of the bruja or witch as an historically subversive topos for portraying his disgust with a corrupt clergy, monarchy and cruel social order. As the proportions of his figures change in the album drawings so his ability to suggest subtlety of facial and bodily emotions in his brush and pen work deepens. Language also becomes more intense for Goya, isolated by his total deafness, and the texts appended to drawings and prints are variably metaphoric, playing with language/visual puns or seeming blocks to clarity of meaning. Like his drawings the titles become sparer but more esoteric, especially in his late self-imposed exile to Bordeux. The relationship between…

Conversation | Collecting thoughts: Suhanya Raffel & Gene Sherman in dialogue | University of Melbourne

Suhanya Raffel, Deputy Director, Art Gallery of New South Wales and curator of Go East: The Gene & Brian Sherman Contemporary Asian Art Collection and Gene Sherman, Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation – share ideas on their stimulating and fruitful collaboration in realising an exhibition from the Sherman collection. This conversation will provide a glimpse into the genesis and shaping of the Sherman collection, as well as identifying the curatorial role in framing artworks for national and international audiences. Suhanya Raffel is Deputy Director and Director of Collections at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. Previously, she was at the Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, where she held many senior curatorial positions since 1994, including deputy director of curatorial and collection development from 2010 and acting director during 2012. She was instrumental in building its contemporary Asia Pacific collection…

Symposium | Art Curatorship Now and Beyond | University of Melbourne

Art Curatorship Now & Beyond: A symposium celebrating 25 years of Art Curatorship at The University of Melbourne Thursday 17–Saturday 19 September 2015 This symposium celebrates 25 years since art curatorship was first offered as a degree at The University of Melbourne. As well as recognising this legacy through reflection and debate, the symposium program provides the opportunity to construct a new roadmap for contemporary curating through dynamic interaction and the exploration of new ideas. Engage with professional colleagues from a range of Australia’s leading art museums and visual arts institutions to examine past, present and future directions in art curatorial research, teaching, and the career development of visual arts professionals. The symposium welcomes academic colleagues, professional peers, art curatorship students and graduates of the course, as well as Arts Faculty alumni and members of the wider public. Participants Keynote lectures by: Dr…

Lecture | Herzschmerz – Love And Pain: Representing the Heart in Early Modern Art | Dagmar Eichberger

This paper investigates the contexts in which the image of a heart-shaped object could be used in order to evoke a range of different meanings. Human love and magic, divine love and faith, the passion of Christ and the sorrows of the Virgin Mary are some of the most prominent associations invoked by the heart in the early modern period and beyond. The heart can also be used in a more allegorical context to signify wrath and envy. Thus the heart is often employed as a symbol for compassion (or lack of compassion), a tradition that continued well into the modern period as Wilhelm Hauff’s novel Cold Heart and other literary texts convey. Dagmar Eichberger is part of an EU-funded research project, Artifex, at the University of Trier and is Professor in the Department of Fine Arts in Heidelberg. With Charles Zika she edited Dürer and his Culture (1998). She is the author of Leben mit Kunst –…

Melbourne Masterclasses: The Life and Legacy of Catherine the Great

The Faculty of Arts at The University of Melbourne proudly presents a four-part masterclass series in partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria’s exhibition Masterpieces from the Hermitage: The Legacy of Catherine the Great. Catherine the Great is the most famous and longest-ruling female monarch of Russia. Her passion for education, the arts and culture heralded the Golden Age of Russia during the Enlightenment era. As a patron of the arts, Catherine amassed a vast art collection over her thirty-four year reign, which ranged from Old Master of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the newest contemporary art of her day. Within a relatively short time Catherine had amassed a collection that rivalled many of the greatest collections in Europe. It was this collection which formed the basis for the State Hermitage Museum, founded in 1764 by Catherine and today…

Lecture | The Artist as Collector: Sir Joshua Reynolds and his Collection of Art | Donato Esposito

Dr Donato Esposito will present a lecture on Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792), the first and most famous President of the Royal Academy of Arts, London, focussing upon his activities as a collector of art. Dr Donato Esposito was a curator in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum, London (1999-2004). He co-curated the exhibition “Sir Joshua Reynolds: the acquisition of genius” at Plymouth City Museum & Art Gallery in 2009. He was recently an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. He is currently working on a monograph on Reynolds as an art collector. Date: Wednesday 29th July, 6:30pm Venue: theatre D, Old Arts Building, University of Melbourne Parkville Website: https://events.unimelb.edu.au/events/5480-the-artist-as-collector-sir-joshua-reynolds-and-his-collection All Welcome. Free to attend.  

Conference | ST Gill and the colonial world conference | State Library of Victoria

In this free conference, curators and art historians discuss the art, life and times of the nineteenth-century Australian artist ST Gill, whose work is showcased in the Australian sketchbook: Colonial life and the art of ST Gill exhibition (17 July to 25 October 2015). The conference will feature papers and discussions presented by Professor Sasha Grishin, art historian and curator of Australian sketchbook; David Hansen, Associate Professor, Centre for Art History and Art Theory, Australian National University; Dr Gerard Vaughan, Director, National Gallery of Australia; Angus Trumble, Director, National Portrait Gallery; Daniel Thomas, art historian and curator; Dr Isobel Crombie, Assistant Director, National Gallery of Victoria; Alisa Bunbury, Curator, National Gallery of Victoria; Associate Professor Alison Inglis, University of Melbourne; Shane Carmody, University of Melbourne; and Professor Andrew J May, University of Melbourne. Keynote lecture | Sheila O’Connell George Cruikshank (1792-1878):…

Lecture | Conrad Rudolph – Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems | University of Melbourne

FACES (Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems) is a project that, after two years of research support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), has established proof of concept for the application of face recognition technology to works of portrait art. In the application of face recognition technology to photographed human faces, a number of difficulties are inherent in a real or perceived alteration of appearance of the face through variations in facial expression, age, angle of pose, and so on. With works of portrait art, not only do all these problems pertain, but these works also have their own additional challenges. Most notably, portrait art does not provide what might be called a photographic likeness but rather one that goes through a process of visual interpretation on the part of the artist. After establishing the initial parameters of…

Melbourne Portrait Group Seminar | Dr Vivien Gaston | Double Identity: William Orpen’s portrait of George C. Beresford (c. 1900)

The Melbourne Portrait Group Seminar is starting up again for 2015. The first paper will be given by Dr Vivien Gaston on ‘Double Identity: William Orpen’s portrait of George C. Beresford (c. 1900) in the National Gallery of Victoria’. Date: Thursday 30 April 2015, 6:45pm. Venue: University of Melbourne, Baillieu Library, Dulcie Hollyock Room. Website: http://melbourneportraitgroup.wordpress.com

News | A New Museum of Contemporary Art for Melbourne University

News that Melbourne University has received a $26 million gift of contemporary art from the property developer and art collector Michael Buxton. The collection will be housed in a new purpose-built museum on the VCA Southbank campus. The museum will operate in conjunction with the University’s Ian Potter Museum of Art. Director, Kelly Gellatly said, “The Collection, which has been established with curatorial rigour, will enable the establishment of an extraordinary museum. It will showcase exhibitions that embrace experimentation and explore some of the major concerns of the 21st Century. Through the activities of the Potter’s Academic Programs unit – unique within Australia – the museum will facilitate object-based learning for undergraduate and graduate students from the University’s diverse faculties and different campuses.” From the university The Buxton Collection is one of the most important private contemporary collections in Australia,…

Ursula Hoff Dinner | University of Melbourne

The Art History discipline at the Faculty of Artsis hosting a dinner to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Dr Ursula Hoff’s arrival in Australia from London in December 1939. Dr Hoff was sponsored by the University Women’s College (now University College), at the University of Melbourne. Dr Hoff went on to have a distinguished career at the University and at the National Gallery of Victoria. This dinner is an opportunity to acknowledge Dr Hoff’s unique contribution to Australian culture. During the dinner, Kelly Gellatly, the Director of the University’s Ian Potter Museum of Art, will speak on Dr Ursula Hoff’s legacy with regards to collection building and the role of collection curators. She will also discuss how the demands of the contemporary museum have shaped collecting activities in recent decades. The Ursula Hoff Art History Scholarship is administered by the…

Seminar | A New Document for Ghiberti at Santa Maria Novella in Florence | Hugh Hudson

A New Document for Ghiberti at Santa Maria Novella in Florence: The Confraternity of St Peter Martyr between Convent and Commune | Dr Hugh Hudson, University of Melbourne An unpublished reference in a book of the Confraternity of St Peter Martyr in the Archivio di Stato di Firenze shows that Lorenzo Ghiberti was among a group of 27 Florentine citizens who met in early 1414, of whom four were elected captains for the year. This raises a number of questions about confraternal practices in early Renaissance Florence. Did one have to be a member of a confraternity to elect, or be elected as, its captain? How much did the organisation of more convent-supported confraternities differ from more lay, or independent, confraternities? Through reference to published confraternal statutes, as well as unpublished archival records, the paper will take this new Ghiberti…

Lecture | Australian Art and Artists in Post-War London | Simon Pierse

In this lecture Simon Pierse sheds new light on the role that Sir Kenneth Clark (later Baron Clark of Saltwood) played in bringing Australian art to a new audience in Britain during the early 1950s. Pierse examines the crucial part that Joseph Burke, inaugural Herald Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Melbourne, had in directing Clark’s attention towards the work of Sidney Nolan and Arthur Boyd and attempts to discover what may have lain beneath Clark’s abiding passion for Australian art and life. Simon Pierse is Senior Lecturer at Aberystwyth University and visiting fellow at the Australian Institute of Art History. His research focuses on British perceptions of Australian art, landscape and identity. His award winning book Australian Art and Artists in London, 1950-1965: an antipodean summer, was published by Ashgate in 2012. Date: Wednesday 08 Oct 2014, 6:30–7:30PM Venue: Old Arts Theatre…

Conference | Contemporary Outsider Art: The Global Context

The University of Melbourne – 23 – 26 October 2014   Forty years after the term ‘Outsider art’ was coined by Roger Cardinal to encompass works by untrained artists who work outside the established art world, new paradigms and definitions are being sought. The current enthusiasm for these forms of expression culminated in Massimiliano Gioni’s 2013 Venice Biennale, which dedicated several exhibits to self-taught or Outsider artists. Reviewing the Biennale in Art and America, Travis Jeppesen wrote ‘the success of Gioni’s bold production signals a move beyond ‘the contemporary’ as the default category we have relied upon for far too long’. Such comments demonstrate the timeliness of this topic and the potential for this conference to contribute to and enrich our understanding of contemporary culture at the broadest level. The increased interest in Outsider art, however, has also raised a…