Tag: University of Melbourne

Duldig Sculpture Lecture | Sculpture and the Museum: From Fortunate Son to Runaway Child – Christopher Marshall | University of Melbourne

Image: Interior view, Gipsoteca canoviano, Possagno (Treviso)

In 2005, the Director of the National Gallery, London, signalled the long-standing eclipse of sculpture in favour of painting when he noted that “sculpture is what you fall over when you step back from the paintings”. The expanded field of contemporary sculptural practice, including installations, conceptual art and commissioned artist interventions, has nonetheless re-energised and revitalised the potential of sculpture to engage with the historical, institutional and even commercial dimensions of the museum. This lecture will consider the long and complex development from the Renaissance to today with a particular focus on the key role played by sculpture in communicating powerful ideas and associations when placed in dynamic museum exhibition environments. Date: 1 September 2016, 6:15-7:15 Venue: Forum Theatre, Level 1, Arts West Building, University of Melbourne Free to attend but registration required online: https://events.unimelb.edu.au/events/7318-sculpture-and-the-museum-from-fortunate-son-to-runaway-child Lecture introduced by Ken Scarlett OAM, Writer…

Masterclasses at Melbourne University | Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese | 17th September 2016 The Faculty of Arts, in association with the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, presents a one day masterclass on American director, producer, screenwriter, and film conservationist, Martin Scorsese in celebration of ACMI’s SCORSESE exhibition. The day will consist of two sessions focussing on Scorsese’s mastery of storytelling through creative process and collaborations. Each session will entail a lecture discussing specific films, followed by Q&A and discussion. A light lunch and course handout notes will be provided. SESSION DETAILS Session 1: Scorsese Sights, Sounds and the Manufacture of Emotion In this lecture Dr Mark Nicholls analyses clips from selected films and demonstrates the way Martin Scorsese tells his stories with actors and through his departments of photography, editing, sound and design. Scorsese’s films make a remarkable visual and aural impression on their audience. Matching…

Symposium | Hidden Traces of Shared History: Rethinking Asia Pacific through 19th and early 20th century photographs | University of Melbourne

Hidden Traces of Shared History: Rethinking Asia Pacific through 19th and early 20th century photographs | Academic Symposium 29 August 2016, 9:30am-4:30pm, Japanese Room, MSD Building Register here for the Symposium and Keynote attendance Keynote Address: Professor Geoffrey Batchen, Victoria University of Wellington 29 August 2016, 5:30-7:00pm, Singapore Theatre, MSD Building Register here for the Keynote Address attendance only This symposium brings together leading researchers who are working on 19th and early 20th century collections of Asia Pacific photographs. Alongside a broader consideration of the significance of the history of photography in the region, explorations of visual and built traces of identity formations, globalised trading and agricultural industrialisation, and the envisioning of modernity and nationalism during the late colonial era will be highlighted. The projects featured in the symposium demonstrate different modes of archival research and interpretation methods and a spectrum…

Masterclass | Greek Mythology – Religion and Art in Ancient Greece | University of Melbourne

Attic black-figure kylix with Dionysiac procession on sides and satyr in tondo c. 500 BCE Ceramic 8.0cm (H) x 25.0cm (W) x 18.5cm (D) The University of Melbourne Art Collection. Gift of David and Marion Adams, 2009. 2009.0233.000.000 © Reproduction enquiries should be forwarded to the Ian Potter Museum of Art

The Faculty of Arts, in partnership with The Ian Potter Museum of Art, present a four-part masterclass on Greek mythology and the significance of religion in daily life through the study of myths and ceramics. Each week case studies on figural vases from The University of Melbourne’s collection will be used to explore the relationship between religion and art in ancient Greece. Imagery, object function and use, and Greek mythology from an archaeological perspective will be examined. Supplementary material, such as coins, a variety of ancient ceramics, and teaching collection sherds will be used to illustrate the broader themes addressed in the program and related participatory activities. Participants will gain analytical skills by placing depictions of Greek mythology into a broader context of civic, cultural, and household significance; evaluate archaeological and art historical criteria relating to Greek mythology, and the significance of…

Talk | Digitalising the Roman Campagna | University of Melbourne

Detail of Giovani Battista Cingolani della Pergola’s 'Topografia Geometrica dell’Agro Romano' of 1704 , British School at Rome.

Collaborative Learning Room 356 Arts West In their presentation Lisa and Katrina will discuss the geo-mapping project, ‘Digitalising the Roman Campagna’, which is being developed in conjunction with the British School at Rome library. The aim ultimately is to create a digital map of the Roman Campagna that could function as a database and repository of information about both the classical and early modern Campagna. The aim is to take two rare, and rarely seen, maps of the Roman Campagna in the early modern period and transform them into new forms of technology and interdisciplinary resources for generations of scholars. The two maps digitalised so far are Giacomo Filippo Ameti’s ‘Il Lazio con le sue conspicue Strade Antiche e Moderne’ (1693), and Giovani Battista Cingolani della Pergola’s ‘Topografia Geometrica dell’Agro Romano’ of 1704 (second edition). One of the primary aims…

Lecture | The Art of Travel in the Name of Science – Sarah Thomas | University of Melbourne

This public lecture explores the significance of mobility to an understanding of visual culture in the colonial period with a particular focus on the works of art produced by British landscape painter William Westall (1781-1850) and Austrian botanical artist Ferdinand Bauer (1760-1826) on board Matthew Flinders’ inaugural circumnavigation of Australia between 1801 and 1803. Considering the status of the travelling artist as eyewitness in the period this paper will also examine the mobility of visual culture itself and the implications for art history in a globalised world. Date: Tuesday 16 August 2016, 6.30pm – 7.30pm Venue: Singapore Theatre, Melbourne School of Design, The University of Melbourne, PARKVILLE  VIC  3010 Admission is free | Bookings are required | Seating is limited To register visit: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/artoftravel

Symposium | Technologies/Histories Symposium | University of Melbourne

Technologies Histories Symposium Image

Co-hosted by the Transformative Technologies Research Unit (University of Melbourne) & Flinders University, this symposium examines developments in various technologies and their relationship to history. The keynote speaker for the event is Lori Emerson, Associate Professor with a split appointment in the Department of English and the Intermedia Arts, Writing, and Performance Program at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She is also Director of the Media Archaeology Lab and writes about media poetics as well as the history of computing, media archaeology, media theory, and digital humanities. Lori Emerson will discuss her current book project titledOther Network – a network archaeology of the history of telecommunications networks that pre-date the Internet or exist outside of the Internet. Session titles include: History, Materiality and Digital (Re)Imaging Being Digital in the 1980s Media Archaeology: the Technological Present and its Histories Date: 9am…

Talk | Studies for masters: new research into old master drawings | University of Melbourne

The spotlight has been shone upon the approximately 100 drawings included in the Baillieu Library Print Collection – many of them gifted by Dr J. Orde Poynton in 1959 – by a series of research projects undertaken by participants in the Cultural Collections Projects Program. A selection of these exquisite drawings will be on display on the ground floor of the Baillieu Library from June 6th until July 24th 2016. A rare opportunity to hear more about how the drawings were made, their attribution and their previous owners will take place with a lunch time presentation by Jessica Cole and Callum Reid. Jessica Cole is a gallery professional and will reveal her findings on a 17th century study of a stone sculpture which adorns the Ponte Sant’ Angelo in Rome. Callum Reid is a doctoral candidate and will speak about…

Short Course with Frank Sear | The Glory that was Greece | University of Melbourne

Short Course: The Glory that was Greece – Greek Art and Architecture This six week course traces the development of Greek art from its beginnings in the Dark Ages to the Classical perfection of the 5th century BC. It also looks at how Greek art changed in the 4th century BC and the radical transformations which occurred as a result of the conquests of Alexander the Great, which extended the Greek world over the whole eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East. Each session includes two 50-minute evening lectures with Q&A and a break with light refreshments. Course handouts and further reading material will be available throughout the duration of the course. Presenter: A world-renowned architectural historian and former Chair of Classics at the University of Melbourne, Emeritus Professor Frank Sear is a graduate of Cambridge University, where he completed both his undergraduate and postgraduate studies. He has…

Eugene Y. Wang lecture at Melbourne Uni|A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond?

A Drop in the Ocean: How Did a Seascape Make Waves in China and Beyond? Professor Eugene Y. Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, Harvard University This lecture is also being presented in Sydney, see this post for more information. This lecture, by renowned scholar of Asian Art, Eugene Wang, will consider the coming together of Western artistic traditions and traditional Chinese culture and legend. As Professor Wang explains in the introduction to his presentation: The daughter of a prehistorical sage-king, so an ancient Chinese tale goes, is accidentally drowned in the Eastern Sea. Her afterlife spirit turns into a vengeful bird with a mission. She picks up—one at a time—a piece of wood or rock from the Western mountains, flies east, and drops it into the Eastern Sea—a drop in the ocean. This way, she would, so…

Lecture | Marco Polo’s Tomatoes, or on Cross-Cultural Exchange in Early European Art | Anne Dunlop, Herald Chair in Fine Arts

Marco Polo with a caravan. Illustration from the 'Catalan Atlas'. Ar. 1375. Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris

Marco Polo’s Tomatoes, or on Cross-Cultural Exchange in Early European Art A lecture by Anne Dunlop, Herald Chair in Fine Arts In the last decades, the question of cross-cultural contact and exchange has emerged as a major field of research in Art History and the humanities in general. This work is driven by the need to understand the early history of our own global moment, but it is also part of a larger and more ambitious project: the attempt to write a global history of art, one that does not privilege Western production at the expense of other cultures. The importance of the project is clear, but there are many competing, and conflicting, ideas about how such a history should be written. To explore the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches, this lecture will focus on a limit-case: the possibility…

Job | Sessional Lecturer needed for Modern Art: The Politics of the New at Melbourne University

The Art History program at The University of Melbourne is seeking a sessional lecturer to teach AHIS10002 Modern Art: The Politics of the New in second semester 2016. The opportunity arises as a result of a staff member being on leave for the semester. The appointee will be expected to have a PhD in a relevant area and will be required to deliver two lectures per week and co-ordinate a group of tutorial staff and take at least one tutorial. Payment will be at the sessional lecturer rates in the University of Melbourne Enterprise Agreement. Please email an expression of interest to Associate Professor Kate MacNeill cmmacn@unimelb.edu.au with a CV that outlines your teaching experience in the areas referred to in the subject description below. Initial inquiries can be directed to Dr Anthony White a.white@unimelb.edu.au Closing date – 6 May…

Lecture | Alpha and Omega, or The Boundary of Our Orient – Alexander Nagel | University of Melbourne

Image: Raphael, School of Athens (detail). Vatican Museum, Vatican City.

In this lecture Professor Nagel will present his recent research on ideas of Asia and America in Renaissance Europe. The decades after 1492 brought Asia closer to Europe than it had ever been. The art, cartography, and literature of the period we call the High Renaissance expanded to imagine a new convergence of worlds where East rejoined West and New neighboured Old. Alexander Nagel is Professor of Fine Arts at the Institute of Fine Arts in New York City. His research is focused on early-modern Italy, but he is also engaged with Modernist and contemporary art. His most recent books include Medieval Modern (2012), The Controversy of Renaissance Art (2011), and, with Christopher Wood, Anachronic Renaissance (2010). He is a contributor to both Cabinet magazine and the London Review of Books, and recent essays and debates have appeared in Artforum,…

Symposium | Myth and Emotion in Early Modern Europe | University of Melbourne

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Greek and Roman classics became increasingly central to the European literary imagination, being referenced, translated, adopted and reshaped by a huge range of authors. In turn, current criticism of early modern literature is ever more concerned with the period’s reception and appropriation of the classical past. Greek and Roman myths held a two­fold appeal for authors: they were ‘known’ stories, culturally iconic and comfortingly familiar to the educated reader, but readerly knowledge could also be manipulated, and the myths reshaped in emotionally provocative and iconoclastic ways. This one day symposium at The University of Melbourne will be an investigation into early modern use of classical myths, asking how myth was used both ‘privately’, to excite emotional effect, and ‘publicly’, to respond to political, religious, or social events. This symposium will focus on how…

Lecture | The Pleasures of Allegory: Rethinking ‘Susanna and the Elders’ – Patricia Simons | University of Melbourne

Image: Tintoretto, Susanna and the Elders. Circa 1555. Vienna, Kunsthistorsiches Museum.

‘Susanna and the Elders’ is commonly read as a case of male voyeurism, in subject and purpose, or as mere moralizing allegory. This lecture moves away from each reductive extreme by re-examining the story’s history and visual effect. Professor Patricia Simons is Professor of Art History, University of Michigan. Her field of study includes the art of Renaissance Europe (primarily Italy, France and the Netherlands) with a special focus on the representation of gender and sexuality Date: Wednesday 9th March, 5:30–6:45PM Venue: Theatre 1, Alan Gilbert Building, University of Melbourne Free to attend. Registrations can be made on the university website.