Tag: The University of Melbourne

Symposium: Print Matters at the Baillieu

Print Matters at the Baillieu Free One Day Symposium inspired by the Baillieu Library Print Collection Saturday 3rd September, 2011 Keynote speaker: Professor Sasha Grishin, Australian National University The Baillieu Library Print Collection includes some 8,000 prints – mostly etchings, engravings, mezzotints, lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings – that date from the fifteenth century to the twentieth. It is based on the gift of some 3,700 Old Master prints donated by Dr J. Orde Poynton in 1959 and which was further enhanced in 1964 with Harold Wright’s gift of half his Lionel Lindsay print collection and prints by his British contemporaries. The collection is principally for teaching and learning; a number of scholars had their first encounter with prints at the Baillieu Library and later emerged in print related institutions and projects such as those offered by the Harold Wright…

Art History Seminar Program at the University of Melbourne

Art History Seminar Programme School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne Program for Semester 2, 2011 Time: Wednesdays, 1 pm- 2 pm Venue: Room 114 John Medley (West Tower) August 3 Monique Webber (University of Melbourne) – Meditantibus Escam: Critical Discourse and the Creation of Innocentine Rome August 17 José Antonio González Zarandona (University of Melbourne) – The destruction of heritage: Rock art in the Burrup Peninsula August 31 Justine Grace (University of Melbourne) – l’avanguardia cattolica: Fillia and the forgotten church of futurism September 14 Professor Jaynie Anderson (University of Melbourne) – CIHA or the International Committee for the History of Art and making world art history October 5 Professor John Clark (University of Sydney) – Ono Tadashige and Japanese avant-garde print movements of the 1930s October 12 Assoc. Professor Jill Carrick (Carleton University) For further information…

Lecture: ‘Feeling Stone’ Jeffrey Jerome Cohen

‘Feeling Stone’ Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (George Washington University) Our vocabulary for stone is impoverished. We describe rock as dumb, mute, unfeeling, unyielding, recalcitrant. Stone can sometimes be invoked as a witness, but most often its testimony is silent, an unfeeling trigger to affect, a passive reminder of tragic human histories. This talk excavates a lithic counter-tradition: stone not simply as a spur to human emotion, but as a lively substance possessed of agency, motility, artistry and possibly even a soul. Surveying work by medieval and contemporary thinkers, from Albertus Magnus and Geoffrey of Monmouth to Gilles Deleuze, Elizabeth Grosz and Roger Caillois, I argue that stone invites us to anonanthropocentric approach of ecologies, landscapes, texts and art. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen is Professor of English and Director of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute (MEMSI) at the George Washington University. He received his BA from…

Lecture: Predicaments of Painting Indigenous Presence in Central Australia: Early Papunya Boards in Circulation, Fred Myers

Predicaments of Painting Indigenous Presence in Central Australia: Early Papunya Boards in Circulation Professor Fred Myers, Silver Professor of Anthropology, New York University This paper considers a predicament in the constitution of Aboriginal acrylic painting in Central Australia. Begun in 1971 as a translation of ritually-based designs into a new medium, the international success of the painting movement attests to their recontextualization from ‘ritual’ to ‘art.’ While much of the iconography in the early acrylic paintings was later considered inappropriate to have circulated – even in the art world – the paintings themselves have continued to be exhibited, and they are considered to be the most authentic forms of presenting authentic indigeneity. At the same time as Western Desert painters have always insisted on the paintings as revealing the indigenous claims to identification with the land, changing styles of painting and…

Symposium: Scoping the future of cultural enrichment through cultural materials conservation

Symposium Scoping the future of cultural enrichment through cultural materials conservation 16th June 2011, Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, The University of Melbourne Background Understanding the conservation of material culture is framed by the values obtained from diverse and broad disciplines. Together the values identify the line of best fit to inform our understanding of a material that is uniquely constructed and aged in an array of climatic conditions. This one-day conservation symposium organised by the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation (CCMC) includes five panels on current materials based research in Australia across the themes of conservation methodologies, data management, climate and materials, imaging and non-destructive analysis and materials analysis. Research draws on a number of research grants awarded by the Australian Research Council including The Twentieth Century in Paint, and strong institutional engagement across Australia, Southeast Asia, the UK…

Public Forum: Aspects of Gustave Moreau

Aspects of Gustave Moreau A Free Public Forum Four expert speakers will address different aspects of Gustave Moreau’s art and work. This free public forum is held in conjunction with a major exhibition of his works, Gustave Moreau and the Eternal Feminine, at the NGV International. Speakers Dr Ted Gott, National Gallery of Victoria Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, University of Melbourne Lucy Ellem, La Trobe University Angela Hesson, The Johnston Collection Introduced and convened by Associate Professor Alison Inglis. Date:  Friday, 8 April 2011 1:30 – 3:30 pm Venue: Elisabeth Murdoch Lecture Theatre, The University of Melbourne, Parkville. This event is free. All Welcome. Enquiries: contact Alison Inglis asi@unimelb.edu.au Abstracts and Speaker Bios Angela Hesson ‘Dominance, Dissonance, and Decoration: Gustave Moreau and the feminine fetish’ This paper will explore Moreau’s artistic interventions into questions of femininity and feminisation, and the influence of these…

Funding: ARC Postdoctoral Fellowships, Centre for History of Emotions

ARC Postdoctoral Fellowships, Centre for History of Emotions The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Faculty of Arts, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies The successful candidate will contribute to a project in the ‘Change’ program of the Centre, under the leadership of Professor Charles Zika, exploring the emotions created in response to sacred space in late medieval and early modern Europe. Particular attention will be paid to the rituals, performances and objects which turned these sites into places of direct collective and personal emotional experience, and also elicited indirect emotion on a local, regional or national level through extended memory. Applicants will require a PhD in medieval or early modern literary or historical studies or in Australian history or literature, with relevant published research, and demonstrated facility with relevant languages. Salary: $69,010 – $74,076 p.a. plus 17% superannuation. Closing date: April 18th, 2011…

EVCS: Carl Villis ‘Giambattista Tiepolo, Francesco Algarotti and The Finding of Moses’

The European Visual Culture Seminar presents: Carl Villis, Conservator of Paintings before 1800, National Gallery of Victoria Giambattista Tiepolo, Francesco Algarotti and The Finding of Moses in the National Gallery of Victoria Between 1958 and 2008, the NGV’s large eighteenth-century Venetian canvas The Finding of Moses carried an attribution to Sebastiano Ricci. In 2009 this was changed to Giambattista Tiepolo after an extended technical examination and a major conservation treatment. This talk will trace the long history of the ‘new’ Tiepolo attribution, and will introduce the theory that the work is another product of the fruitful collaboration between Tiepolo and his friend and patron, Count Francesco Algarotti. Date: Monday 28 March 2011 6:30 pm Venue: Room 150 Elisabeth Murdoch Building, University of Melbourne, Parkville All Welcome Drinks and nibbles provided (gold coin donation appreciated). The seminar will be followed by…

Lecture: Angus Trumble ‘Benjamin West and ‘The Venetian Secret’: Art and fraud in late Eighteenth-century London’

Benjamin West and ‘The Venetian Secret’: Art and fraud in late Eighteenth-century London Angus Trumble, Curator of Painting and Sculpture, Yale Center for British Art In this lecture, Angus Trumble will discuss the late eighteenth-century hoax that fooled several prominent British artists and sheds light on a number of intriguing technical and historical issues. In 1796 Benjamin West, the American-born President of the Royal Academy of Arts in London, fell victim to a remarkable fraud. A shadowy figure, Thomas Provis, and his artist daughter, Ann Jemima Provis, persuaded West that they possessed a copy of an old manuscript purporting to contain descriptions of materials and techniques used by the Venetian painters of the High Renaissance, including Titian, to achieve the famously luminous effects of colour that had long been thought lost, forgotten, or shrouded in secrecy. West experimented with these materials and…

Symposium: Digital Light – Technique, Technology, Creation

Digital Light: Technique, Technology, Creation Free symposium, 18–19 March 2011, Melbourne This interdisciplinary symposium invites leading international and Australian figures working with digital light-based technologies to consider the capacities and limitations of contemporary digital processes. How do contemporary digital media imitate, advance or retreat from the achievements of older techniques and devices? Why do accidental artefacts of specific media become desirable outcomes in others? What role do artists and artisans play in redefining technologies through technique? Artists, curators and technologists will explore these questions from diverse angles, each exploring the techniques and technologies used in depicting, recording and projecting digital light. Confirmed speakers: Geoffrey Batchen (Art Historian, NZ) Victor Burgin (Artist, UK) Steve Dietz (Curator, US) Jon Ippolito (Artist/Curator, US) Stephen Jones (Artist/Historian, AUST) Alex Monteith (Artist, NZ) Christiane Paul (Curator, US) Jeffrey Shaw (Artist, HK) Alvy Ray Smith (Computer…

Research in Progress in Early Modern Art History at Melbourne University

Research in progress in Early Modern Art History Date: 18th November 2010 Venue: Elisabeth Murdoch Theatre Research papers in honour of Professor John Paoletti, following the Margaret Manion lecture on 17th November ‘Clothing Michelangelo’s David: History, Iconography, Context’ (6:30pm) – Full lecture details here. Program 11-11.30 Dale Kent, School of Historical Studies, University of Melbourne ‘La cara e buona imagine paterna di voi’: ideal images of patriarchs and patrons as models for the right ordering of Renaissance Florence’ Paternal, filial and civic duties were closely related in Renaissance Florence, and their imperatives derived ultimately from the example of the Divine Father and his decrees. This paper explores a key theme of the first chapter of my forthcoming book, “Fathers and Friends: Patronage and Patriarchy in Renaissance Florence.” It will focus on the major fifteenth century Florentine representations of the chief…

Cultural Treasures Day at the University of Melbourne

Cultural Treasures Day 2010 The University of Melbourne There are many exciting museums and collections at the University of Melbourne. Join us in this very special event where you will discover exhibitions, talks, demonstrations, displays, tours, and a musical performance. A whole day of entertainment, fascination and fun for grown-ups and families, all for free and just minutes from the city centre. Sunday 14 November 2010, 10am–4pm Email bookings: treasures-days@unimelb.edu.au Tel (03) 8344 3964 Collections Open (all open 10am – 4pm unless otherwise stated) Classics and Archaeology Gallery: Ancient coins: heads and tales of antique lands Ian Potter Museum of Art, Swanston St, open until 5pm East Asian Collection: Rare and historical materials 3rd flr, Baillieu Library, Professors’ Walk Ernst Matthaei Memorial Collection of Early Glass University House, Professors’ Walk Grainger Museum Royal Parade Harry Brookes Allen Museum of Anatomy…

Reopening: Grainger Museum at Melbourne University

Grainger Museum Re-opens Sunday 17 October The long-anticipated reopening of the Grainger Museum to the public will take place on Sunday 17 October at 1:00. Visitors can once again tour the rich and extensive collection that documents the life and times and interests of the remarkable Percy Grainger. The museum’s curators have put together a compelling new suite of exhibits that promise to fascinate and intrigue. The Grainger Museum reopens following a period of major works to preserve the historic building and upgrade its facilities for visitors, staff and the collection. Percy Aldridge Grainger (1882-1961) was an internationally renowned Australian-American composer and pianist. His extraordinarily full life also included pioneering work as a folk music collector and arranger, educator, social and musical commentator, clothing designer, painter and Free Music inventor. He was a skilled linguist and became known, in addition…

Talk and Launch: ‘The Three Ages of Terence’

The Three Ages of Terence Andrew Turner and Bernard Muir are launching the new Terence Digital Facsimile Edition (link below), called ‘The 3 Ages of Terence’. The talk will focus on the transformations of Terence’s plays from the Late Antique period through the Middle Ages and into the early stages of the print tradition. The features of the new DVD will also be demonstrated. This is the third lecture in an ongoing series focusing on the workings of the monastic scriptorium in the Middle Ages. Date: Monday 22 November at 6 pm Venue: University House, The University of Melbourne (Parkville) There will be drinks and snacks from 5.30 (free to members; $10 for other guests) and the talk will be followed by an optional dinner at the House. Please confirm your interest in attending by calling the House on 8344…

Lecture: Ann Galbally ‘Shackled and Set Free: Art, Music and Theatre in Melbourne in the 1890s’

Ann Galbally Shackled and Set Free: Art, Music and Theatre in Melbourne in the 1890s A free public lecture in conjunction with a symposium  on G. W. L. Marshall-Hall. Composer, conductor, critic and littérateur, Marshall-Hall was Melbourne’s leading musician for more than twenty years until his death in 1915. His bohemian lifestyle and outspoken views sparked intense and sometimes vitriolic public debate, and his career was marred by misfortune and errors of judgement. Dr Ann Galbally, Professorial Fellow in Art History at the University of Melbourne and author of Charles Conder: The Last Bohemian (2002) as well as books on Arthur Streeton, John Peter Russell and Frederick McCubbin, will speak about art and bohemianism in turn-of-the-century Melbourne. Date: 7.30 pm, Thursday 11 November 2010 Venue: Buzzard Theatre, Trinity College, University of Melbourne Enquiries: marshall-hall@unimelb.edu.au OR www.vcam.unimelb.edu.au/marshallhall Download the pdf for…