Tag: The University of Melbourne

Symposium on Italian Renaissance Art at The University of Melbourne

Symposium on Italian Renaissance Art at The University of Melbourne A symposium is to be held on 9th and 10th of March 2012 on recent research on Italian Paintings in the exhibition Renaissance currently at the National Gallery of Australia, from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo on to be held in the Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building at the University of Melbourne. Morning Session Chaired by Dr Christopher Marshall, The University of Melbourne 10.00 – 10.20am  Professor Jaynie Anderson, The University of Melbourne ‘Why and what did Giovanni Morelli collect in Renaissance Art?‘ One of the major collectors, whose works are in Canberra for the Renaissance exhibition, is the politician, writer and connoisseur Giovanni Morelli (1816-1891).  Morelli is celebrated for the fact that he invented connoisseurship for the modern world and for the fact that Sigmund Freud claimed to have invented psychological…

Public Lecture | Between Heaven and Earth: paintings from the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo on show at the National Gallery Australia

Between Heaven and Earth: paintings from the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo on show at the National Gallery Australia Dr Claire Renkin Art historian Dr Claire Renkin lectures in spirituality of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, at Yarra Theological Union. In this lecture she examines certain themes of Renaissance paintings with special reference to the exhibition showing at the National Gallery of Australia. Date: Monday 20 February 2012, 5–6pm Venue: The Oratory, Newman College, University of Melbourne, 887 Swanston Street, Parkville Bookings: Email agehrig@newman.unimelb.edu.au Online http://www.trybooking.com/20360 Phone 9342 1614 Lecture Presented by The University of Melbourne and the Allan and Maria Myers Academic Centre – Newman College and St Mary’s College.  

JOB: Lecturer in Art (Critical and Theoretical Studies)

Lecturer in Art (Critical and Theoretical Studies) School of Art – Faculty of the VCA and MCM Salary: Level A $57,351 – $77,825 p.a. or Level B $81,925 – $97,283 p.a. plus 17% superannuation. Level of appointment is subject to qualifications and experience. The position of Lecturer in Critical and Theoretical Studies will entail participation in the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching program and contribution to the institution’s research and culture through honours and postgraduate supervision, mentoring and through the appointee’s own research initiatives and publications. Close date: 5 February 2012 For Position Description, Selection Criteria and application details see the Melbourne University website.

Conference – Dispersed Identities: Sexuality, Surrealism and the Global Avant-Gardes

Dispersed Identities: Sexuality, Surrealism and the Global Avant-Gardes February 3-4, 2012, The University of Melbourne The Centre for the Study of Surrealism and its Legacies, The School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne, and the Australian Institute of Art History present Dispersed Identities: Sexuality, Surrealism and the Global Avant-Gardes is a conference which brings together questions of sexuality and gender with a broader discussion of the geographies of modern and contemporary culture. Speakers will focus on the legacy of surrealism and cognate avant-garde movements in the visual arts. A guiding principle of the conference is that one cannot speak about the global reach of modern and contemporary visual culture without bringing in questions of sexuality. Topics dealt with include the connections between geographic, sexual and artistic outsiderness; processes of dislocation and displacement and their relationship to the surrealist tradition…

Public Lecture by Lyndal Roper and Symposium: Emotions and Historical Change in Pre-Modern Europe

Luther and the Emotional Dynamics of the Reformation A public lecture by Professor Lyndal Roper, University of Oxford The Reformation was a theological and intellectual movement, but it was also profoundly emotional. Luther’s unbearable fear and despair as a monk was what impelled him to understand God’s justice differently. Anger was central to Luther’s creativity – time and again, he reached new intellectual insights through attacking father figures. Envy, too, played its part, and in his letters Luther constantly attributes envy to others. And when clerical celibacy was abolished and priests began to marry, a host of complex sexual emotions were unleashed. This lecture explores how we can understand the Reformation differently by exploring its emotional dynamics. Lyndal Roper is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Oxford and editor of the premier historical journal, Past and Present. She has recently…

Seminar: Beatrix Ahrens – Rediscovered: Nineteenth Century German Painting in Victoria’s Public Collections

Rediscovered: Nineteenth Century German Painting in Victoria’s Public Collections  Dr Beatrix Ahrens, University of Freiburg, Germany It seems like nowhere else outside Europe German paintings of the second half of the 19th century have been as popular as in Victoria. From the 1870s to the 1890s a surprisingly large number of German paintings were imported to Australia, yet many of these works of art have never been adequately researched. They often lie undiscovered in storage, some paintings are even threatened by decay. This lecture, for the first time, gives an overview of German 19th century paintings in Victorian public collections. The term ‘German paintings’ refers to paintings by German-speaking artists and also includes paintings by artists who migrated to Australia. The starting point of my lecture is the historical environment that influenced the collection of German paintings in Australia. Important aspects are the emigration of German artists from the middle of the 19th…

Lecture: Living Building Challenge – Jason McLennan, Melbourne School of Design

Melbourne School of Design Lecture Living Building Challenge – Jason McLennan What is the Living Building Challenge? The Living Building Challenge is a philosophy, advocacy tool, and certification program that addresses development on all scales and defines the most advanced measure of sustainability in the built environment possible today. The Challenge acts to diminish the gap between current limits and ideal solutions and is comprised of seven performance areas, or ‘Petals’: Site, Water, Energy, Health, Materials, Equity and Beauty. Petals are subdivided into a total of twenty Imperatives, each of which focuses on a specific sphere of influence. Living Building Challenge certification is based on actual, rather than modeled, or anticipated, performance. Therefore, projects must be operational for at least twelve consecutive months prior to evaluation. By identifying an ideal and positioning that ideal as an indicator of success, the Challenge…

Symposium in Honour of Ernst Kitzinger: Sites of Devotion | New Directions in Medieval Art History

Public Symposium in Honour of Ernst Kitzinger (1912-2003) Sites of Devotion | New Directions in Medieval Art History This symposium celebrates the centenary of the birth of Ernst Kitzinger (b. Munich 1912 – d. New York 2003), distinguished historian of Late Antique, Medieval and Byzantine art. It provides an opportunity to acknowledge the ongoing influence of his work in Australia, where he was interned as an enemy alien during World War II. Addressing the interests of both specialists and the wider public, papers will explore the ways in which Kitzinger’s interests in the study of art related to Christian devotion have influenced the teaching and research of four Melbourne-based scholars working across a range of fields including art history, archaeology and curatorship. Speakers from the University of Melbourne and the National Gallery of Victoria will share recent directions their work has taken in…

Exhibition: Treasures – Antiquities from Melbourne private collections

Treasures: Antiquities from Melbourne Private Collections Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, 22nd October 2011 – 15th April 2012 Treasures: Antiquities from Melbourne Private Collections opens at the Ian Potter Museum of Art on October 22nd. the exhibition will feature objects from ancient Greece, Rome and the Near East – some over 5000 years old, and many presented for public display for the first time. The exhibition’s curator Dr Andrew Jamieson says that ‘Melbourne is fortunate to have a number of important private collections of antiquities. These intricately crafted works from various collections reveal fascinating insights into ancient societies.Treasures is a wonderful display of some of selected works from around the world. This exhibition allows us to explore the history and culture of each piece as though we were collectors ourselves.’ Venue: Ian Potter Museum of Art, Swanston St,…

Funding: Ursula Hoff Scholarship in Art History for University of Melbourne students

Ursula Hoff Scholarship in Art History for University of Melbourne Students The Scholarship has been named in honour of the late Dr Ursula Hoff AO OBE PhD (Hamburg) Hon DLitt (Monash) Hon LLD (Melb) Hon DLitt (La Trobe) who died on 10 January 2005. Dr Ursula Hoff was born in 1909 in London and her career encompassed art history, curatorship and museum management at the University and the National Gallery of Victoria (‘NGV’). Dr Hoff was a lecturer in the then-Department of Fine Arts within the Faculty of Arts at the University. She also worked at the NGV, being its assistant director from 1968 to 1973. She was the London advisor to the Felton Bequest from 1975 to 1983. Dr Hoff was a foundation fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 1970 and a member of the Council…

Shane Carmody ‘To be a Pilgrim’ Margaret Manion Lecture 2011

Margaret Manion Lecture 2011 To be a Pilgrim Shane Carmody In this lecture Shane Carmody will explore the provenance and relevance of a medieval manuscript held in the collection of the State Library of Victoria: The pilgrimage of the lyfe of the manhode and The pilgrimage of the sowle. This manuscript dates from 1430 and is an English prose translation of the famous work written by the French Cistercian Guillaume de Deguileville a century earlier. The translation had a major impact on the English imagination through the upheaval of the Reformation and later religious conflicts, and its metaphors still resonate today. This crudely made and graphically illustrated book was conserved and restored for the State Library of Victoria’s exhibition The Medieval Imagination: Illuminated Manuscripts from Cambridge, Australia and New Zealand. An exhibition curated by Margaret Manion and seen by over 1000 000 people in 2008.…

Mis-Design Artist’s Forum

Mis-Design Artist’s Forum Guest curator Dr Grace McQuilten will be joined by local artists Flatland OK, Pacific Women’s Weaving Circle and Slow Art Collective for a discussion about their projects, their collaborations and their ideas. These artists are interested in challenging the “design” of contemporary art and the possibility of critique in contemporary consumer culture. They all employ artistic strategies which maintain a tension between art and contemporary architecture, fashion and interior design, focusing their production on issues of sustainability, human agency and social impact. Date: Saturday, 24 September | 2.00pm Venue: Multifunction room, Level 1, The Ian Potter Museum of Art, Swanston Street, The University of Melbourne Register via this link before Thursday, 22September or contact Amanda Morris at the Potter at potter-events@unimelb.edu.au or 03 8344 0327. Mis-Design is currently showing at the Potter at The University of Melbourne, Parkville until 6th November 2011 http://www.art-museum.unimelb.edu.au/art_exhibitions_detail.aspx?view=179

EVCS: Callum Reid ‘Annibale Carracci’s Holy Family at the National Gallery of Victoria’

Callum Reid ‘Annibale Carracci’s Holy Family at the National Gallery of Victoria’ This paper examines the little- studied Holy Family by Annibale Carracci (1560-1609), which hangs in the National Gallery of Victoria, and discusses its style, iconography and position within the artist’s oeuvre. The subject of the ‘Holy Family’ was repeated several times during the artist’s transition from a Bolognese to a Roman style, and it provides a means of studying this development closely through a comparison between each painting: the constancy of theme and figures serves to highlight the critical changes in style. This paper presents the Melbourne Holy Family within the context of these smaller devotional works, considering both the social and personal transitions that they represent. It also brings to light new documents concerning the painting’s provenance and artistic reception. Date: Monday 5th September, 2011, 6:30pm. Venue: Rm 150, Elisabeth Murdoch Building, the University of Melbourne, Parkville. All Welcome. Drinks and nibbles provided (gold coin…

The Reluctant Master: A symposium to honour the life and work of Romaldo Giurgola

The Reluctant Master A symposium to honour the life and work of Romaldo Giurgola Through his professional practice, writings and teaching, Romaldo Giurgola (1920 – ) has been a formidable participant in the international architectural discourse for over 60 years. This symposium provides an opportunity to reflect upon the many facets of this long career and its impact on the discipline. This is a free public symposium. Please register on the Melbourne School of Design website here. Date: Saturday August 20th, 2011 9:00am – 6:15pm Venue: The Oratory, Newman College, 887 Swanston Street, The University of Melbourne, Parkville Symposium Programme 09:00 Professor Paolo Tombesi, University of Melbourne ‘Introduction: (Rom)Aldo’ ROME 09:20 Chair: Dr Flavia Marcello, Deakin University 09:30 Professor Stephen Frith, University of Canberra –  ‘Aldo and Rome: The early years’ 10:00 Dr Riccardo Vannucci, FAREstudio Architects, Rome – ‘Aldo…

Sugden Fellow Lecture: Associate Professor Jill Carrick – The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France

Sugden Fellow Lecture The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France Associate Professor Jill Carrick From the realistic laden tables of 17th Century Dutch still-lives to contemporary works of art that feature found objects and trash, artists have sought to depict vividly the material objects we use in everyday life. This lecture examines the found-object sculptures of two 1960s artists working in France—Daniel Spoerri and Arman—and explores the intriguing dialogue between past and present enacted in their works. Themes addressed in this lecture include memory and amnesia, postwar modernization, and consumerism. Jill Carrick is Associate Professor in Art History at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. She writes on French post-war art, and her publications include the first book in English on the 1960s group Nouveau Réalisme or ‘New Realism’. She is visiting Melbourne as the Sugden Fellow at Queen’s College…