Tag: Sculpture

CFP: The New British Sculpture – Reviewing the persistence of an idea, c.1850-present

The New British Sculpture: Reviewing the persistence of an idea, c.1850-present Henry Moore Institute 18 February 2011 Deadline: 30 June 2010. British sculpture has been frequently singled out as an area of outstanding cultural expertise. Numerous major exhibitions and accompanying catalogues, including British Sculpture in the Twentieth Century (1981), Un Siècle de Sculpture Anglaise (1996) and Sculpture in 20th-Century Britain (2003) have subscribed to the idea of a distinct ‘strand’, ‘school’ or ‘family’ of artistic endeavour. This idea has been presented as having been rejuvenated by a cycle of Oedipal renewal in which successive groups of younger artists have been seen to overthrow the practices of the previous generation. Among British sculpture’s recent enfants terribles are the ‘Young British Artists’ of the 1990s, the ‘New Sculptors’ of the 1980s and the ‘New Generation’ sculptors of the 1960s who ousted such…

Terry Lane on Vanishing Sculptures: Australian Open Garden Scheme

Australia’s Open Garden Scheme Terry Lane on ‘The Vanishing Sculptures’ NGV International, Melbourne Wednesday 21 April 2010 Melbourne’s nineteenth-century fathers enriched the city’s gardens and art gallery with copies of classical and neoclassical sculptures. Just what were these statues and why were they removed from public view? Foremost authority on Australian art of the era, respected author and former senior curator at the National Gallery of Victoria, the inimitable, charming and entertaining Terence Lane will give an illustrated lecture which will reveal some at times surprising answers. Following the lecture, the Gallery’s sculpture garden is well worth a visit to view significant examples of modern public sculpture. Australia’s Open Garden Scheme is very grateful to the National Gallery of Victoria for its support of this event. Tickets $24 including morning tea. Wed 21 April 2010, 10.30am. Numbers are strictly limited…

'Wonder-Lust': The Reception of the Belvedere Sculpture Courtyard

The European Visual Culture Seminar presents: Caterina Sciacca ‘Wonder-Lust’: The Reception of the Belvedere Sculpture Courtyard The Belvedere Sculpture Courtyard houses one of the most famous sculpture collections in the Western world. It has attracted the interests of scholars, artists and tourists since the Renaissance. It originally functioned as a private pleasure garden to which only a privileged few were granted access. In the eighteenth century this changed, and the courtyard became popular with a new audience: the Grand Tourists. For the Grand Tourist, the experience offered by the collection in the Belvedere Sculpture Courtyard was both educational (in that it provided access to some of the masterpieces of antiquity) and aesthetic (in that it encouraged viewers to take pleasure in the representation of the human body). This paper will discuss the sensual nature of the Belvedere Statue Courtyard during…

CFP for Conferences on Sculpture, Pre Raphaelites & William Morris and Trecento Art

The practical problems of sculpture CFP Renaissance Society of America 2011 Paper abstracts that address topics regarding practical problems of sculpture and its European or even global exchange in the Early Modern period–such as transport, materials acquisition, customs and other expenses and other related issues, problems of reception in different cultural contexts from its original production site, or issues in cross-cultural sculpture collecting or commissions–should be sent to kelley.didio@uvm.edu by 15 May 2010. Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Art History Department of Art and Art History University of Vermont ——- “Useful & Beautiful: The Transatlantic Arts of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites” University of Delaware, Winterthur Museum and Country Estate, Delaware Art Museum, 7-9 October 2010 Deadline for submissions is 15 March 2010 “Useful and Beautiful: The Transatlantic Arts of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites” will be…