Tag: Renaissance Art

Symposium on Italian Renaissance Art at The University of Melbourne

Symposium on Italian Renaissance Art at The University of Melbourne A symposium is to be held on 9th and 10th of March 2012 on recent research on Italian Paintings in the exhibition Renaissance currently at the National Gallery of Australia, from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo on to be held in the Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building at the University of Melbourne. Morning Session Chaired by Dr Christopher Marshall, The University of Melbourne 10.00 – 10.20am  Professor Jaynie Anderson, The University of Melbourne ‘Why and what did Giovanni Morelli collect in Renaissance Art?‘ One of the major collectors, whose works are in Canberra for the Renaissance exhibition, is the politician, writer and connoisseur Giovanni Morelli (1816-1891).  Morelli is celebrated for the fact that he invented connoisseurship for the modern world and for the fact that Sigmund Freud claimed to have invented psychological…

Review | Raffaello incontra Raffaello, Palazzo Barberini, Rome – Monique-Louise Webber

Exhibition Review Raffaello incontra Raffaello. Il Ritratto di giovane del Museo Thyssen Bornemisza e la Fornarina Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica, Palazzo Barberini, Rome, 3 November 2011 – 29 January 2012 Reviewed by Monique-Louise Webber Aptly described as a ‘piccola mostra’ or ‘little exhibition’ in the wall text, Raffaello Incontra Raffaello, at the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica in the Palazzo Barberini, Rome (closed 29 January) invites reflection upon the nature of Raphael’s portraiture, and our response to it, through the comparison of two works. These are Portrait of a Young Man (c.1515) (Fig. 1), which has been attributed jointly to Raphael and an unknown assistant, and La Fornarina (1520) (Fig. 2). The juxtaposition of these works—the former owned by the Museo Thyssen Bornemisza, Madrid and the latter by the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica—was made possible by the temporary exchange of Tintoretto’s…

Public Lecture | Between Heaven and Earth: paintings from the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo on show at the National Gallery Australia

Between Heaven and Earth: paintings from the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo on show at the National Gallery Australia Dr Claire Renkin Art historian Dr Claire Renkin lectures in spirituality of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, at Yarra Theological Union. In this lecture she examines certain themes of Renaissance paintings with special reference to the exhibition showing at the National Gallery of Australia. Date: Monday 20 February 2012, 5–6pm Venue: The Oratory, Newman College, University of Melbourne, 887 Swanston Street, Parkville Bookings: Email agehrig@newman.unimelb.edu.au Online http://www.trybooking.com/20360 Phone 9342 1614 Lecture Presented by The University of Melbourne and the Allan and Maria Myers Academic Centre – Newman College and St Mary’s College.  

Call for Papers: Women Artists in Early Modern Italy (Florence, 3 Mar 12)

Call For Papers Women Artists in Early Modern Italy Florence, Italy, March 3, 2012 Deadline: Jan 12, 2011 The Jane Fortune Research Program on Women Artists in the Age of the Medici at The Medici Archive Project is organizing a one-day conference (Florence, March 3, 2012) to highlight new documentary findings on the creative production of women in the visual arts (broadly defined) in the period 1500-1750. Researchers have been exploiting historical archives to answer such questions as, What were the lives of women artists like in early modern Italy? Did their creative production take its cues from the social, cultural and professional circumstances that characterized their careers? Did they operate workshops similarly to male artists? Did their techniques for attracting patronage and setting prices follow the example of male artists? Where else besides the professional artist’s studio did women…

Job: One-year position in Renaissance Art (University of Pittsburgh, US)

Position in Renaissance Art (University of Pittsburgh) Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 29, 2011-April 30, 2012 Application deadline: Jul 22, 2011 The department of History of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh is currently seeking a one-year replacement at the rank of visiting assistant professor, in the field of European or global Renaissance, for the academic year 2011-12 (with a start date of August 29, 2011 and an end date of April 29, 2012). The teaching load is two courses per term, with an additional expectation of some interaction with graduate students working on premodern European topics. PhD and teaching experience are required. We are particularly interested in attracting emerging scholars with innovative approaches to their field, and with an interest in connecting their area of specialty to larger intellectual frameworks that cut across field and disciplines. The dept has…

Exhibition Review: Lorenzo Lotto, Rome Scuderie del Quirinale, until 12 June. David R. Marshall

Exhibition Review Lorenzo Lotto Rome Scuderie del Quirinale, until 12 June Reviewed by David R. Marshall The last big Lotto show was in 1998, but I suspect this one doesn’t quite match it. The illustrations to the introductory essays in the catalogue indicate the ones that got away. But even so, this is an impressive exhibition, mainly for the altarpieces. For those who do not know the Scuderie, it is the old papal stables on Piazza del Quirinale. It has two long and wide floors that once housed horses. It is one of the best Roman venues, as these spaces are roomy and flexible, although the transition between levels can be awkward. In this case the lower floor is devoted to large altarpieces. These are mounted above altar-table like structures on a plinth, which sets them at a good height…

Call for Papers: Impressions of Colour: Rediscovering Colour in Early Modern Printmaking, ca 1400-1700

Call for Papers Impressions of Colour: Rediscovering Colour in Early Modern Printmaking, ca 1400-1700 Cambridge, 8-9 December 2011 The absence of colour has been long been considered a defining characteristic of early modern printmaking. Colour printing from the hundreds of years between the invention of the printing press and 1700, when Christophe Le Blon developed the three-colour method we use today, has been thought of as rare and extraordinary. However, new research has revealed that bright inks added commercial value, didactic meaning and visual emphasis to subjects as diverse as anatomy, art, astronomy, biology, cartography, medicine, militaria and polemics in both single-sheet prints and books. Despite the significance and scale of these discoveries, the bias against colour continues to dominate print scholarship; the colour in colour prints is often ignored. As the technology to disseminate images in their original colour…

EVCS: Robert W. Gaston ‘Exploring a Postmodernist Bronzino’

This lecture was first delivered on December 10, 2010 at the British Institute, Florence, as the keynote address for the conference Agnolo Bronzino – Medici Court Artist in Context, a convegno that, in the words of its proposer, Prof. Andrea Gáldy, “sought to place the major exhibition of Bronzino’s work organised by the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi into a broader artistic, historical, and economic context. Unlike a catalogue, the conference sessions will be organised thematically rather than focused exclusively on specific works by the artist, and will encourage specialists in other fields (such as tapestries or theatre) to bring new perspectives to bear on the artist and his world. We thus propose to anchor Bronzino in time, space, and the stylistic development of sixteenth century Italian art, without losing sight of trends in social and political history or patronage in Florence…

Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America 2012, Washington

Call for Papers The Fifty-eighth Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America Washington, D.C. 22-24 March 2012 The Program Committee invites submissions for individual papers or panels on any aspect of Renaissance Studies, or the era ca. 1300-1650. You need not be a member of RSA to submit a proposal, but if your paper is accepted you must become a member and register for the conference. Proposals are evaluated by the Program Committee for their scholarly contribution to an aspect of the field. Each proposed paper must include: contact information for author; title; abstract (150 word maximum); keywords; and a one-page curriculum vitae. Proposals may be submitted by individual scholars, by RSA Discipline Representatives, or by Representatives of Associate Organizations. Only individuals may submit single papers, and they may submit one proposal; Disciplines and Associate Organizations submit complete sessions only. Any…

Lecture: Dale Kent ‘Images of Friendship from Renaissance Florence from Dante to Michelangelo’

Joseph Burke Lecture, 2011 Images of Friendship from Renaissance Florence from Dante to Michelangelo Professor Dale Kent The question of whether true friendship could exist in an era when patronage shaped most social relations occupied Renaissance Florentines as it had the ancient Greeks and Romans whose culture they admired and emulated. Rather than attempting to measure Renaissance friendship against a universal ideal defined by essentially modern notions of disinterestedness, intimacy and sincerity, I will explore the meaning of love and friendship as they were represented in Renaissance images, drawn from a repertoire of Christian and classical themes, and embracing the relationship between heavenly and human friendship. Dale Kent has returned to live in Melbourne after a distinguished academic career in the United States of America where she held positions as Professor of History, University of California, Riverside and then Professor Emerita…

Call for Papers – Figure and Ornament: Aesthetics, Art and Architecture in the Caucasus region, from 400 to 1650

Call for Papers Figure and Ornament: Aesthetics, Art and Architecture in the Caucasus region, from 400 to 1650 Conference, George Chubinashvili National Research Centre, Tbilisi, the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz-Max-Planck-Institut, and the University of Basel Tbilisi, 29 September – 1 October 2011 Deadline for Applications: 31st January 2011 Figure and ornament have generally been considered as opposites. Figurative representations, however, can be ornamented or framed by ornaments, and ornaments are frequently formed by repeated figural motives, such as animals or plants. In fact, ornaments and figures are related in manifold ways and define or articulate pictorial or architectonic spaces, elaborating various aesthetic concepts. The cultures the conference will discuss are not to be seen as given or static units but as having been formed and transformed in relation and interaction with each other. Thus, on the one hand, the conference…

Call for Papers: Vasari Quincentenary: A Re-evaluation of his Work

Call for Papers Vasari quincentenary: a re-evaluation of his work Deadline: June 1, 2011 2011 sees the fifth centenary of Vasari’s birth. To mark the event, the Journal of Art Historiography calls for articles, documents and reviews to celebrate the event. While there has been an enormous secondary literature on Vasari, much of it has been driven by a desire to use his work to find facts about his artists. Little has been written on the overall structure of his Lives, his purposes in publication, the orality of his society and the way in which the distinctiveness of his education affected his writing. He seems to have been treated as an ‘Artist’ who simply cobbled together a set of lives relying on the literary intelligence of others, with their mountains of classical  sources. There has been no Anglophone translation of the 1550 edition of his Lives nor any complete modern…

Lecture: John Paoletti ‘Learn My Language: Strategies of Medici Patronage in Renaissance Florence’

The Bill Kent Foundation invites you to the Inaugural Bill Kent Memorial Lecture Professor John T. Paoletti Learn My Language: Strategies of Medici Patronage in Renaissance Florence Emeritus Professor John T. Paoletti is currently a Macgeorge Fellow at The University of Melbourne. He was Professor of Art History and the William R Kenan Professor of the Humanities at Wesleyan University. Co-author of Art in Renaissance Italy, a standard text on the subject (now in its third edition), he has also published widely on issues of patronage and on Michelangelo, and is currently completing a book on Michelangelo’s David. He co-edited a benchmark collection of essays – Renaissance Florence: A Social History (Cambridge University Press, 2006/2008) – which Bill Kent reviewed as ‘excellent’, full of ‘novel and stimulating information and insights’. For many years Professor Paoletti was editor of the prestigious…

Lecture: Dr Elisabeth Taburet-Delahaye on ‘France 1500: Between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance’

Dr Elisabeth Taburet-Delahaye Director of the Cluny Museum, Paris ‘France 1500: Between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance’ Dr Taburet-Delahaye, visiting Hancock Fellow at the Australian Tapestry Workshop, is the principal curator of the exhibition France 1500 which opened at the Grand Palais in  Paris on 6 October 2010. This exhibition explores a time of unprecedented artistic contact and creative effervescence in France, and takes a close look at various aspects of the art of the time. The exhibition encompasses painting, sculpture, stained glass, tapestry, gold work and the art of the book. It will travel to the Art Institute of Chicago in February 2011. This lecture is the second of a three-part series to be presented in Melbourne by Dr Taburet-Delahaye, sponsored by the Australian Tapestry Workshop, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Academic Centre.  Please see each…

Lecture: John Paoletti ‘Clothing Michelangelo’s David: History, Iconography, Context’

John Paoletti Macgeorge Fellow at The University of Melbourne Clothing Michelangelo’s David: History, Iconography, Context The Margaret Manion Lecture 2010, November 17th 6:30 Michelangelo’s David has become so much an image of Renaissance genius in art and civic awareness, so much a cultural icon, and so frequently tied to modern sexual politics that it has become impossible to see clearly. Can we figuratively clothe the statue with new meanings if we look not only at the history of art or the politics of the time, but also the lived activities of ordinary contemporary Florentines, those people who have no history, but to whom the statue was addressed? John Paoletti is a  Macgeorge Fellow at The University of Melbourne,  Australian Institute of Art History. He is the Kenan Professor of the Humanities, Emeritus and Professor of Art History, Emeritus at Wesleyan…