Tag: Parkville

The Reluctant Master: A symposium to honour the life and work of Romaldo Giurgola

The Reluctant Master A symposium to honour the life and work of Romaldo Giurgola Through his professional practice, writings and teaching, Romaldo Giurgola (1920 – ) has been a formidable participant in the international architectural discourse for over 60 years. This symposium provides an opportunity to reflect upon the many facets of this long career and its impact on the discipline. This is a free public symposium. Please register on the Melbourne School of Design website here. Date: Saturday August 20th, 2011 9:00am – 6:15pm Venue: The Oratory, Newman College, 887 Swanston Street, The University of Melbourne, Parkville Symposium Programme 09:00 Professor Paolo Tombesi, University of Melbourne ‘Introduction: (Rom)Aldo’ ROME 09:20 Chair: Dr Flavia Marcello, Deakin University 09:30 Professor Stephen Frith, University of Canberra –  ‘Aldo and Rome: The early years’ 10:00 Dr Riccardo Vannucci, FAREstudio Architects, Rome – ‘Aldo…

Sugden Fellow Lecture: Associate Professor Jill Carrick – The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France

Sugden Fellow Lecture The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France Associate Professor Jill Carrick From the realistic laden tables of 17th Century Dutch still-lives to contemporary works of art that feature found objects and trash, artists have sought to depict vividly the material objects we use in everyday life. This lecture examines the found-object sculptures of two 1960s artists working in France—Daniel Spoerri and Arman—and explores the intriguing dialogue between past and present enacted in their works. Themes addressed in this lecture include memory and amnesia, postwar modernization, and consumerism. Jill Carrick is Associate Professor in Art History at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. She writes on French post-war art, and her publications include the first book in English on the 1960s group Nouveau Réalisme or ‘New Realism’. She is visiting Melbourne as the Sugden Fellow at Queen’s College…

Symposium: Print Matters at the Baillieu

Print Matters at the Baillieu Free One Day Symposium inspired by the Baillieu Library Print Collection Saturday 3rd September, 2011 Keynote speaker: Professor Sasha Grishin, Australian National University The Baillieu Library Print Collection includes some 8,000 prints – mostly etchings, engravings, mezzotints, lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings – that date from the fifteenth century to the twentieth. It is based on the gift of some 3,700 Old Master prints donated by Dr J. Orde Poynton in 1959 and which was further enhanced in 1964 with Harold Wright’s gift of half his Lionel Lindsay print collection and prints by his British contemporaries. The collection is principally for teaching and learning; a number of scholars had their first encounter with prints at the Baillieu Library and later emerged in print related institutions and projects such as those offered by the Harold Wright…

Art History Seminar Program at the University of Melbourne

Art History Seminar Programme School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne Program for Semester 2, 2011 Time: Wednesdays, 1 pm- 2 pm Venue: Room 114 John Medley (West Tower) August 3 Monique Webber (University of Melbourne) – Meditantibus Escam: Critical Discourse and the Creation of Innocentine Rome August 17 José Antonio González Zarandona (University of Melbourne) – The destruction of heritage: Rock art in the Burrup Peninsula August 31 Justine Grace (University of Melbourne) – l’avanguardia cattolica: Fillia and the forgotten church of futurism September 14 Professor Jaynie Anderson (University of Melbourne) – CIHA or the International Committee for the History of Art and making world art history October 5 Professor John Clark (University of Sydney) – Ono Tadashige and Japanese avant-garde print movements of the 1930s October 12 Assoc. Professor Jill Carrick (Carleton University) For further information…

Lecture: Kent Larson ‘Changing Places: Responsive housing, mobility systems, and networked intelligence for future cities’

Special Public Lecture Changing Places: Responsive housing, mobility systems, and networked intelligence for future cities Professor Kent Larson To meet the profound sustainability, demographic, and health challenges of the future, new strategies must be found for creating responsive places where people live and work, and the mobility systems that connect them. Professor Kent Larson will present the work of his MIT Media Lab research group to explore the intersection of high-performance housing with urban mobility-on-demand systems, including persuasive electric bike-lane vehicles to encourage exercise, the transformable live-work “CityHome” that functions as if it were much larger, and autonomous parking/charging technology. He will also review the group’s “Living Lab” experiments to better understand and respond to human activity in natural environments including sensing, algorithms, and interfaces for proactive health and energy conservation. Professor Larson brings his insights as an architect, researcher…

Lecture: Dale Kent ‘Images of Friendship from Renaissance Florence from Dante to Michelangelo’

Joseph Burke Lecture, 2011 Images of Friendship from Renaissance Florence from Dante to Michelangelo Professor Dale Kent The question of whether true friendship could exist in an era when patronage shaped most social relations occupied Renaissance Florentines as it had the ancient Greeks and Romans whose culture they admired and emulated. Rather than attempting to measure Renaissance friendship against a universal ideal defined by essentially modern notions of disinterestedness, intimacy and sincerity, I will explore the meaning of love and friendship as they were represented in Renaissance images, drawn from a repertoire of Christian and classical themes, and embracing the relationship between heavenly and human friendship. Dale Kent has returned to live in Melbourne after a distinguished academic career in the United States of America where she held positions as Professor of History, University of California, Riverside and then Professor Emerita…

Lecture: The Great Temple at Thanjavur – One Thousand Years, 1010 to 2010 Old Problems, New Thoughts

The Great Temple at Thanjavur: One Thousand Years, 1010 to 2010. Old Problems, New Thoughts. Special Public Lecture by alumnus and Professorial Associate Dr. George Michell at the Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning. The millennial anniversary of the great temple at Thanjavur has been the occasion for the publication of a splendid Marg volume co-authored by George Michell and Indira Viswanathan Peterson, and illustrated by photographs by Bharath Ramarutham. One of the aims of this work was to re-examine the historical context of the foundation of the temple under Rajaraja I, and its original programme of stone sculptures and bronzes, as well as its murals, which are now accessible via a splendid new set of digital images commissioned by the Archaeological Survey of India office in Chennai. While the temple is familiar to art historians, a number of difficulties in…

Public Forum: Aspects of Gustave Moreau

Aspects of Gustave Moreau A Free Public Forum Four expert speakers will address different aspects of Gustave Moreau’s art and work. This free public forum is held in conjunction with a major exhibition of his works, Gustave Moreau and the Eternal Feminine, at the NGV International. Speakers Dr Ted Gott, National Gallery of Victoria Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, University of Melbourne Lucy Ellem, La Trobe University Angela Hesson, The Johnston Collection Introduced and convened by Associate Professor Alison Inglis. Date:  Friday, 8 April 2011 1:30 – 3:30 pm Venue: Elisabeth Murdoch Lecture Theatre, The University of Melbourne, Parkville. This event is free. All Welcome. Enquiries: contact Alison Inglis asi@unimelb.edu.au Abstracts and Speaker Bios Angela Hesson ‘Dominance, Dissonance, and Decoration: Gustave Moreau and the feminine fetish’ This paper will explore Moreau’s artistic interventions into questions of femininity and feminisation, and the influence of these…

Lecture – Ronald Ridley ‘Team Tutankhamun’

Marion Adams Memorial Lecture Team Tutankhamun Professor Emeritus Ronald Ridley, Melbourne University Everyone knows the story of the discovery of the famous boy pharaoh’s tomb in 1922. A much more difficult matter for the historian of archaeology  is understanding the many people who made the discovery and then  revealed and preserved the tomb’s contents. This lecture will focus on Lord Carnarvon, Howard Carter and Harry Burton, while celebrating also the other members of the team. Date: 6:30pm, Tuesday 19th April 2011 Venue: Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building, The University of Melbourne, Parkville campus Public Lecture – All Welcome. Enquiries: Contact Margaret Sullivan at masu@unimelb.edu.au or (03) 8344 7775 website

Lecture: Conservation Challenges of Contemporary Art – Jane Norman

Melbourne University, Faculty of Arts Public Lecture: Conservation Challenges of Contemporary Art Ms Jane Norman Museums develop standards for protecting works of art under their care and this process, while constantly evolving, is tested most vigorously with the acquisition, installation and collections care of contemporary art. The ephemeral nature of many works, the involvement of living artists, and the questions raised when preserving the integrity of conceptual artwork with replacement components: these are some of the issues facing conservators working to protect and conserve contemporary art. The talk will highlight several examples from American collections where collaboration, compromise and tradition-based conservation training helped find solutions to new challenges in the field of conservation. Biography: Jane Norman is an objects conservator, currently in private practice in Washington, D.C. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and a Master of Arts degree in Ethnographic and Archeological Conservation, both from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. She worked for many years at the Smithsonian Institution, first in the Anthropology Conservation Laboratory at the National Museum…

EVCS: Carl Villis ‘Giambattista Tiepolo, Francesco Algarotti and The Finding of Moses’

The European Visual Culture Seminar presents: Carl Villis, Conservator of Paintings before 1800, National Gallery of Victoria Giambattista Tiepolo, Francesco Algarotti and The Finding of Moses in the National Gallery of Victoria Between 1958 and 2008, the NGV’s large eighteenth-century Venetian canvas The Finding of Moses carried an attribution to Sebastiano Ricci. In 2009 this was changed to Giambattista Tiepolo after an extended technical examination and a major conservation treatment. This talk will trace the long history of the ‘new’ Tiepolo attribution, and will introduce the theory that the work is another product of the fruitful collaboration between Tiepolo and his friend and patron, Count Francesco Algarotti. Date: Monday 28 March 2011 6:30 pm Venue: Room 150 Elisabeth Murdoch Building, University of Melbourne, Parkville All Welcome Drinks and nibbles provided (gold coin donation appreciated). The seminar will be followed by…

Lecture – Paul Jett ‘Scientific Research on Ancient Chinese Gold and Silver’

Scientific Research on Ancient Chinese Gold and Silver Paul Jett, Head, Department of Conservation and Scientific Research, Freer Gallery of Art/Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C Scientific analysis combined with archaeological discoveries in China have greatly expanded the body of knowledge about gold and silver in early China.  This presentation will discuss three particular studies of gold and silver artifacts from China, focusing on silver from the Tang and Liao dynasties (7th to 12th centuries AD), and gold dating to the 5th to 3rd centuries BC. Biography – As the Head of Conservation and Scientific Research at the Freer Gallery/ Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Art at the Smithsonian Institution, Paul Jett is an internationally renowned scholar and practitioner in the field of conservation of Asian sculpture and metal artifacts. He has built important collaborations with Asia Institutes, has published regularly with a focus on technical studies of metalwork and sculpture and organized the biennial Forbes Symposium at the Freer Gallery of Art since 2001. Paul Jett is…

Lecture: Angus Trumble ‘Benjamin West and ‘The Venetian Secret’: Art and fraud in late Eighteenth-century London’

Benjamin West and ‘The Venetian Secret’: Art and fraud in late Eighteenth-century London Angus Trumble, Curator of Painting and Sculpture, Yale Center for British Art In this lecture, Angus Trumble will discuss the late eighteenth-century hoax that fooled several prominent British artists and sheds light on a number of intriguing technical and historical issues. In 1796 Benjamin West, the American-born President of the Royal Academy of Arts in London, fell victim to a remarkable fraud. A shadowy figure, Thomas Provis, and his artist daughter, Ann Jemima Provis, persuaded West that they possessed a copy of an old manuscript purporting to contain descriptions of materials and techniques used by the Venetian painters of the High Renaissance, including Titian, to achieve the famously luminous effects of colour that had long been thought lost, forgotten, or shrouded in secrecy. West experimented with these materials and…

Symposium: Digital Light – Technique, Technology, Creation

Digital Light: Technique, Technology, Creation Free symposium, 18–19 March 2011, Melbourne This interdisciplinary symposium invites leading international and Australian figures working with digital light-based technologies to consider the capacities and limitations of contemporary digital processes. How do contemporary digital media imitate, advance or retreat from the achievements of older techniques and devices? Why do accidental artefacts of specific media become desirable outcomes in others? What role do artists and artisans play in redefining technologies through technique? Artists, curators and technologists will explore these questions from diverse angles, each exploring the techniques and technologies used in depicting, recording and projecting digital light. Confirmed speakers: Geoffrey Batchen (Art Historian, NZ) Victor Burgin (Artist, UK) Steve Dietz (Curator, US) Jon Ippolito (Artist/Curator, US) Stephen Jones (Artist/Historian, AUST) Alex Monteith (Artist, NZ) Christiane Paul (Curator, US) Jeffrey Shaw (Artist, HK) Alvy Ray Smith (Computer…

Lecture – Nigel Morgan ‘Bible stories in a medieval English Psalter: educating Margaret de Lacy, Lady of Meath’

Professor Nigel Morgan, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge Bible stories in a medieval English Psalter: educating Margaret de Lacy, Lady of Meath Nigel Morgan, Honorary Professor at Corpus Christi College Cambridge, is one of the world’s leading historians of medieval art. His lecture focuses on a richly illustrated English Psalter (called today the Munich Golden Psalter) which will be published in facsimile later in 2011. Professor Morgan has written the commentary for this facsimile. He will discuss the educational impact of the Psalter’s illustrations, in the light of its probable owner, Margaret de Lacy, Lady of Meath. Date: 6.00 – 7.00pm, Thursday 27 January 2011 Venue: The Oratory, Newman College, University of Melbourne, 887 Swanston Street, Parkville (Melways Map 2B E5) All Welcome. Free Entry. Bookings essential Email: agehrig@academiccentre.stmarys.newman.unimelb.edu.au or phone 03 9342 1614 Seminar on digitisation of Medieval Manuscripts Professor Morgan is also giving a seminar at The State Library of Victoria on the digitisation…