Tag: Online Resource

Online Resource | Jewish Museum of Australia launches digitised collection

Always excitied to share collection digitistion news, and the Jewish Museum of Australia (based in Melbourne) has recently launched a new website that includes online access to around 3000 objects from their collection, with plans for mroe to be added. We couldn’t be more excited to launch our digital collection, along with a very smart looking new website. Senior Curator and Collection Manager Juliette Hanson (pictured) says: The Internet Museum (IMu) is a very exciting and important project for the Jewish Museum. It will increase the level of access to our collection immeasurably by opening it up to international audiences, as well as allowing local researchers and visitors to engage with the collection before and after their visit to the Museum. Our remarkable collection contains over 20,000 objects and stories. For the past year the collections team have been busily working to make…

Online Resource | Fifty artworks from the Monash University Collection

Monash University Museum of Art has published a new writing project Fifty artworks from the Monash University Collection. This online publication presents a suite of specially commissioned texts by art historians, curators and artists. From Helen Hughes, Research Curator MUMA’s new writing project, Fifty artworks from the Monash University Collection, presents a suite of specially commissioned texts by art historians, curators and artists. In inviting these responses, our desire was to open the Collection up to a broad range of voices and perspectives – from those who have had close contact with it over five decades, to those new to it. The fifty selected artworks include some of the most well-known and seen of the Collection, as well as others that deserve greater attention. Without being too prescriptive, the selection reflects the material, conceptual, cultural and temporal diversity and scope of…

Online Resource | Morgan Library and Museum launch new website and improved access to digitised collection

The Morgan Library and Museum has launched a new website which offers vastly improved access to its digitised collections. The images of the collection are high quality and can be zoomed in to see fine detail. In many cases the backs of objects have also been photographed. Some objects, such as the ancient seals, have been photographed in three dimensions and can be rotated. As well as an important collection of Rembrandt drawings the Morgan also hold a large number of illuminated manuscripts, music manuscripts and rare books. Some aspects of the search are a bit basic (it is easy to do a keyword search, but more general browsing is challenging), as are the rather stark records, but the press release indicates that this is part of an ongoing process so these will no doubt be updated at some point.…

Online Resource | Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery Digitised Collection

Thomas William Roberts, Ulverstone Beach, 1931, oil on canvas on composition board. Purchased with funds from the Launceston Museum and Art Gallery Foundation, 2008 (detail).

The Queen Victoria Art Gallery in Launceston has announced that they have digitised 684 paintings and made them available online. The collection strengths are described on their website as Tasmanian Colonial Art (this collection documents the artistic heritage of Tasmania through paintings, works on paper and sculpture), Modern and Contemporary Australian Art (this collection documents the history of Australia’s postcolonial art of aesthetic value through paintings, works on paper, sculpture and multi-media, and, International Art (a small but significant collection of international paintings and works on paper). The online collection is mainly focused on Australian art, with a small number of European paintings. It is great to see regional museums being supported to digitise collections that are often less well-known compared to our national and state galleries, and this will no doubt be a useful tool for a variety of researchers. On a quick…

Online Resource | The Artist’s Handbook from Taylor & Francis

Taylor & Francis/Routledge have put together a range of popular and important articles on art history and art theory published in the various journals that they publish. This collection has been called ‘The Artist’s Handbook’ (why not the  The Art Historian’s Handbook?) and is divided into four sections on Genres, Eras, Icons (actually ‘Artists’ really) and How-to (Materials and Techniques probably a better name). These categories (and the descriptions of them) are all rather basic*, but the positive aspect of this initiative is that all articles included in the collections have apparently been made open access to read online or to download. From a quick scan the collection seems to include several hundred articles from important journals, making this a useful collection for anyone who doesn’t have ready access to online journal databases. You can browse the collection here.   *…

Online Resource | University of Melbourne Cultural Collections

The University of Melbourne has launched a new website dedicated to providing information about the objects in the university’s various collections, and information/suggestions on how these might be used in teaching across a variety of disciplines. The website is (unsurprisingly) primarily aimed at people teaching and studying at the University of Melbourne, but all information is readily available to anyone and the high-quality reproductions, potted histories of the objects, and links to further reading are likely to be of interest to a broader audience. You can browse the objects included here http://library.unimelb.edu.au/teachingobjects#home From the website: Teaching with unique collections provides resources, an online showcase, and a virtual setting for teaching and learning in many disciplines. It features objects, books, manuscripts, works of art and other items from the university’s Prints, Rare Books and Rare Music collections, Grainger Museum,  University of Melbourne Archives and Ian Potter Museum…

Online Resource | MoMA exhibition archive

The Museum of Modern Art has begun making their exhibition history archives available online. The collection – which ranges from 1929 until the present – includes exhibition catalogues, primary documents, installation views, and an index of participating artists. The images are not public domain so you will still need to seek permission to publish them, but the online, searchable archive is still an important resource for researchers. Read more here: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/15/arts/design/moma-will-make-thousands-of-exhibition-images-available-online.html?_r=0 You can search online here. From the MoMA website The Museum of Modern Art opened in November 1929 with its first exhibition, Cézanne, Gauguin, Seurat, Van Gogh. Since that time the Museum has presented more than 3,500 exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, architecture and design, photography, film, performance, and new media. The exhibition history can be searched freely, or browsed in a more structured way by exhibition type or time period. Each…

Online Resource | Stuarts Online

An online resource dedicated to the history of Stuart Britain funded by the (UK) Arts and Humanities Research Council, and developed by the universities of Exeter and Oxford in partnership with the Ash­molean Museum, the Bodleian Library, the Historical Association, and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Some of it seems aimed at teachers with lesson plans and similar, but there are also useful list of online resources, transcribed historical texts, timelines and short biographies of the major players. From the website: Stuarts Online is a rich resource, bringing cutting-edge scholarship on the Stuart era to a wider audience. By focusing on key moments, documents and artefacts, Stuarts Online brings this pivotal period of British political and cultural history to life, for teachers, students and the wider public. The website contains twenty films – each centred on a key text or artefact – which…

Online Resource Review | Raphael Research Resource

The Raphael Research Resource is an online resource produced by the National Gallery in London with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The resource is described as ‘bringing together art-historical, technical and conservation-based information and creating a platform which could eventually host Raphael’s complete œuvre in unprecedented depth.’ Websites like this are surely the way forward in terms of presenting the oeuvre of an artist, not necessarily to entirely replace catalogue raisonné (but perhaps they will in some cases), but to draw together a network of digitised images, archival research, technical research and so on from different institutions, which is beyond the scope of a traditional printed works. It is also great to see cultural institutions making available not only high quality digitised images, but the range of other information they hold that is often only available internally, or…

New Journal on Art History Pedagogy and Practice (AHPP)

A new journal on teaching and pedagogy in art history. Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), in partnership with the Office of Library Services at the City University of New York (CUNY), is excited to announce the launch of Art History Pedagogy and Practice (AHPP) on Academic Works’ Digital Commons platform. Published by AHTR, a practitioner-led, open-educational resource for educators who address art history, visual culture, and material culture, AHPP is the first academic journal dedicated to the scholarship of teaching and learning in art history (SoTL-AH). The result of a two-year initiative, AHPP responds to a long-standing need to advance, collect, disseminate, and demonstrate pedagogical research specific to the discipline. The call for papers for the inaugural issue, forthcoming in fall 2016, is available on the AHTR website. You can also read the recent AHTR white paper the Need for a…