Tag: Museums

News | Denton Corker Marshall wins new SAM architecture competition

Yesterday the Greater Shepparton City Council announced that Denton Corker Marshall has won the architetural competition to build the new Shepparton Art Museum. From SAM The architectural competition for a new SAM (Shepparton Art Museum) and building jury recommendation was endorsed at the Ordinary Council Meeting on Tuesday 18 April following a comprehensive design competition spanning several months. The seven member expert jury report noted that the Denton Corker Marshall proposal was unanimously selected as the winning proposal for the Stage 2 Concept Design Competition after a robust and rigorous assessment of the five design concepts against the agreed criteria. The Denton Corker Marshall proposal stood out because it combined a powerful and relevant conceptual idea – well-resolved and compelling in its sculptural expression and detail – with a highly adaptable, functional, safe and efficient solution, according to the report. The…

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Letter from North America | The Reopening of the Yale Center for British Art – Felicity Harley-McGowan

After a sixteen-month closure, the Yale Center for British Art reopened to the Yale University community on the afternoon of Monday May 9. The excitement was palpable. People of all ages from all quarters of the university wove their way from bottom to top to bottom of the building – students, staff, faculty, donors, all transfixed and enthused by the space, and what they discovered in that space. It was a kind of viewer utopia I had not experienced before: strangers smiled and spoke to each other, people audibly admired and made remarks to each other as they marvelled at the return to life of a much loved building and its collection. Since opening to the public on May 11, the response to the renovation of the building and rehang of the collection has been resoundingly positive. The interior space…

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News | NGV attendance figures rank alongside major international museums

Image of visitro figures from the Art Newspaper

The annual Art Newspaper report on attendance figures always makes for interesting reading. There are the unsurprising results (the Louvre remains the most visited museum in the world with 8.6 million over the year), alongside the news that the NGV nabbed three positions in the list of the most popular Contemporary Art Exhibitions of 2015, with the David Shrigley exhibition in top place, followed by Carlo Amorales and Ryan Trecartin, and its Medieval Moderns (based on the NGV’s permanent collection) garnering over 350k visitors. All three were free exhibitions. As Michaela Boland in The Australian has already pointed out these figures are based on the numbers of visitors to the gallery while the exhibition was on, not on actual visitors to each exhibition. Since the NGV has just announced that the very popular Warhol/Weiwei exhibition has hit 300 000 visitors after…

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Symposium | Art and the Connected Future | NGV International

‘The blog is the modern drawing… It gives the most information: it shows my complete surroundings’ – Ai Weiwei ‘I want to be a machine’ – Andy Warhol Our worldview is increasingly mediated by digital technology. How do leading innovators think it might also impact on our creativity? Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei innovators of their age, push boundaries between culture and technology – Warhol through film, television and publishing, and Ai through social media networks that use art to engage with global social and political issues. Inspired by the artistic practices of Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei, share in the discussion of how we make and experience art alongside rapid changes in technology. What might the future of art look like? Speakers include: Ben Davis, National Art Critic, artnet News, New York City; Tom Uglow, Creative Director, Google Creative Lab, Sydney; Simon Crerar, Founding Editor, BuzzFeed, Australia; Max Delany, Artistic…

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Recent News and Writing on Art History | 22nd January 2016

A round-up of recent stories from the world of art, museums and art history. A story from Tim Walsh in Apollo that asks whether Australia’s ‘coup culture’ in politics is hurting the arts. “In the space of five years, Australia has seen five prime ministers attempt to take the reins of an increasingly erratic and jittery federal parliament. In tandem, Australia’s art world keenly felt each twist and turn; moments of optimism were eclipsed by fear and doubt with the election of the right wing conservative government led by Tony Abbott in September 2013.” A report on Enfilade that the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library has catalogued, re-catalogued, and made available online 60,000 objects in their collection. While the Yale Center for British Art has just released more than 22,000 additional high-resolution images through its online collection (available here). To date, the Center has made…

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Review | Masterpieces from the Hermitage: The Legacy of Catherine the Great at the NGV | Katrina Grant

binary options minimum deposit 20 Masterpieces from the Hermitage: The Legacy of Catherine the Great at the National Gallery of Victoria International until the 8th November 2015. We enter the exhibition face-to-face with Catherine the Great in a portrait by Swedish artist Alexander Roslin. The Empress was not altogether impressed by the portrait, declaring that Roslin had made her look like ‘a Swedish cook, coarse and simple.’ Despite Catherine’s reservations, the portrait (which shows the Empress in ‘Slavonic’ dress, fastened with a diamond buckle and pointing toward a bust of Peter the Great) proved to be a successful representation and was copied numerous times. The painting is flanked by two busts of the philosophes Voltaire and Diderot by the little-known French sculptor Marie-Anne Collot. On some level, both men had an almost personal friendship with Catherine. In one letter, Voltaire complimented her as an ‘enlightened despot’…

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News and Writing on Art and Art History | June 9th 2015

binära optioner swiss A round-up of some of the news and stories on art and art history from the past week. The Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney has cancelled their Marina Abramovic retrospective that was planned for 2016. In a comment made to Fairfax Media Abramovic  said ‘They say that it is complicated. One reason was there were two exhibitions in Australia. It was too much to make a third one. The trustees they didn’t want any more.’ Her work is the focus of two upcoming exhibitions, one in Sydney at Kaldor Art projects, and another at MONA. Is one reason (or even the main reason?) for the cancellation a symptom of our museums wanting exclusives? A great article by Griselda Pollock in The Conversation UK that addresses the recent ‘Inventing Impressionism’ exhibition at the National Gallery (in London) and the ‘disappearing…

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Conversation | MoMA Director Glenn D. Lowry in conversation with Edmund Capon | MPavilion

هوايات تصنع المال In 1932, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) established the world’s first curatorial department devoted to architecture and design. Director Glenn D. Lowry pioneered and presided over the museum’s 2004 renovation, designed by the Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi, and is currently overseeing the ambitious expansion and redevelopment that is set for completion in 2018. Lowry comes to MPavilion to discuss design’s role in the museum, joined in conversation by Edmund Capon, Chair of the Australian Institute of Architects Foundation and former director of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Date: Thursday 30 October at 6pm Venue: MPavilion, Queen Victoria Gardens (opposite NGV International) Bookings essential – Book your free spot here.

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Lecture | The Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge: a case study in the evolution of the art museum – Duncan Robinson

http://zipcapitalgroup.com/?tici=best-forex-chart-indicators&897=59 best forex chart indicators The Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge: a case study in the evolution of the art museum Dean’s Lecture | Duncan Robinson The Fitzwilliam Museum was founded in 1816 by the bequest made to the University of Cambridge by a wealthy alumnus, Richard Viscount Fitzwilliam. In this lecture, Duncan Robinson traces its development, reflected in its architecture, from the private collection of an 18th Century aristocrat to its position today as one of Britain’s foremost art museums in which full, public access is combined with objects-based research, conservation facilities and teaching at all levels in order to fulfil its founder’s commitment to ‘the increase of learning.’ Duncan Robinson, CBE, FSA, was, until his retirement in 2012, the Master of Magdalene College Cambridge, and a Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. He is a graduate of both Cambridge and Yale Universities and a former…

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Lecture | Professor Thomas W. Gaehtgens, Director, The Getty Research Institute | Sydney University

corso di trading in opzioni Professor Thomas W. Gaehtgens, Director, The Getty Research Institute The Power Institute and Sydney Ideas are proud to present a lecture by internationally respected art scholar and historian, and Director of the Getty Research Institute, Professor Thomas W. Gaehtgens. In his presentation, Professor Gaehtgens will share insights from his seven years at the helm of the Getty Research Institute, one of the world’s most preeminent research centers for arts and culture. In particular, Professor Gaehtgens will discuss the work of the Getty Research Institute with regard to its global commitment to research and scholarly resources. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear Professor Gaehtgens speak, and to learn how a leading institution such as the Getty successfully dedicates itself to advancing further knowledge and understanding within the field of visual arts. The Getty Research Institute is an operating program of…

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Lecture | Tony Ellwood ‘The NGV and the 21st Century Art Museum Experience’

Sildenafil Citrate ab juli billiger The La Trobe University Art History Alumni, with the National Gallery of Victoria, presents the sixteenth annual Rae Alexander Lecture, which is to be delivered by La Trobe distinguished alumnus Tony Ellwood. The lecture will encompass a range of subjects looking at the approaches of the 21st century art museum. The lecture will include a discussion of the NGV’s major summer exhibition, Melbourne Now; an exhibition that will include up to 200 artists and a team of over 30 curators, resulting in the largest exhibition in the NGV’s history. Tony Ellwood is the Director of the National Gallery of Victoria and was previously Director of the Queensland Art Gallery and the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA). He has served on numerous State and Commonwealth boards for the Arts, and was on the selection committees for the 2003 and 2007 Venice…

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Art and Art History News | September 13th 2013

www opzionibinarieonline it A round up of recent news from the world of art Katrina Grant A press release from the Australian Academy of the Humanities has cautioned that ‘the Coalition’s proposal to redirect Australian Research Council funds away from projects it deems to be “wasteful” compromises the fundamental principle of funding research based on the criteria of excellence.’ Made last week, pre-election, but, still relevant. A good post-election follow up in the Guardian Australia by Hila Shacher from UWA who writes that “Politicians shouldn’t be allowed to decide what is “relevant” in research any more than they have the right to tell business owners whether they like or dislike their products.” And that “if the waste lies anywhere, it is in the over-bureaucratic and counter-productive sections in ARC grant applications in “which researchers bend over backwards to mollify politicians concerned that somebody, somewhere, might be doing…

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Review | Alain de Botton, Religion for Atheists by David R. Marshall

köpa Viagra seriöst Thoughts on Alain de Botton, Religion for Atheists David R. Marshall Alain de Botton’s new book is of interest because it directly addresses an issue important for atheistic art historians: if religion is bad, why was the art it produced so good? The usual answer is either (a) that religion is irrelevant to what really matters in such art—it embodies the individuals that created it, rather than the institutions that sponsored it— or (b) it is all a matter of history and so the question is beside the point. The first answer makes particular sense to those whose personal experience is that good things come about in spite of institutions, not because of them. De Botton takes the opposite tack: that it is a given that intellectual bases of religions are nonsense—myths left over from times of ignorance—but we should…

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Artworks on ABC Radio National presents MONA Free Forum at the Wheeler Centre

opzione binaria robot zkusenosti MONA free forum at the Wheeler Centre An adult Disneyland, a bold experiment in the way contemporary art is displayed, a temple to sex and death or one man’s obsessive folly? David Walsh’s Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) outside  Hobart has attracted almost 200,000 visitors since it opened in January with the local art world’s most lavish party. So what’s it all about and can the interest be sustained? Presenter of ABC Radio National’s Artworks program, Amanda Smith, will join philosopher John Armstrong,  Juliana Engberg (director of the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art) and artist Peter Hill in a debate about MONA. Venue: Wheeler Centre  176 Little Lonsdale Street, Melbourne, on Date: Thursday July 14 at 6pm. Entry is free. The event will launch the new MONA issue of Island, Tasmania’s literary magazine. For more information and to…

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Conference: Transformations in Cultural Communication, RMIT 14th – 15th April, 2011

Transformations in Cultural Communication RMIT 14th – 15th April, 2011, Melbourne The first few years of social media brought new approaches to audience engagement, emphasising knowledge sharing through open platforms. As organisations explored the potential of social media, they focused on the impact this would have on their internal practices. Today there is growing emphasis on how these seemingly democratic forms of communication can support and develop culturally diverse audiences. Transformations in Cultural Communication offers a unique opportunity to draw together leading researchers and professionals in the field of cultural communication to explore the tangible ways in which social media can engage culturally diverse audiences. It draws on national and international experience in mobile technologies, education, cultural diversity and industry/community partnerships to address cultural diversity beyond the polemics of inclusion. This symposium provides an excellent opportunity to address highly charged and…