Tag: Lectures

The Joseph Burke Lecture 2010: Dr Lucy-Anne Hunt on Eastern Christian Art

The Fine Arts Network in collaboration with Art History, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne, present: The Joseph Burke Lecture 2010 Dr Lucy-Anne Hunt Professor and Head of Art, Faculty of Art & Design, Manchester Metropolitan University, England Eastern Christian Art and Culture: Convergence between Jerusalem, Greater Syria and Egypt between the 12th-14th Centuries Lucy-Anne Hunt’s interests and publications focus on cross-cultural analysis between Byzantine and Islamic, and Christian and Muslim art and culture in the Middle Ages through the study of Byzantine, Eastern Christian – especially Coptic and Syrian – as well as Crusader art. Date: Thursday 13 May 2010,  6.30pm Venue: Elisabeth Murdoch Theatre, University of Melbourne (Parkville). Free Public Lecture All Welcome.   Bookings not required Enquires: registrar@hildas.unimelb.edu.edu.au

Angela Ndalianis: Las Vegas as a Neo-Baroque City

The Friends of the Gallery Library Associate Professor Angela Ndalianis Cinema Studies Program, School of Culture & Communication The University of Melbourne ‘Las Vegas as Neo-Baroque City’ Thursday 29 April 2010, 6pm for 6.30pm Emerging in the mid twentieth century (when Disneyland opened its doors in 1955) the theme park created the ultimate trompe l’oeil effects that “collapsed the screen frame” by extending the fictional world of Disney animation into the social sphere. In researching the design of Disneyland and how its spaces would reach out to its navigators, Walt Disney learned many lessons from the urban design practices of earlier European traditions, including Le Notre’s axial designs for Louis XIV’s Versailles residence and gardens. But whereas the vast landscapes and buildings of Versailles stood as monuments to the grandeur of their aristocratic patron, King Louis XIV the Sun King,…

Terry Lane on Vanishing Sculptures: Australian Open Garden Scheme

Australia’s Open Garden Scheme Terry Lane on ‘The Vanishing Sculptures’ NGV International, Melbourne Wednesday 21 April 2010 Melbourne’s nineteenth-century fathers enriched the city’s gardens and art gallery with copies of classical and neoclassical sculptures. Just what were these statues and why were they removed from public view? Foremost authority on Australian art of the era, respected author and former senior curator at the National Gallery of Victoria, the inimitable, charming and entertaining Terence Lane will give an illustrated lecture which will reveal some at times surprising answers. Following the lecture, the Gallery’s sculpture garden is well worth a visit to view significant examples of modern public sculpture. Australia’s Open Garden Scheme is very grateful to the National Gallery of Victoria for its support of this event. Tickets $24 including morning tea. Wed 21 April 2010, 10.30am. Numbers are strictly limited…

Harrell Fletcher – Towards a tender society of thoughtful questions and answers

Harrell Fletcher – Towards a tender society of thoughtful questions and answers SATURDAY 20 MARCH, 12:30PM Clemenger BBDO auditorium NGV International 180 St Kilda Rd FREE Harrell Fletcher (b. 1967, lives and works in Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.) creates art through collaboration and participation often with those outside the parameters of the art world. From installing a museum focusing on local peoples’ lives in a northern California shopping mall to working with an eight-year-old boy as the principle decision-maker for a work of public art created for a park in Brittany, France, Fletcher’s art is really all about you, rather than all about him. Fletcher is developing a project for the NGV that opens this September. “People often ask how I’m able to entice random strangers into working with me. The answer is that I appear to actually be interested in the…

Dr Michael Brand – ‘Curating for the Common Good’

Dr Michael Brand, Director J. Paul Getty Museum 2005-2010, Miegunyah Distinguished Visiting Fellow. Curating for the Common Good Friday 12 March, 2010, 5.30-6.45 pm, Elisabeth Murdoch Lecture Theatre, University of Melbourne, Parkville. Curatorship straddles the middle ground between art collections placed on display for the public good and the discipline of art history that provides most of the tools for investigating the ideas and ideals that those works of art embody. Drawing upon experience as a curator in Australia and as a museum director in the United States, this lecture will look at issues confronting the practice of curatorship on both sides of the Pacific. Dr Brand’s lecture is the keynote address for the symposium, Interrogating Art Curatorship in Australia, which is being held on 13-14 March to celebrate twenty years of teaching art curatorship at the University of Melbourne.…

Amelia Douglas ‘Pierre Huyghe’ – FAN postdoctoral lecture.

Amelia Douglas Recipient of the 2009 Chancellor’s Prize for Excellence in the PhD, University of Melbourne Pierre Huyghe and the Association of Freed Time What is at stake in the making and recording of history, and what does it mean for a contemporary artist to work as an historiographer? The contemporary French artist Pierre Huyghe is well-known for his multi-faceted works that operate in the gaps between history and story. In this lecture, Huyghe’s practice is shown to facilitate a new model of contemporary history. History as a discursive concept is pliable; its meaning shifts depending on contexts. In presenting an historiographic reading of Huyghe’s practice, this lecture reflects upon how the coalescence of story and history may be a key factor in pulling together the diverse strands of Australian and international art histories. Pierre Huyghe is one of the most significant artists of the 21st century. His work –…

Margaret Manion Lecture 2009

Sophie Matthiesson Curator, International Art, National Gallery of Victoria Captive Markets: Artists in Prison in the French Revolution Hundreds of artists found themselves in prison during the French Revolution. While confined surprising numbers resumed painting, sculpting, drawing and even engraving. Few prisons were without some level or artistic production and exchange. Based on unpublished research of French prison archives and prison-made works of art, this lecture addresses some basic questions. Who were the artists, and why were they imprisoned? What did they make and for whom? Using select case studies, this talk will propose some basic categories and functions of the prison-made object and present a model for its interpretation. It will also consider some of the wider implications of this curious and little-known area of cultural production for our understanding of the political prison in France in the period…

Joseph Burke Lecture 2009 – Jason Smith

The Joseph Burke Lecture 2009 Jason Smith Director, Heide Museum of Modern Art Dark Theatres and Erotic Intensities: some thoughts on the works of Bacon, Henson, Booth and Boynes This lecture will be a further elaboration of my long standing interest in the humanist foundation of the works of many artists with whose practices I have interacted closely during my career. In this lecture I focus on the works of Francis Bacon, Bill Henson, Peter Booth and Robert Boynes as artists who were and are sensitive barometers of their times. Their works alert us to unpredictable and sometimes dire evolutions in culture by offering us images and ideas that are alternative to the mainstream. In his 1878 treatise Human, All Too Human, Friedrich Nietzsche suggested that if ‘someone doesn’t want to see something, they won’t.’ The works of Bacon, Henson,…