Tag: Lecture

Chris Kraus Keynote Lecture, Friday 14th October

Chris Kraus Keynote Lecture MUMA is honoured to present a keynote lecture by filmmaker, writer and editor Chris Kraus as part of the Chris Kraus exhibition opening at MUMA on Thursday 13th October.. In 2011, the New York Times described Kraus as ‘one of our smartest and most original writers on contemporary art and culture’; and her novel I Love Dick was cited by Frieze magazine as one of the most important books of the past two decades. Following the recent publication of Where Art Belongs, Semiotext(e) 2011, Chris Kraus presents a new lecture of expanded art and cultural criticism. Chris Kraus Chris Kraus is the author of Video Green: Los Angeles Art and The Triumph of Nothingness and the novels Aliens and Anorexia, I Love Dick, and Torpor. Kraus is the founding editor of the Semiotext(e) series ‘Native Agents’;…

Lecture: Reconstructing an Iconographical Program of the Palace of Nestor at Pylos: New Wall Paintings and Their Interpretation

Reconstructing an Iconographical Program of the Palace of Nestor at Pylos: New Wall Paintings and Their Interpretation Professor Jack Davis, University of Cincinnati Hosted by the Archaeological Institute at Athens, Classical Association of Victoria & The School of Historical & Philosophical Studies The Bronze Age ‘Palace of Nestor’ at Pylos, originally excavated by Carl Blegen in the 1950s, is unique in allowing investigators to consider its wall-paintings in context. In a great many instances it is possible to restore the entire iconographical program of decoration in a room or in an architectural complex. The discovery in 1995 of some 50,000 unpublished fragments of wall-paintings has resulted in the reconstruction of entirely new iconographical scenes and has contributed greatly to our knowledge of Bronze Age style and the technology of painting. Jack L. Davis is Carl W. Blegen Professor of Greek…

Lecture: ‘Feeling Stone’ Jeffrey Jerome Cohen

‘Feeling Stone’ Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (George Washington University) Our vocabulary for stone is impoverished. We describe rock as dumb, mute, unfeeling, unyielding, recalcitrant. Stone can sometimes be invoked as a witness, but most often its testimony is silent, an unfeeling trigger to affect, a passive reminder of tragic human histories. This talk excavates a lithic counter-tradition: stone not simply as a spur to human emotion, but as a lively substance possessed of agency, motility, artistry and possibly even a soul. Surveying work by medieval and contemporary thinkers, from Albertus Magnus and Geoffrey of Monmouth to Gilles Deleuze, Elizabeth Grosz and Roger Caillois, I argue that stone invites us to anonanthropocentric approach of ecologies, landscapes, texts and art. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen is Professor of English and Director of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute (MEMSI) at the George Washington University. He received his BA from…

Sir John Monash Lecture 2011: Whose Art Is It? Cultivating a Creative Community.

Sir John Monash Lecture 2011 Whose Art Is It? Cultivating a Creative Community Join the 2011 Sir John Monash Lecture panellists Bryan Dawe, artist and political satirist, Prof. Ruth Rentschler, Arts & Entertainment management, Deakin University, Julie Shiels, artist, and Stephen Zagala, MGA Curator, to have your say about creativity in Monash. The 2011 Sir John Monash Lecture is brought to you by the City of Monash Arts & Cultural Development Unit. Date: 10 August, 2011, 6.30PM at Venue: Monash Gallery of Art, 860 Ferntree Gully Road, Wheelers Hill, 3150 Bookings Essential: Ph. 8544 0500 or Email. mga@monash.vic.gov.au

Lecture: Kent Larson ‘Changing Places: Responsive housing, mobility systems, and networked intelligence for future cities’

Special Public Lecture Changing Places: Responsive housing, mobility systems, and networked intelligence for future cities Professor Kent Larson To meet the profound sustainability, demographic, and health challenges of the future, new strategies must be found for creating responsive places where people live and work, and the mobility systems that connect them. Professor Kent Larson will present the work of his MIT Media Lab research group to explore the intersection of high-performance housing with urban mobility-on-demand systems, including persuasive electric bike-lane vehicles to encourage exercise, the transformable live-work “CityHome” that functions as if it were much larger, and autonomous parking/charging technology. He will also review the group’s “Living Lab” experiments to better understand and respond to human activity in natural environments including sensing, algorithms, and interfaces for proactive health and energy conservation. Professor Larson brings his insights as an architect, researcher…

Lecture: Predicaments of Painting Indigenous Presence in Central Australia: Early Papunya Boards in Circulation, Fred Myers

Predicaments of Painting Indigenous Presence in Central Australia: Early Papunya Boards in Circulation Professor Fred Myers, Silver Professor of Anthropology, New York University This paper considers a predicament in the constitution of Aboriginal acrylic painting in Central Australia. Begun in 1971 as a translation of ritually-based designs into a new medium, the international success of the painting movement attests to their recontextualization from ‘ritual’ to ‘art.’ While much of the iconography in the early acrylic paintings was later considered inappropriate to have circulated – even in the art world – the paintings themselves have continued to be exhibited, and they are considered to be the most authentic forms of presenting authentic indigeneity. At the same time as Western Desert painters have always insisted on the paintings as revealing the indigenous claims to identification with the land, changing styles of painting and…

Lecture: The tale of the 1880 Atlas des Plans de Paris

The tale of the 1880 Atlas des Plans de Paris Michael Shirrefs Atlas des Plans de Paris is a remarkable book containing reproductions of ancient maps showing the development of Paris, from its beginnings in Roman times as a village in the middle of the Seine. Former Creative Fellow Michael Shirrefs will discuss his research into the book’s origins. This talk is part of the Collection Reflections series, in which State Library Creative Fellows and staff discuss the Library’s amazing collections and display fascinating collection items. It’s a free event, but bookings are required. Date: Tuesday 3 May 2011, 6:00pm – 7:00pm Cost: Free Bookings and Enquiries: Book online; Email bookings@slv.vic.gov.au; Tel 03 8664 7099. Venue: State Library of Victoria, Cowen Gallery, Level 2a (wheelchair accessible).

Lecture – Ronald Ridley ‘Team Tutankhamun’

Marion Adams Memorial Lecture Team Tutankhamun Professor Emeritus Ronald Ridley, Melbourne University Everyone knows the story of the discovery of the famous boy pharaoh’s tomb in 1922. A much more difficult matter for the historian of archaeology  is understanding the many people who made the discovery and then  revealed and preserved the tomb’s contents. This lecture will focus on Lord Carnarvon, Howard Carter and Harry Burton, while celebrating also the other members of the team. Date: 6:30pm, Tuesday 19th April 2011 Venue: Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building, The University of Melbourne, Parkville campus Public Lecture – All Welcome. Enquiries: Contact Margaret Sullivan at masu@unimelb.edu.au or (03) 8344 7775 website

Lecture – Paul Jett ‘Scientific Research on Ancient Chinese Gold and Silver’

Scientific Research on Ancient Chinese Gold and Silver Paul Jett, Head, Department of Conservation and Scientific Research, Freer Gallery of Art/Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C Scientific analysis combined with archaeological discoveries in China have greatly expanded the body of knowledge about gold and silver in early China.  This presentation will discuss three particular studies of gold and silver artifacts from China, focusing on silver from the Tang and Liao dynasties (7th to 12th centuries AD), and gold dating to the 5th to 3rd centuries BC. Biography – As the Head of Conservation and Scientific Research at the Freer Gallery/ Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Art at the Smithsonian Institution, Paul Jett is an internationally renowned scholar and practitioner in the field of conservation of Asian sculpture and metal artifacts. He has built important collaborations with Asia Institutes, has published regularly with a focus on technical studies of metalwork and sculpture and organized the biennial Forbes Symposium at the Freer Gallery of Art since 2001. Paul Jett is…

Lecture: Angus Trumble ‘Benjamin West and ‘The Venetian Secret’: Art and fraud in late Eighteenth-century London’

Benjamin West and ‘The Venetian Secret’: Art and fraud in late Eighteenth-century London Angus Trumble, Curator of Painting and Sculpture, Yale Center for British Art In this lecture, Angus Trumble will discuss the late eighteenth-century hoax that fooled several prominent British artists and sheds light on a number of intriguing technical and historical issues. In 1796 Benjamin West, the American-born President of the Royal Academy of Arts in London, fell victim to a remarkable fraud. A shadowy figure, Thomas Provis, and his artist daughter, Ann Jemima Provis, persuaded West that they possessed a copy of an old manuscript purporting to contain descriptions of materials and techniques used by the Venetian painters of the High Renaissance, including Titian, to achieve the famously luminous effects of colour that had long been thought lost, forgotten, or shrouded in secrecy. West experimented with these materials and…

Lecture – Nigel Morgan ‘Bible stories in a medieval English Psalter: educating Margaret de Lacy, Lady of Meath’

Professor Nigel Morgan, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge Bible stories in a medieval English Psalter: educating Margaret de Lacy, Lady of Meath Nigel Morgan, Honorary Professor at Corpus Christi College Cambridge, is one of the world’s leading historians of medieval art. His lecture focuses on a richly illustrated English Psalter (called today the Munich Golden Psalter) which will be published in facsimile later in 2011. Professor Morgan has written the commentary for this facsimile. He will discuss the educational impact of the Psalter’s illustrations, in the light of its probable owner, Margaret de Lacy, Lady of Meath. Date: 6.00 – 7.00pm, Thursday 27 January 2011 Venue: The Oratory, Newman College, University of Melbourne, 887 Swanston Street, Parkville (Melways Map 2B E5) All Welcome. Free Entry. Bookings essential Email: agehrig@academiccentre.stmarys.newman.unimelb.edu.au or phone 03 9342 1614 Seminar on digitisation of Medieval Manuscripts Professor Morgan is also giving a seminar at The State Library of Victoria on the digitisation…