Tag: Indigenous Art

Panel Discussion | Excellence and sustainability: the production and promotion of art through Aboriginal art centre programs

Excellence and sustainability: the production and promotion of art through Aboriginal art centre programs Saturday 24 August 2–3.30pm Several of the RAKA finalists are represented by Aboriginal owned and operated art centres in remote communities.  This discussion will explore the relationship between and interdependency of artists, art centres, gallerists and curators. How do these relationships affect the representation of Indigenous artists in art museums? Chair Janina Harding | Indigenous Art Program Manager, City of Melbourne and Executive Producer of Melbourne Indigenous Arts Festival Panel Bill Nuttall | Director of Niagara Galleries, Chairperson of the Melbourne Art Foundation, 2009–2012, represents artists from Warmun Art Centre and Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre. Suzette Wearne | Co-curator, Under the sun: the Kate Challis RAKA award 2013, Arts Administrator and Injalak Arts & Crafts Association, 2008–2010 Regina Pilawuk Wilson | Internationally exhibited artist, winner general painting category…

Lecture | Unlocking the Story Behind Kimberley Rock Art: New Perspectives – Archaeology, chronology and rock art in the north west Kimberley – Dr June Ross

Dr June Ross gives us the next chapter in the story begun by Grahame Walsh when he recognised the significance of the ancient rock art in the Kimberley.

The Change & Continuity project aims to establish a chronology and social context for the production of rock art in the region. The project has involved 23 researchers across a range of disciplines and two Indigenous communities.

Lecture | The science of conserving Gija art: How Indigenous and Western knowledge systems come together

 The science of conserving Gija art: How Indigenous and Western knowledge systems come together   The Melbourne Materials Institute (MMI) and the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation (CCMC) are pleased to invite you to “The science of conserving Gija art: How Indigenous and Western knowledge systems come together”. In March 2011, floods destroyed the Warmun Community and seriously damaged the significant Warmun Community Art Collection. From this catastrophic event has emerged an exciting engagement between scientists, artists, conservators and art managers that is expanding ways of thinking about art, science and cultural material. Come and join us for a unique insight into the art and science of Indigenous cultural materials conservation and the culture of the Gija people. Speakers A/Prof Robyn Sloggett will discuss the importance of incorporating Gija Indigenous knowledge into university-based research and training in art conservation. Dr…

National Indigenous Photo-Media Forum

National Indigenous Photo-Media Forum 8th – 10th February, 2012 Presented by Centre for Contemporary Photography (CCP) and the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) The Forum will present emerging and established Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander photographers and photo-media artists with the opportunity to join key photo-media industry specialists, artists and educators from across Australia. A series of presentations and workshops will run over two and a half days that will enable Indigenous artists and photographers to further develop industry and technical knowledge, whilst networking with artists and curators from across Australia. Confirmed speakers include: Patricia Adjei Indigenous Communications Coordinator and Legal Officer, Copyright Agency Limited Mervyn Bishop photographer Sally Brownbill photographer and educator Daniel Browning producer and presenter, Awaye!, ABC Radio Beck Cole filmmaker Michael Cook artist Robert Edwards National President, Australian Institute of Professional Photography Delwyn Everard…

Lecture – In the aftermath of Empire: performances of indigenous re-empowerment in Aotearoa New Zealand

In the aftermath of Empire: performances of indigenous re-empowerment in Aotearoa New Zealand Professor Jonathan Mane-Wheoki (The University of Auckland) Empires rise, empires fall. In their aftermath, all over the world, indigenous survivors of European imperialism – if there are survivors – are left to count the cost, to regroup in order to recover the integrity and ensure the continuity of their societies and cultures, following periods of intense subjugation. In the Treaty of Waitangi (1840) the British Crown guaranteed New Zealand’s indigenous people ownership of their properties and accorded them ‘all the rights and privileges of British subjects.’ What followed, however, was a long and sordid history of sequestration and disempowerment until the Treaty of Waitangi Act of 1975 provided the legal instrument by which the dispossessed could seek redress, politicised Maori and ignited a resurgence of Maori nationalism and culture.…

Fundraising Dinner for Warmun Community Art Collection, Oct 21st

Fundraising Dinner for Warmun Community Art Collection The Warmun Community Art Collection holds some fo the earliest eart produced in the Kimberley. The collection is of historic, spiritual, social, aesthetic, research, art historical and cultural significance. It is critical to our understanding of the Kimberley region, the contribution of the Catholic Church to culture, Australian art history, and Gija history. These works have influenced art that is held in museums and galleries around the world. Its survival is in jeapoardy and held is needed with its preservation. On the 13th March 2011 after weeks of heavy rainfall from a monsoonal trough, the rivers and tributaries in the east Kimberley were already filled when a further deluge ran across the land forming a torrent of water throughout the region. Nestled tightly on Turkey Creek, the Warmun community was ravaged. All of…

NGV Symposium – ‘Tjukurrtjanu: Origins of Western Desert Art’

NGV Symposium – ‘Tjukurrtjanu: Origins of Western Desert Art’ A range of speakers will discuss the origins and evolution of the Western Desert Art movement. Speakers include: Fred Myers, Silver Prof & Chair, Department of Anthropology, New York University Dr Philip Batty, Senior Curator, Anthropology (Central Australia), Museum Victoria Dick Kimber, historian & catalogue contributor Prof Paul Carter, Chair in Creative Place Research, Deakin University Paul Sweeney, Manager, Papunya Tula Artists Bobby West Tjupurrula, Papunya Tula artist About the Exhibition Tjukurrtjanu: Origins of Western Desert Art features over 200 of the first paintings produced at Papunya in 1971–72 by the founding artists of the Western Desert art movement. The exhibition includes works by artists such as Uta Uta Tjangala, Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi and Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula. Tjukurrtjanu establishes the connection between these first works on board and their iconographic sources: the ancestral designs that embellish objects, the…

Lecture: Predicaments of Painting Indigenous Presence in Central Australia: Early Papunya Boards in Circulation, Fred Myers

Predicaments of Painting Indigenous Presence in Central Australia: Early Papunya Boards in Circulation Professor Fred Myers, Silver Professor of Anthropology, New York University This paper considers a predicament in the constitution of Aboriginal acrylic painting in Central Australia. Begun in 1971 as a translation of ritually-based designs into a new medium, the international success of the painting movement attests to their recontextualization from ‘ritual’ to ‘art.’ While much of the iconography in the early acrylic paintings was later considered inappropriate to have circulated – even in the art world – the paintings themselves have continued to be exhibited, and they are considered to be the most authentic forms of presenting authentic indigeneity. At the same time as Western Desert painters have always insisted on the paintings as revealing the indigenous claims to identification with the land, changing styles of painting and…

Melbourne Conversations: Talk Blak, Talking back: Conversations on Political Blak Art

Media commentary and debate around Indigenous identity and history is a topical subject. Join the conversation around the contribution that politically engaged urban based contemporary Indigenous visual artists have made to issues of identity, culture, racism and history. Date: Thursday 2 June 2011 Time: 6.00pm to 7.30pm. Entry from 5.30pm Venue: BMW Edge, Federation Square, Corner Swanston and Flinders Streets, Melbourne Panellists: Mr Vernon Ah Kee – Visual Artists and member of collective proppaNOW, Queensland. Ms Bindi Cole – Visual Artist, Melbourne. Dr Tony Birch – Writer, Historian and Curator, Melbourne. Moderator: Daniel Browning, Producer/Presenter of Awaye! ABC Radio National. For more information see the Melbourne Conversations website.

Stop (the) Gap curator and artist talks – Adelaide

Stop(the)Gap curator and artist talks Stop(the)Gap curator Brenda L Croft and international Indigenous curatorial advisors Kathleen Ash-Milby (USA), David Garneau (Canada) and Megan Tamati-Quennell (Aotearoa/NZ) are joined by participating Stop(the)Gap artists including Genevieve Grieves, Alan Michelson, Lisa Reihana, r e a and Warwiick Thornton. To be chaired by Hetti Perkins. For further information 08 8302 0870, unisa.edu.au/samstagmuseum Venue: Bradley Forum, Level 5, Hawke Building, University of South Australia, City West campus, 55 North Terrace, Adelaide Date: 3.30pm Saturday 26 February 2011 All welcome, free admission About the exhibition Stop(the)Gap: International Indigenous art in motion, 24 February – 21 April 2011, Gallery 1 – 3 Some of the most provocative and illuminating moving image work today is being created by Indigenous new media artists – yet there has been no major international focus on this work until now. Stop(the)Gap is a major international Indigenous moving image project,…

Call for Papers: The World and World-Making in Art: Connectivities and Difference (Canberra 2011)

The World and World-Making in Art: Connectivities and Differences Humanities Research Centre, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia 11-13 August 2011 Deadline: Mar 3, 2011 This international conference coincides with the Humanities Research Centre’s theme for 2011 on ‘The World and World-Making in the Humanities and the Arts’. It complements two further HRC conferences in 2011 on World Literature and World History. The conference will explore a number of key issues in art discourses today and also address a central concern of the HRC’s theme in invoking the idea of world-making beyond cultural divides and instead, speaking ‘to a domain of human connectivity’. We seek to explore the significance of connectivities and differences in the field of art: its practices, histories, institutions, inclusions and exclusions, ethical concerns and theoretical and methodological approaches under the overarching theme of ‘the World and World-Making’. While much of the focus of the conference will inevitably be on…

Talk: Wayne Qulliam ‘Indigenous Artists in the Art World’

Wayne Qulliam Former Indigenous Artist of the Year and Walkely Award Winner Indigenous Artists in the Art World To be held in conjunction with the closure of the Utopia Art Exhibition, a collaboration between the University, Desert Knowledge And Mbantua Fine Art Gallery and Cultural Museum. Date: Thursday 21 October 2010m 5.30-7.30pm Venue: University Library, La Trobe University, Melbourne Campus (Bundoora) RSVP: Mick Coombes, La Trobe University, ph. 03 0479 6678 or email m.coombes@latrobe.edu.au Enquires: Mick Coombes, La Trobe University ph. 03 0479 6678 OR Miranda Daniels, Mbantua Foundation ph. 0437 729 601

Talk: David Hansen – ‘Seeing Truganini’

ABR Calbre Prize: Seeing Truganini The Wheeler Centre Auditorium Thursday 24th June The Australian Book Review’s Calibre Prize is an annual celebration of an outstanding essay. Dr David Hansen, discusses his winning essay ‘Seeing Truganini’ and the stigmas surrounding indigenous art with curators Brenda L Croft and Tony Brown. Further details are on the Wheeler Centre website. Chaired by Peter Mares. David Hansen Over the course of his career Dr David Hansen has curated or managed more than 80 exhibitions, including landmark projects such as John Glover and the Colonial Picturesque (2003), The Fifth Australian Sculpture Triennial (1993) and The Face of Australia (1988). Venue: The Wheeler Centre Auditorium, 176 Little Lonsdale Street, Melbourne. Time: 6:15pm -7:15pm, Thursday 24th June. Cost: Free but bookings are recommended, see the website for details http://wheelercentre.com/calendar/event/abr-calibre-prize-seeing-truganini