Tag: Cultural Heritage

Screening and Q and A | The Destruction of Memory – The War Against Culture, And The Battle to Save It | University of Melbourne

We’re pleased to extend an exclusive invitation to an upcoming documentary screening at the University of Melbourne. The Destruction of Memory explores the impact of war on cultural heritage. The purposeful destruction of buildings, books and art as part of war has wrought catastrophic results on every continent. Leading up to the destruction of historical cities such as Aleppo and Homs in Syria, this deep investigation spans over a period of more than 100 years. The Destruction of Memory takes a close look at the devastation of cultural, religious and historical heritage as a means to erase collective memory and identity and gain new insight into how such crimes against humanity have been combatted in international politics. Please click on the button below to confirm your attendance Date and Time: Thursday, 16 March 2017, 6:30-9:00pm Location: Kathleen Fitzpatrick Theatre, Arts West Building, University of…

Lecture | Reflectance Transformation Imaging and Photogrammetry – Carla Schroer and Mark Mudge | University of Melbourne

Reflectance Transformation Imaging and Photogrammetry: Computational Photography Techniques for Cultural, Historic, and Artistic Heritage   Through the generous support of The Association of Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Societies (ADFAS) ‘Patricia Robertson Fund’, the Gordon Darling Foundation and the University of Melbourne’s Grimwade Centre for the Conservation of Cultural Material, AICCM is very pleased announce a public lecture on computational photography techniques for cultural heritage, to be delivered by Carla Schroer and Mark Mudge, founding members of Cultural Heritage Imaging. This talk will present advances in robust, low-cost imaging tools from the emerging science, Computational Photography (CP). Embodying both reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) and photogrammetry, CP describes the purpose-driven, selective extraction of information from sequences of digital photographs. Both methods offer exciting new documentation options for the cultural heritage profession; this presentation aims to highlight the use of these tools…

Deakin University Cultural Heritage Seminar | Sybille Frank ‘Negotiating the German Colonial Past in Berlin’s African Quarter’

Negotiating the German Colonial Past in Berlin’s African Quarter | Sybille Frank (Technische Universtät Berlin and Alfred Deakin Institute Citizenship and Globalisation Visiting Scholar) This presentation will introduce the ongoing dispute over street names in Berlin’s Afrikanisches Viertel (African Quarter). In 1899, Berlin named two of its newly-built streets “Togo Street” and “Cameroon Street”. Togo and Cameroon had been proclaimed the first German colonies in 1884. By 1958, 22 Berlin streets had been named after African regions that had been colonized by the German Empire, or after German colonial protagonists. In 2004, several NGOs called for a renaming of some of these streets, igniting a fierce dispute over the heritage status of the German colonial past. Drawing on guided interviews and document analyses, the seminar will delineate how ‘insider’ and ‘outsider’ positions have been allocated in the debate over street names…

Lecture | Re-imagining Heritage Interpretation: Enchanting the Past-Future – Russell Staif | University of Melbourne

The lecture will canvas the issues raised in the speaker’s recent book, Re-imagining Heritage Interpretation; Enchanting the Past-Future (Ashgate, 2014). One of the peculiar features of the so-called ‘heritage industry’ is the separation between art galleries, museums and cultural heritage as fields of knowledge production. The latter lags behind the museum/art gallery sector partly because of institutional borders and bureaucratic silos and yet all three make claims about protecting ‘things’ from the past for the present/future. All three sectors ‘do’ conservation, education, research and stage/perform the material for visitors. Interpretation of objects/places/monuments for visitors/tourists, while common across all heritage sites (whatever the definition), has at non-museum heritage sites been locked into an information/education/on-site learning paradigm for decades. A critique of this paradigm, particularly in the face of digital media, was the starting point for my book. The lecture will look…

Symposium | Heritage Destruction in the Middle East: Beyond the Media Hype | Deakin University City Centre

The Middle East Studies Forum at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation welcomes you to a public half-day symposium. Convened by Dr Benjamin Isakhan and Professor Tim Winter. This half-day symposium focuses on the recent heritage destruction in Syria and Iraq by ISIS. Presenters will bring to the table a variety of interpretations on the factors driving the destruction and the challenges of mounting effective responses. Venue: Deakin University City Centre Date: 15th Oct 2015 5:00pm (3 hours) Website: http://www.deakin.edu.au/alfred-deakin-institute/events/heritage-destruction-in-the-middle-east-beyond-the-media-hype Topics and Speakers include: Panel 1: Documenting and Interpreting the Destruction Heritage Destruction under the ‘Islamic State’ – Dr Benjamin Isakhan, Deakin University What does ISIS Communicate Through Iconoclasm? – Dr Antonio Gonzalez, Deakin University ISIS Attacks on Shia Shrines: Responses of Shia Community – Dr Taghreed Jamal Al-deen, Deakin University Media Coverage of Heritage Destruction in the…