Tag: Asian Art

Public Conversation | Making Asian Art Public/s Event at MADA

Public Conversation | Friday 29 June 1–2.30pm, followed by light refreshments How are contemporary Asian artists and curators of Asian art working in new ways to make art matter to, and resonate with, society today? Join us for a public conversation inviting diverse perspectives on art and its public significance in rapidly changing cultural contexts in contemporary Asia. Guest Speakers: Mira Asriningtyas Indonesia Merv Espina Philippines Mark Teh Malaysia Suzann Victor Australia/Singapore Tintin Wulia Indonesia/Australia In conversation with: ​Associate Professor Tara McDowellFounding Director, Curatorial Practice, MADA Frances Barrett Independent Curator and Artist, and MADA Postgraduate Dr Michelle Antoinette ARC DECRA Fellow & Lecturer, Art History & Theory, MADA ​For more information on the Conversation and the speakers, visit the MADA website Lecture Theatre G1.04 Building G, MADA Monash University 900 Dandenong Road Caulfield East VIC 3145 Free, all welcome. Please RSVP. Supported by the Australian Research…

CFP | PhD Student Workshop – The Transnational in Asian Art | Canberra

The Transnational in Asian Art: Historical and Contemporary Contexts around Migration, Diaspora, Mobility and Cultural Flows Date: 28 September 2017 Venue: Centre for European Studies, Australian National University and National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Conveners: Caroline Turner, Jacqueline Lo, Elly Kent, Alex Burchmore (ANU) Lead speaker: Emeritus Professor Margo Machida (University of Connecticut) The Humanities Research Centre at the Australian National University Canberra is issuing a call to PhD scholars who would like to participate and present short papers on their thesis research, in an intensive one day Workshop on 28 September 2017 focussed on The Transnational in Asian Art. Themes Art in Asia has long responded to transnational contexts. The relatively recent delineation of national boundaries, and their permeation through globally imagined online communities, are layered over longstanding currents of migration, familial ties, trade, cultural, religious and educational exchange, war…

Sydney Asian Art Series Talks | Marketing Pleasure for Profit – Julie Nelson Davis

9 March, 6.00pm –Sydney Asian Art Series Marketing Pleasure for Profit: The Mirror of Yoshiwara Beauties, Compared – Julie Nelson Davis The University of Sydney China Studies Centre, The Power Institute and VisAsia is proud to present the first of our Sydney Asian Art Series talks, with a lecture by Professor Julie Nelson Davis. In Marketing Pleasure for Profit, Professor Davis will explore the production of the now famous eighteenth-century Japanese book of ‘performing beauties’ prints, The Mirror of Yoshiwara Beauties, Compared. LECTURE ABSTRACT Today, The Mirror of Yoshiwara Beauties, Compared is regarded as one of most remarkable printed books of eighteenth-century Japan. Featuring sumptuous illustrations by two leading ukiyo-e artists, Kitao Shigemasa and Katsukawa Shunshō, the book exploited full-color multiple block printing to represent the glamorous ‘beauties’ of the licensed Yoshiwara pleasure district. In her presentation, Professor Davis will discuss…

Call for Papers | Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories | Sydney October 2017

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories | An international symposium hosted by the Power Institute, University of Sydney, Australia, 11–13 October 2017 Proposals due 28 February 2017 Studies focused on gender in Southeast Asian societies have emerged, in recent decades, in approximate concurrence with the development of regionally focused Southeast Asian art histories. The founding premise of this international symposium is that there has hitherto been insufficient discursive intersection between these two fields. Topics discussed may include: 1. Accounts of individual artists and collectives whose work engages with gender; 2. Investigations of gender in the exhibitionary, critical, and historiographical receptions of works of art, from any period 3. Considerations of the relationships between artists and/or works of art and larger Southeast Asian cultural constructs of gender, as enacted in political, economic, religious and other domains. Proposals will be particularly welcomed for papers…

Lecture | Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda – Thai-Tanic-Three: Contemporary Thai Art in the Age of Constraints.

Photo of Professor Apinan Poshyananda

Professor Apinan Poshyananda will deliver the Keir Foundation Lecture on the emergence of Thai contemporary art. This lecture will close the three-day Symposium Regions of the Contemporary: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia, Saturday 5–Monday 7 November 2016, at the University of Melbourne. Free Public Lecture – All Welcome – Registration required as seating is limited. To register visit: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/keirfoundation Date: Monday, 7 November 2016, 3-4pm Venue: Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room, Level 1, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, Swanston Street, University of Melbourne Professor Dr. Apinan Poshyananda is former Permanent Secretary of Ministry of Culture, Thailand. He is art historian, critic, artist and curator who has been involved in Venice Biennale, Sydney Biennale, Istanbul Biennale, Liverpool Biennial, Yokohama Triennale, and Asia-Pacific Triennial. He was guest curator of Contemporary Art from Asia: Traditions/Tensions (New York, Vancouver, Perth, Taipei), Temple of the Mind…

Symposium | Regions of the Contemporary: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia

A three-day symposium to reflect on critical events for transnational contemporary art across Southeast Asia in the 1990s. Informed by recent archival research undertaken into Chiang Mai Social Installation (CMSI), an artist-initiated festival held in northern Thailand (see Simon Soon’s essay in the upcoming issue of Afterall), we propose three key questions for discussion: How did CMSI, and gatherings like it, inform and displace the more deliberate, institutional pictures of a region propagated elsewhere, for example by large triennials in Brisbane and Fukuoka? If Southeast Asia was still peripheral to the art world’s centres in the 1990s, its artists decisively joined that world during that decade, experimenting with art forms — performance, site-specific installation, participatory and so-called relational practices — that had special currency in the burgeoning global art circuit. But what was their currency within the region itself? Enquiries framed…

Conference | Moving Image Cultures in Asian Art | ANU

Dates: Friday, August 26, 2016 – 18:00 –Sunday, August 28, 2016 – 17:00 Venue: Sir Roland Wilson Building (#120), ANU Presented by the Australian Consortium on Asian Art, this conference addresses historical and contemporary manifestations of spatio-temporality in Asian art. It results from an understanding of sustained trajectories of spatio-temporal practices in various art traditions in the Asian region. In addition to the relatively recent international visibility of ‘new media’ art, there are pronounced instances of time and space being addressed together in various art traditions in across the Asian region, ranging from the murals of Ajanta and Dun Huang (Mogao) to contemporary video installations. The conference accommodates a broad interpretation of the theme, thinking about ‘moving image cultures’ as ways of comprehending and representing time in space. We are interested in understanding the moving image in Asian art as…

Online Resource | Back Issues of Ars Orientalis now available online

Thanks to a digitization effort made possible with help from Smithsonian Libraries and the Internet Archive, Ars Orientalis volumes 1 to 41 are now available to read online, free of charge. See the website here to browse the archive. About Ars Orientalis Ars Orientalis is a joint publication of the Freer Gallery of Art and University of Michigan’s History of Art Department. The journal is published annually and inldes peer-reviewed articles, as well as reviews of books on teh art and archaeology of Asia, the ancient Near-East, and the Islamic world. The journal is a collection of scholarship that crosses academic disciplines and aims to connect researchers, institutions, and ideas using one central theme per volume. The journal originated from the ideals of two visionary men: Charles Lang Freer, the Detroit industrialist who donated the art collection that formed the Freer Gallery…

Symposium | Asian Art Research in Australia and New Zealand: Past, Present, Future | University of Sydney

Date: 15 October 2015 A day-long symposium presented by the Power Institute and Department of Art History, at the University of Sydney ABSTRACT Since at least the 1940s, Asia has become an increasingly important point of orientation for Australia and New Zealand: politically, economically, demographically, and, of course, culturally. In this context, there has long been strong public interest in Asian art, sustaining dedicated galleries, significant original exhibitions, specialist organisations, arts festivals, and numerous exchange programmes. Nonetheless, the study of Asian art in Australia and New Zealand appears stubbornly diffuse. Australia and New Zealand boast successive generations of specialists working as educators, curators, researchers, artists, and ever growing numbers of students, yet we often remain separated by discipline, geography, institutional structures, and the variable resources that characterize local museum and library collections. Asian Art Research in Australia and New Zealand:…

Online Resource | Smithsonian Asian Art collection goes online

A story from the Art Newspaper that the Smithsonian Museum’s extensive collection of Asuian Art will all be available to browse online from 1 January next year. Part of a project by the Smithsonian to make its entire collection available online with open access.   The Smithsonian’s museums of Asian art in Washington, DC, are due to release their entire collections online on 1 January 2015. More than 40,000 works, from ancient Chinese jades to 13th-century Syrian metalwork and 19th-century Korans, will be accessible through high-resolution images without copyright restrictions for non-commercial use. The vast majority—nearly 35,000 objects—have never been seen by the public. The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery are the first Smithsonian museums and the only Asian art museums to complete the labour-intensive process of digitising and releasing their entire collections online. The project,…

Symposium | Tilting the World: Histories of Modern and Contemporary Asian Art

Tilting the World: Histories of Modern and Contemporary Asian Art A Symposium in Honour of Professor John Clark Organised by the Power Institute, University of Sydney, and the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Friday 29 November, 2013 | University of Sydney Saturday 30 November, 2013 | Art Gallery of New South Wales Website: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/power/about/symposiums.shtml The Power Institute in partnership with the Art Gallery of New South Wales, is proud to present Tilting the World: Histories of Modern and Contemporary Asian Art. Tilting the World is an ambitious symposium, which will bring to Sydney international experts and emerging scholars to discuss the past, present and future of Asian art. Collectively, this symposium asks: what is at stake in the study of modern and contemporary Asian art cultures today, particularly as we head into what is being styled “the Asian Century”? This significant event has been organised…

Funding: The Anne van Biema Fellowship, 2012, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

The Anne van Biema Fellowship, 2012, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC The Anne van Biema Fellowship was established by bequest to promote excellence in research and publication on the Japanese visual arts. Fellowships support research at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. Research proposals are evaluated in terms of merit, originality, methodology, and potential for significant publication that will advance scholarly and public understanding of the Japanese visual arts. Interdisciplinary proposals with a primary focus on Japanese visual arts are considered. Awards are made to scholars at the post-doctoral or equivalent professional level for periods of two to twelve months, and are not renewable. The maximum stipend of $42,000 per annum will be prorated for shorter terms. The Fellowship includes round-trip travel at U.S. government rates from the fellow’s residence…

Lecture: Alison Carroll, ‘The Revolutionary Century: Art in Asia 1900-2000’

Alison Carroll, curator and author, presents a lecture on Asian art in the twentieth century. There is a gap in our of knowledge of what connects the pre-twentieth century dominance of ‘traditional’ Asian arts and the rise of the internationally celebrated contemporary art of the region today. This lecture gives an overview of the main trends in the art of the region over the course of the twentieth century, from the iconoclastic young Japanese of the 1900s, to the passionate nation-building of artists in Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines mid century, and to the blossoming of artistic practice across all countries in the 1980s. Find out about a period too little known by us all, see images of near neighbours that parallel many artists in Australia and add to your understanding of this amazing region. Date: Wednesday May 18th, 6:30pm.…

Exhibition: Vernacular Cultures and Contemporary Art from Australia, India and the Philippines

Vernacular Cultures and Contemporary Art from Australia, India and the Philippines 3 May – 17 June LUMA | La Trobe University Museum of Art Curated as part of La Trobe University’s 2011 Festival of Ideas, this exhibition features contemporary artists whose work incorporates expressions of indigenous and/or locally specific popular cultures. Examining diverse practices that engage themes including surf culture, tattoo designs, informal architectural and colloquial language, the exhibition asks how contemporary artists remobolise vernacular cultures to interrogate and mediate the cultural ethics of globalisation. La Trobe University Museum of Art La Trobe University Ground floor, Glenn College Bundoora Campus Opening Hours: Mon – Fri, 10am – 5pm. Free admission http://www.latrobe.edu.au/luma

Symposium: Closing the Gap – Contemporary Indonesian Art

Closing the Gap – Contemporary Indonesian Art Symposium – February 5th 2011, 1pm onwards To celebrate the opening of Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art, MiFA is thrilled to host an afternoon of talks and discussion on art from our closest Northern neighbor. This event will provide the opportunity for key arts industry members to discuss the rise of contemporary Indonesian art, museums, the emergence of the contemporary Indonesian art market and the presence of contemporary Indonesian art in the global arena. 1pm – Part I: Museums v’s Market: Art Markets across Asia Leading academics and specialists discuss the distinct difference between the ‘Western’ art market and museum systems and the way in which art business is conducted in the East. This session will be chaired by Anita Archer and speakers include Dr Christopher Marshall and Dr Meaghan Wilson-Anastasios of…