Tag: Art History Lecture

Faculty of Arts Dean’s Lecture | Art and Detection: Investigating Louis Duffy, a Forgotten British Painter of the Second World War – Ted Gott | University of Melbourne

In September 2006 the National Gallery of Victoria acquired at auction a remarkable painting by a virtually unknown artist: Christ Turning Out the Money Lenders, a work attributed by the auction house to a ‘Louis Duffy, 20th century’. This impressively large painting shows sixteen men dressed in c. 1940 business suits, gathered in tense confrontation in a modern-day retelling of the New Testament account of Christ expelling the money changers from the Temple. In Duffy’s composition, the Temple setting has been transmuted into a modern graveyard, and the money changers have morphed into mid-20th-century arms dealers trading munitions on the graves of the dead, the ultimate profit-and-loss indicators of their grim transactions. The subsequent arrival of Duffy’s painting in Melbourne in late 2006 sparked considerable debate about the meaning and significance of the gallery’s new acquisition. Examination of the painting’s…

Lectures | David Solkin, Kate Retford and Martin Myrone on Portraiture | National Gallery of Victoria

A trio of public lectures on portraiture by three leading art historians: David H. Solkin FBA (Courtauld Institute of Art), Kate Retford (Birkbeck, University of London) and Martin Myrone (Tate Britain). These scholars are coming to Melbourne as part of the University of Melbourne’s international conference, Human Kind: Transforming Identity in British and Australian Portraits, 1700-1914 and will present three free lectures at the NGV. Information and bookings for the full Human Kind conference can be found here. David Solkin: English or European? Portraiture and the Politics of National Identity in Early Georgian Britain. Thursday 8 September, 6:00pm. Clemenger Theatre, National Gallery of Victoria (International). The influence of European art created a fundamental shift in British portraiture in the mid eighteenth-century. With some artists championing native tradition and others embracing Continental trends, a struggling national identity was played out in British portraiture.…

Exhibition and Talks | Opening weekend of A Golden of China: Qianlong Emperor 1736-1795 | NGV International

The exhibition A Golden of China: Qianlong Emperor 1736-1795 opens today at the NGV International. The exhibition draws on the collections of the Beijing’s Palace Museum in the Forbidden City to tell the story of the great eighteenth-century Qianlong Emperor who ruled China for almost sixty years. He was the fourth emperor of the Qing dynasty and the longest living emperor in Chinese history. The Qianlong Emperor’s long 60-year reign (1736–1795) was a particularly fascinating time in China’s history. Under his rule, China was the wealthiest and most populous nation in the world. Qianlong’s ability to preserve and foster his Manchu warrior-huntsman traditions whilst adopting the Confucian principles of political and cultural leadership, resulted in the successful governing of 150 million Chinese people. It was his ability to adopt Chinese ways, yet honour his Manchu traditions that made him one of the most successful emperors of the Qing dynasty. The Qianlong Emperor studied Chinese…

UPDATED Lecture | The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey

NB See details below for changed date and venue The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey, Bader Chair in Northern Baroque Art Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada Literary responses to paintings and prints by Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) and other artists of the early modern Netherlands show that art theorists and connoisseurs appreciated the artist’s ability to capture the emotional nuances of a subject. This lecture explores one fundamental aspect of emotional display, the shedding of tears, as represented in historical subjects and portraits. Visual and literary sources reveal patterns in the social significance of emotion, and specifically of sorrow, as related to gender and circumstance. The depiction of tearful emotion constituted a key element in the representation of human, especially female, subjectivity and prompted complex responses in contemporary…

Lecture | The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey

The Gift of Tears: Gender and Emotion in the Art of Rembrandt and his Contemporaries Stephanie S. Dickey, Bader Chair in Northern Baroque Art Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada Literary responses to paintings and prints by Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) and other artists of the early modern Netherlands show that art theorists and connoisseurs appreciated the artist’s ability to capture the emotional nuances of a subject. This lecture explores one fundamental aspect of emotional display, the shedding of tears, as represented in historical subjects and portraits. Visual and literary sources reveal patterns in the social significance of emotion, and specifically of sorrow, as related to gender and circumstance. The depiction of tearful emotion constituted a key element in the representation of human, especially female, subjectivity and prompted complex responses in contemporary viewers. Lecture presented by the ARC Centre of Excellence…

Public Lecture | Memory, Migration and the Monument: Commemorating the Irish Famine in Ireland and the Diaspora, Emily Mark-Fitzgerald

Memory, Migration and the Monument: Commemorating the Irish Famine in Ireland and the Diaspora Dr Emily Mark-FitzGerald, School of Art History & Cultural Policy University College Dublin As the watershed event of 19th century Ireland, the Great Famine’s political and social impacts profoundly shaped modern Ireland and the nations of its diaspora, yet for nearly 150 years any sense of a public or collective ‘memory’ of the Famine period has proved elusive. What changed, then, in the mid-1990s, to occasion the remarkable outpouring of public commemoration and sentiment (described in Irish media as a ‘Famine fever’) that swept across Ireland and the nations of its diaspora during the Famine’s 150th anniversary and reversed the trope of Famine ‘silence’? This presentation will discuss the complex history of the Famine’s place in memory and representation from the 19th century to the present:…

EVCS: Mark Shepheard, ‘Pompeo Batoni and his Roman Sitters: Portraits of the Sforza Cesarini’

Mark Shepheard ‘Pompeo Batoni and his Roman Sitters: Portraits of the Sforza Cesarini.’   This paper examines Pompeo Batoni’s two portraits of members of the Sforza Cesarini family: the portrait of Duke Gaetano II in Melbourne and that of a woman traditionally identified as Gaetano’s wife, which hangs today in Birmingham. It readdresses the question of the identity of the sitter in the Birmingham portrait, and explores the social function of portraiture within the Sforza Cesarini’s extensive art collection and the likely place of Batoni’s two portraits within that collection.The paper concludes with a discussion of Batoni’s portraits of Roman sitters and questions the oft-repeated view that the paucity of such portraits was the result of the low esteem in which portraiture was traditionally said to be held in eighteenth-century Italy. This paper is the result of research carried out…

Sugden Fellow Lecture: Associate Professor Jill Carrick – The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France

Sugden Fellow Lecture The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France Associate Professor Jill Carrick From the realistic laden tables of 17th Century Dutch still-lives to contemporary works of art that feature found objects and trash, artists have sought to depict vividly the material objects we use in everyday life. This lecture examines the found-object sculptures of two 1960s artists working in France—Daniel Spoerri and Arman—and explores the intriguing dialogue between past and present enacted in their works. Themes addressed in this lecture include memory and amnesia, postwar modernization, and consumerism. Jill Carrick is Associate Professor in Art History at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. She writes on French post-war art, and her publications include the first book in English on the 1960s group Nouveau Réalisme or ‘New Realism’. She is visiting Melbourne as the Sugden Fellow at Queen’s College…

Lecture: John Paoletti ‘Learn My Language: Strategies of Medici Patronage in Renaissance Florence’

The Bill Kent Foundation invites you to the Inaugural Bill Kent Memorial Lecture Professor John T. Paoletti Learn My Language: Strategies of Medici Patronage in Renaissance Florence Emeritus Professor John T. Paoletti is currently a Macgeorge Fellow at The University of Melbourne. He was Professor of Art History and the William R Kenan Professor of the Humanities at Wesleyan University. Co-author of Art in Renaissance Italy, a standard text on the subject (now in its third edition), he has also published widely on issues of patronage and on Michelangelo, and is currently completing a book on Michelangelo’s David. He co-edited a benchmark collection of essays – Renaissance Florence: A Social History (Cambridge University Press, 2006/2008) – which Bill Kent reviewed as ‘excellent’, full of ‘novel and stimulating information and insights’. For many years Professor Paoletti was editor of the prestigious…

Lecture – Chris McAuliffe ‘On fibbing considered as one of the fine arts’

UPDATE: RSVP extended to October 14th. The La Trobe University Alumni Art History Chapter presents, with the National Gallery of Victoria, the thirteenth annual Rae Alexander Lecture Dr Chris McAuliffe Director, Ian Potter Museum of Art (University of Melbourne) On fibbing considered as one of the fine arts Art, according to Picasso, is ‘the lie that tells the truth’. Artists demonstrate their talent for elegant fibbing both in their art and the comments they make upon it. Why are we so willing to accept without question the ‘beautiful lies’ that artists produce? And how does art history navigate truth and untruth in art? Dr Chris McAuliffe is Director of the Ian Potter Museum of Art at The University of Melbourne. Prior to that he was for ten years a lecturer in the Department of Fine Arts at The University of…

Lecture – Patrick McCaughey ‘In the end there is no such thing as art, only artists’

Public Lecture at The University of Melbourne Professor Patrick McCaughey ‘In the end there is no such thing as art, only artists’ In his lecture, Professor Patrick McCaughey will expatiate on the nature and significance of Art History – taking as his starting point the famous opening sentence from E. H. Gombrich’s The Story of Art (1950), ‘In the end there is no such thing as art only artists.’ Patrick McCaughey studied Fine Arts and English at the University of Melbourne and became art critic of The Age in 1966. After a period in New York on a Harkness Fellowship, he was appointed Professor of Visual Arts at Monash University in 1972 and went on to become Director of the National Gallery of Victoria in 1981. He left Australia in 1988 and was successively director of the Wadsworth Atheneum in…

Lecture – ‘Art History and the Diaspora: Ernst Gombrich and the problem of being a Viennese art historian in London’

Professor Richard Woodfield University of Glasgow Art History and the Diaspora: Ernst Gombrich and the problem of being a Viennese art historian in London 5-6:15 pm Friday 13th August Although Ernst Gombrich attained great eminence through his publications The Story of Art (1950) and Art and Illusion (1960), the precise nature of his work as a commentator on the academic practice of art history never really found a home in British art history. Unlike Erwin Panofsky, who adjusted to the American scene by dropping his commitment to abstract theory, Gombrich’s theoretical commitments were always at the front of his mind. Two of the great English art historians, Lord Clark and Francis Haskell, admitted that they never properly understood him. Norman Bryson, Gombrich’s arch-critic, failed even to recognise his involvement with semiotics decades before it became fashionable. Gombrich’s approach to art…

UPDATED DATE CHANGE: The 2010 Duldig Lecture on Sculpture: Städel Sculpture

Please Note the lecture is now on Saturday 19th at 3pm, after the Städel Symposium. Felix Krämer Head of the Städel Museum’s Collection of Nineteenth Century, Modern Painting and Sculpture The 2010 Duldig Lecture on Sculpture: Städel Sculpture The annual lecture of Sculpture is presented jointly by the Duldig Studio and the National Gallery of Victoria. This lecture will be presented by Felix Kramer head of the Städel Museum’s Collection of Nineteenth Century, Modern Painting and Sculpture. He will focus upon sculptures from within the collection of the Städel Museum collection by eminent European artists including Rodin, Renoir, Degas and Beckmann. Time: Saturday 19th June, 3pm Venue: Clemenger BBDO AUditorium, NGV Internation (St Kilda Rd, enter North entrance via the Arts Centre forecourt). Cost: Free (complimentary glass of sparkling wine on arrival). Enquiries and Bookings: 03 8662 1555, 10am –…

The 2010 Duldig Lecture on Sculpture: Städel Sculpture

Felix Krämer Head of the Städel Museum’s Collection of Nineteenth Century, Modern Painting and Sculpture The 2010 Duldig Lecture on Sculpture: Städel Sculpture The annual lecture of Sculpture is presented jointly by the Duldig Studio and the National Gallery of Victoria. This lecture will be presented by Felix Kramer head of the Städel Museum’s Collection of Nineteenth Century, Modern Painting and Sculpture. He will focus upon sculptures from within the collection of the Städel Museum collection by eminent European artists including Rodin, Renoir, Degas and Beckmann. Time: Monday 21st June, 6pm for a 6:30pm start. Venue: Clemenger BBDO AUditorium, NGV Internation (St Kilda Rd, enter North entrance via the Arts Centre forecourt). Cost: Free (complimentary glass of sparkling wine on arrival). Enquiries and Bookings: 03 8662 1555, 10am – 5pm.

Lecture: Sophie Matthieson ‘Drawing a Long Bow? Boccherini and the Madrid Visit’

The Friends of the Gallery Library ‘Drawing a Long Bow? Boccherini and the Madrid Visit’ Sophie Matthiesson Curator, International Art, National Gallery of Victoria Thursday 27 May, 2010, 6pm for 6.30pm This lecture follows the young virtuoso composer and cellist Luigi Boccherini to the Spanish court, where he arrived in 1768, aged twenty-four. The glittering cultural scene of Madrid and its surrounding royal palaces boasted some of Europe’s finest artists and attracted a stream of noble and diplomatic visitors and many key figures of the Enlightenment. In such a cosmopolitan milieu numerous opportunities existed for a portrait of this musical celebrity to be painted. The origins of the National Gallery of Victoria portrait of Luigi Boccherini continue to elude scholars and curators. This discussion opens up a new and unexplored avenue of inquiry, by proposing a Spanish context for its…