Tag: Art and Emotion

Symposium | The Emotions of Love in the Art of Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe | Melbourne

Save the date for the upcoming symposium presented by The Centre for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne and the National Gallery of Victoria The Emotions of Love in the Art of Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe Date: Thursday 4 May – Saturday 6 May 2017 Venue: Thursday and Friday – University of Melbourne, Woodward Conference Centre, 10th floor, Melbourne Law (Building 106), 185 Pelham Street, Carlton Venue: Saturday – The National Gallery of Victoria, Clemenger Auditorium, 180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne Convenors: Charles Zika and Angela Hesson Contact: Julie Davies (daviesja@unimelb.edu.au) Website: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/the-emotions-of-love-in-the-art-of-medieval-and-early-modern-europe/ Registrations: Opening soon! Love in Medieval and Early Modern Europe was a complex emotion, a constellation of feelings shaped and reflected by artists, writers and thinkers that sought to give expression to human experience and also provide models for individual and group behavior. Notions of love took different forms and…

Lecture | “Post Platonism: Rethinking the Relations of Art, Love and Desire – Professor James Grantham Turner | University of Melbourne

This lecture explores the “erotic revolution” that swept through aesthetic theory and artistic practice in the sixteenth century. Early modern “sex-positive” polemic denounced the false shame that devalues physical, sexual love, and targeted neo-Platonism, with its fierce rejection of corporeal sexuality and bodily sensation. The lecture traces the evolution of interpretations of Platonic Eros, expressed through important semantic changes in words like “lascivious” and “libido”, suddenly used in a positive sense during this period. Platonic anti-corporeality was absolutely rejected; but elements of the Platonic image of a graduated ascent, rising up on a ladder by a series of “steps” to attain the highest form of Love, were retained, and even amplified. Professor James Grantham Turner holds the James D. Hart Chair in English at the University of California, Berkeley.  His books include The Politics of Landscape: Rural Scenery and Society in…

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love Wednesdays 12, 19, and 26 April, 6.00pm-8.30pm Love, a complex emotion to say the least, has inspired artists and creative practitioners for centuries, generating countless artworks, objects, poems, books, musical compositions and films. Over three weeks this masterclass will explore the materiality, visions and sounds of love in response to the exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800 held at the National Gallery of Victoria (March 31- June 18 2017); a collaborative project produced with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne. Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800 draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe. While popular conceptions of love tend to focus upon romantic love, Love: Art of…

Workshop | Objects of Conversion/Objects of Emotion | University of Melbourne

Workshop image - map and teapot

From their first entrance in, even to their final end, the lives of our early modern forebears were bound up with matter: with material, tangible, resonant things. Utensils made of wood and pewter, clothing designed from wool and silk, books formed of parchment and ultimately paper. Likewise, the materiality of human bodies, even in death, preoccupied the early modern psyche, as the ubiquity of the memento mori in Renaissance art and theatre attests and as church reliquaries, to this day, still demonstrate. In this cross‐disciplinary workshop, Benjamin Schmidt and Paul Yachnin lead off a hands‐on examination of the emotional and conversional power of material objects. They will speak to particular objects of their research, and they will also interrogate the object‐subject relationship: how things are affective, and the effort early moderns made to affect things. Date: Tuesday 15 March 2016, 10:00am-12pm Venue: William…

Lecture | Scorn, Greed, Malevolence & Mischief: Goya’s graphic expression of emotions – Deanna Petherbridge | University of Melbourne

This presentation will examine the consummate skill with which Goya represents emotions in his late private albums and some of the print series associated with these drawings. From 1795-6 Goya borrows the figure of the bruja or witch as an historically subversive topos for portraying his disgust with a corrupt clergy, monarchy and cruel social order. As the proportions of his figures change in the album drawings so his ability to suggest subtlety of facial and bodily emotions in his brush and pen work deepens. Language also becomes more intense for Goya, isolated by his total deafness, and the texts appended to drawings and prints are variably metaphoric, playing with language/visual puns or seeming blocks to clarity of meaning. Like his drawings the titles become sparer but more esoteric, especially in his late self-imposed exile to Bordeux. The relationship between…

Study Day | Remembrance and The Expressive Arts | University of Melbourne

This innovative study day, which is open to scholars and the public alike, offers an opportunity to share research insights as well as critical reflection on practices and policies that engage the expressive arts for therapeutic uses in the act of remembrance. The day will include presentations by musicians, artists, writers, therapists, psychologists and history of emotions scholars and will engage the audience assembled in debate and information exchange. Date: Friday 11 September 2015 Time: 9.30am-5pm Venue: Theatre 227, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, 234 Queensberry Street (close to Lincoln Square and Queensberry Street tram stops, with some metred parking available on Queensberry Street, Carlton) This event will be FREE and a light buffet lunch with be provided. Registration and further information Registration is essential, places are restricted. Please note if bringing a special remembrance object. For many people, 9/11 is…

Lecture | Divided emotions, radical religions and apocalyptic expectations in the sixteenth-century Augsburg ‘Book of Miracles’ | Jenny Spinks

Sixteenth-century printed and manuscript wonder books compiled reports of comets, floods, earthquakes, monstrous births, and other terrifying and extraordinary phenomena. Such compendia appeared in great numbers after 1556, and German-language wonder books were produced most commonly in Switzerland and in northern German lands. Some wonder books also appeared before the mid-1550s, and in other German regions, although these are works that have received much less attention and analysis. This paper will examine a recently-discovered and richly illustrated manuscript wonder book that was produced in Augsburg in the late 1540s, during a period of intense religious and political division within the city around the 1548 Augsburg Interim. German-language wonder books generally reflect Lutheran or Swiss Protestant approaches to the interpretation of the natural world and the coming Last Days (which could evoke both joy and fear). Possibly uniquely, parts of this…

Study Day | Relics and Emotions – Centre for the History of Emotions

Centre for the History of Emotions | Relics and Emotions Study Day  March 21st 2014, University of Melbourne Relics are the bodily remains of saints, or objects that came into contact with saints during their lives or after their death. Relics may be preserved bodies or bones, either whole, as fragments, or as detachable body parts such as hair, teeth and blood. In the case of the resurrected body of Christ and the assumed body of the Virgin, Christ’s foreskin and the Virgin’s breast milk were venerated as relics. Items of clothing worn by saints, or the cloths in which bodily relics were wrapped, were also considered to be relics; as were footprints, and earth and rocks collected from holy sites. Such objects are understood by believers to be tangible links between heaven and earth, capable of channelling God’s power…

Conference | Fire Stories

A conference convened by The Centre for the History of Emotions and the Australian Centre, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne  includes two keynotes who will speak on fire and visual and material culture. Dates: Thursday 5th December and Friday 6th December 2013, ‘Fire Stories’. Venue: Alan Gilbert Building, Grattan Street, the University of Melbourne. Website About the Conference | Fire Stories Humans have struggled to control and harness fire since its discovery tens of thousands of years ago. This conference will address emotional responses to fires in literature and history, looking particularly at how the fleeting destruction of a blaze is conveyed in narrative terms. Participants will be invited to consider a dialogue between ancient and modern representations of fire (including the mythical) and the affective responses that they evoke. Speakers are also encouraged to address the role that…

Seminar Series | How to Feel: The Promise of Emotion

Presented by Centre for Contemporary Photography and the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, The University of Melbourne. Over three sessions this series will consider emotions from a range of disciplines, within the context of the exhibition True Self: David Rosetzky Selected Works. The Face (7 August) addresses crying and the expressed face in art and literature. Chair: Penelope Lee, CHE Melbourne Tom Whelan, Australian Catholic University      Stephanie Trigg, CHE, The University of Melbourne Christopher Chapman, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra         Public Space (14 August) presents three diverse approaches to emotion in public space, from the political, to the sacred and the performative. Chair: Kyla McFarlane, Centre for Contemporary Photography Jeff Kahn, Performance Space, Sydney Nikos Papastergiadis, School of Culture & Communication, University of Melbourne Catherine Czerw, Art Matters, CHE UWA  Music and Sound (21 August) will feature an…

Art History Seminars at Melbourne University | Semester 2

The program for art history seminars at the University of Melbourne for semester 2  is below. All seminars are held in The Linkway, John Medley Building, 4th floor (running between the East and West Towers), between 1-2 pm. All welcome. August 7              Anthony White | University of Melbourne Folk Machine: Fortunato Depero’s Cloth Pictures 1920-1925   August 21            Susanne Meurer | University of Western Australia Johann Neudörffer’s “Nachrichten” (1547): calligraphy and historiography in early modern Nuremberg   September 11   Gerard Vaughan | Professorial Fellow, University of Melbourne Museum Culture Today: Possibilities and Inhibitions   September 25   Toshio Watanabe | The University of the Arts, London Forgotten Japonisme: taste for Japanese art in Britain and North America 1910s – 1960s   October 9            Penelope Woods |  Centre for Emotions, University of Western Australia The Intentionality of Spectatorship: Emotions in…

Lecture | Art and Intimacy in 15th Century Italy, Professor Adrian Randolph

Art and Intimacy in 15th Century Italy Professor Adrian Randolph, Leon E. Williams Professor of Art History at Dartmouth College The word ‘intimacy’ is attractive partly because it summons up a set of interrelated and evocative meanings that speak directly to certain types of objects we tend to call art. Intimacy suggests proximity and closeness, and is tinged with sensual and perhaps sexual possibility, and, when applied to apparel, getting right next to the skin. This epidermal intimacy is matched by a form of interiority lodged etymologically in the word itself: The Latin word, moreover, when metaphorically appended to individuals, suggests an emotional as well as spatial proximity-an intimate acquaintance, someone close to you. These meanings, and others are suggestive. The word intimate points to something essential in reactions to certain types of objects, and to modes of beholding and…

Conference | Sacred Places, Pilgrimage and Emotions | University of Melbourne

Sacred Places, Pilgrimage and Emotions May 23-25, University of Melbourne This conference will explore the emotions created in response to sacred place or space from the late antique to the modern period and how these emotions are deployed to build ,strengthen and defend different forms of community and communal identity. There will be a focus on European pilgrimage sites and their associated rituals and material culture, between the twelfth and eighteenth centuries, particularly the way these sacred places promote collective and personal emotions through direct experience of a site or shrine, and through constructed or extended memory. Papers will also consider the continuities between these roles of pre-modern religious shrines and the emotional investment that underpins sacred place and commemoration in secular nations and states. Speakers: Peter Read, The University of Sydney (History) | Dee Dyas, The University of York…

Call for Papers | Sourcing Emotions in the Medieval and Early Modern World

Sourcing Emotions in the Medieval and Early Modern World This international conference will bring together scholars interested in exploring how we “source” emotions of the medieval and early modern period, whether by performing, acting, hearing, finding, or reading within the varied disciplines interested in this period. Abstracts are welcome on such questions as: Where we look for emotions in the extant sources How we ‘read’ across multiple source types to create a composite understanding of the emotions of a particular time period How we translate source information into practice in the performing arts Gendered nature of sources and gendered nature of emotions Sources, emotions and power: what are sources for understanding emotions in cross-cultural encounters? What do we have to take into account when interpreting them? Material objects as sources for the study of emotions Does the study of emotions…

Forum and Exhibition Viewing | The Four Horsemen: Apocalypse, Death and Disaster at the NGV

The Four Horsemen: Apocalypse, Death and Disaster  at the NGV The NGV will hold a forum with two distinguished speakers discuss key themes of the exhibition with particular reference to Dürer’s Apocalypse, the end of time and the representation of death. Presented in association with ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, The University of Melbourne. Keynote Speakers Prof Jeffrey Chipps Smith, University of Texas ‘Dürer’s Apocalypse: The End of the World or the Beginning of a Career? Prof Dagmar Eichberger, University of Trier, Germany ‘ The Rider of the Pale Horse: Depicting Death In Art’ Introduction to the Exhibition Cathy Leahy, Senior Curator, Prints & Drawings, NGV Date: Fri 31 Aug, 2–4pm (exhibition viewing from 4–5pm) Venue: Clemenger BBDO Auditorium, NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road Tickets: $18 Adult / $12 NGV Member / $14 Concession Information & bookings: Ph +61 3 8662…