Tag: 18th Century Art

Symposium | Circumnavigating Napoleon, National Gallery of Victoria

Circumnavigating Napoleon Symposium at NGV International, 21st July Leading international and local speakers will address key themes of the exhibition Napoleon: Revolution to Empire. Josephine and Malmaison – Dr Bernard Chevallier, leading Napoleon scholar Napoleon’s Propaganda, Artists and Horses – Jill, Duchess of Hamilton, author of Marengo, the Myth of Napoleon’s Horse Making Sense of Napoléon – Prof Peter McPhee, The University of Melbourne Napoleon’s Bad Behaviour – Assoc Prof Philip Dwyer, University of Newcastle Francois Péron and Terre Napoleon – Edward Duyker, Adjunct Professor, Australian Catholic University Napoleon’s Artists in Egypt and the Art of the Description – Dr Antoni Jach, author and painter Earthbound and airborne: the strange case of David and Napoleon – Prof Mark Ledbury, University of Sydney Cost: $85 A / $79 M / $82 C (includes morning & afternoon tea, exhibition entry not included). Date: Saturday 21st July, 10.30am–4.30pm. Venue: Clemenger BBDO…

Review | In Search of the Picturesque: The Architectural Ruin in Art Reviewed by David R. Marshall

In Search of the Picturesque: The Architectural Ruin in Art Reviewed by David R. Marshall In Search of the Picturesque: The Architectural Ruin in Art at Geelong Art Gallery (closing this Sunday 24th June). I have finally caught up with the exhibition In Search of the Picturesque: The Architectural Ruin in Art at Geelong Art Gallery (closing soon on 24 June) so go quickly if you haven’t done so already. This exhibition showcases Colin Holden’s collection of Old Master prints, to which have been added loans of paintings from the National Gallery of Victoria and Art Gallery of South Australia, prints from the State Library of Victoria, and various items from the Geelong Gallery collection and other sources. In the main room it is good to see some old favourites brought together: from the NGV there is the Panini Cumaean Sibyl…

Public Lecture | Modelling liberty – Clay sculptures in the prisons of the French Revolution Sophie Matthieson

2012 Duldig Lecture Modelling liberty – Clay sculptures in the prisons of the French Revolution Sophie Matthieson This lecture is associated with the 2012 Melbourne Winter Masterpieces exhibition Napoleon: Revolution to Empire. Sophie Matthiesson, curator and art historian of the French Revolution presents a little-known body of aesthetic artefacts from the French Revolution and examines it, for the first time, in terms of its wider significance. This lecture focuses on a group of highly accomplished clay sculptures modelled by artists imprisoned during the Terror and asks three questions: Who made them? How were they made? Why were they made? Speaker Sophie Matthiesson, Curator, International Art, NGV Date: 3pm, Saturday 2nd June 2012 Venue: Clemenger BBDO Auditorium, NGV International Bookings: Free (bookings essential), Code P1278, Book at Information Desk or Ph +61 3 8662 1555 10am-5pm daily

Symposium | Napoleon: Revolution to Empire

Napoleon: Revolution to Empire Leading international and local speakers will address key themes of the exhibition, including the surprising connections between France and Australia. Topics addressed will include the history of the Fondation Napoléon (the NGV’s partner and principal lender to this extraordinary exhibition) and its rich collections; Napoleon’s Coronation in 1804 and its music; France’s fascination with Australia in the period 1770–1820; and Napoleon’s 1812 Russian Campaign. Speakers Welcome Dr Gerard Vaughan, Director, NGV Victor-André Masséna, Prince d’Essling, Fondation Napoléon Duc de Rivoli, President, Fondation Napoléon Peter Hicks, Chargé d’affaires internationales, Fondation Napoléon Karine Huguenaud, exhibition co-curator, Fondation Napoléon François Houdecek, Responsable de projet, Fondation Napoléon Dr Ted Gott, Senior Curator, International Art, NGV Date: 10am- 1:30pm, Saturday June 2nd Venue: NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road, Clemenger BBDO Auditorium (enter north entrance, via Arts centre forecourt) Cost and Bookings: $85 Adult / $79…

Public Lecture | The Archbishop’s Piranesis: an unlikely collection for nineteenth-century Melbourne – Colin Holden

The Archbishop’s Piranesis: an unlikely collection for nineteenth-century Melbourne? Dr Colin Holden The lecture focuses on the greatest single collection of art among the Baillieu Library’s Rare Books, which is a complete set of the works of Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-78) whose images of classical ruins and Roman baroque streetscapes distil much of the culture of the eighteenth-century Grand Tour, and are masterpieces of eighteenth-century printmaking. Besides their intrinsic aesthetic value, the provenance of this set has an interesting connection with the University — they were part of the library of James Alipius Goold (1812-86), the first Catholic archbishop of Melbourne and a founding member of the University’s Council. This lecture examines their wider context: Goold’s extensive library, his training in Italy, collecting of art and interest in classical architecture, and the presence in several other nineteenth-century Melbourne homes and…

EVCS: Mark Shepheard, ‘Pompeo Batoni and his Roman Sitters: Portraits of the Sforza Cesarini’

Mark Shepheard ‘Pompeo Batoni and his Roman Sitters: Portraits of the Sforza Cesarini.’   This paper examines Pompeo Batoni’s two portraits of members of the Sforza Cesarini family: the portrait of Duke Gaetano II in Melbourne and that of a woman traditionally identified as Gaetano’s wife, which hangs today in Birmingham. It readdresses the question of the identity of the sitter in the Birmingham portrait, and explores the social function of portraiture within the Sforza Cesarini’s extensive art collection and the likely place of Batoni’s two portraits within that collection.The paper concludes with a discussion of Batoni’s portraits of Roman sitters and questions the oft-repeated view that the paucity of such portraits was the result of the low esteem in which portraiture was traditionally said to be held in eighteenth-century Italy. This paper is the result of research carried out…

CFP: Visual Culture and the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, London, Jul 12

Call for Papers Visual Culture and the Revolutionary & Napoleonic Wars Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG, July 19 – 20, 2012 Deadline: Dec 16, 2011 Confirmed Plenary Speakers: Mary Favret, Gillian Russell, Susan Siegfried, Paul White In July 2012, in advance of commemoration of the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo, Tate Britain is to host a two-day conference exploring the impact of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars on world-wide visual culture, from the outbreak of the pan-European conflict with France in 1792 to the present day. Centred on themed panels, plenary lectures and workshops, this cross-disciplinary conference will promote knowledge and understanding of the range of ways in which the ‘First Total War’ has been mediated in visual cultures, not only in Britain and continental Europe but throughout the world. The organisers are keen to receive proposals for papers that present new research and/or methodological approaches. In particular…

Lecture: ‘François Boucher, history painter’ Mark Ledbury, Power Professor, The University of Sydney NB Date CHANGE

Ursula Hoff Annual Lecture Ursula Hoff Annual Lecture: François Boucher, history painter Mark Ledbury, Power Professor, The University of Sydney For many, in the eighteenth century and after, Francois Boucher came to symbolize a malaise in French painting, an epoch where noble male ideals of history painting were abandoned in favour of the frivolous, the feminine, the decorative. But this is a skewed picture. This lecture seeks to reexamine Boucher’s career as a history painter, by exploring some overlooked or little known works by the painter, including the splendid pair in the NGV and by reconsidering what Boucher and his age understood history painting to be. It will also think about History painting as it was understood by Boucher’s predecessors and contemporaries to challenge some long held notions about what History painting is. Date: Wednesday 9th November 2011, 6:30pm Venue: Clemenger…

Lecture: Gerard Vaughan ‘Sex, Lies and Theft in the Late Eighteenth-Century: the Underbelly of the Taste for the Antique’

Sex, Lies and Theft in the Late Eighteenth-Century: the Underbelly of the Taste for the Antique Dr Gerard Vaughan AM, Director, National Gallery of Victoria The possession of antiquities of quality defined the taste of European elites of the late 18th century. As demand far outstripped supply, the search for antiquities often resulted in rampant forgeries, deception and criminal behaviour. Gerard Vaughan will offer a glimpse of the underbelly of neo-classical taste, discussing the antics of these passionate collectors and their dealers, and the strategies they devised to fulfil their desire. Presented by The Friends of the Gallery Library. Date: Tuesday, 18 October 2011, 6pm for 6.30pm Venue: Clemenger BBDO Auditorium, NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road, (enter North entrance, via the Arts Centre forecourt) Cost: Friends of the Gallery Library: Free, please give your name and specify that you…

John Weretka – Review: Pastel Portraits: Images of Eighteenth Century Europe. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 17 May 2011 – 14 August 2011

Exhibition Review Pastel Portraits: Images of Eighteenth Century Europe Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 17 May 2011 – 14 August 2011 Reviewed by John Weretka The eighteenth-century pastel portrait is the subject of a compact show of about forty images from 1711–1801 being hosted by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (17 May 17–18 August 2011).  Too often derided as a minor art, placing it on a level with other domestic entertainments such as the silhouette, pastel is revealed in this show as a highly nuanced, delicate and beautiful art form that in a sense has suffered by being too closely allied to the tastes of its own time.  In fact, as the inclusion of pastels by artists working elsewhere in oils shows, pastel was a worthy subject of attention for artists who would otherwise make themselves known…

Call for Papers: Johan Zoffany and his international contexts

Call for Papers Johan Zoffany and his international contexts Conference, 14 May 2012, at the Royal Academy of Arts and Geological Society, London The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, the Royal Academy of Arts, London, and the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, will be co-hosting a conference on Monday 14 May 2012 to accompany a major exhibition on the eighteenth-century Anglo-British artist Johan Zoffany (1733-1810). The exhibition, Johan Zoffany RA. Society Observed, is curated by Martin Postle (Paul Mellon Centre) with Gillian Forrester (Yale Center for British Art), and MaryAnne Stevens (Royal Academy), and will be held at the Yale Center for British Art from 27 October 2011 to 12 February 2012, and at the Royal Academy of Arts from 10 March to 10 June 2012. Born in Frankfurt in 1733, Johan Zoffany trained as an…

Lecture: From Court to Street-gang- Men’s Fashion in 18th-century West Europe Peter McNeil

From Court to Street-gang- Men’s Fashion in 18th-century West Europe Peter McNeil, Professor of Design History, University of Technology, Sydney This lecture explores a range of men’s dress cultures, from the rake to the macaroni; from the servant to the courtier; from the Incroyable to the Revolutionary street gangs called the jeunesse dorée (gilded youth) and the muscadins, who retained aspects of court dress as an affront to the authorities and the sans-culottes. Date: Sat 9 Jul, 3.30pm Cost: $18 Adult / $12 NGV Member / $14 Concession & Student. Bookings 8662 1555 (10am-5pm daily) (Event Code P1192) Venue: Clemenger BBDO Auditorium, NGV International

FULL PROGRAM: David Nichol Smith Conference in Eighteenth-Century Studies, Melbourne July 4-7 2011

David Nichol Smith Conference in Eighteenth-Century Studies Melbourne, 4-7 July 2011 The full program for the conference has now been finalised. Papers will be presented over four days from Monday 4th July to Thursday 7th July. Attendees can take out either a full four-day registration or a single day, receptions and conference dinner must be booked in addition to conference attendance. A registration form can be downloaded here David Nichol Smith conference registration 2011 (pdf). Single tickets for the keynotes held at the National Gallery of Victoria can be booked via the NGV, see their website for more detail. There are concession prices for student, unwaged and retired attendees. For all enquiries and to register please contact Jennifer Ellis jennifer.ellis@latrobe.edu.au Keynote Speakers Monday 4th July 9:30am Welcome. Keynote by Robert Shoemaker (University of Sheffield): Criminal Lives and the Making of Modern…

Conference: David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies, Melbourne July 4-8, 2011

14th Australasian David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies Melbourne 4-8 July 2011 UPDATED: Full Program now available here. Hosted by La Trobe University with international speakers from England, France, Italy, Poland, Russia, New Zealand, Turkey, and America who will present papers on a range of topics on the long Eighteenth Century. Keynote Speakers Robert Shoemaker, University of Sheffield Elena Marasinova, Moscow State University and Insitute of History, Russian Academy of Science Douglas Fordham, University of Virginia Vincent Denis, University of Paris – Sorbonne Constantine Michaelides, Washington University in St Louis Shirine Hamadeh, Rice University, Texas and The American University in Beirut Chloe Chard, London Wendy Bracewell, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London Karin Wolfe, British School at Rome Mark Ledbury, University of Sydney Conference Sessions Include: Cosmopolitanism and Nationalism Sensibilities and Sociabilities [1] Lived, [2]…

Review – Watteau: The Drawings. Royal Academy, London. 12 March – 5 June 2011. David R. Marshall

Watteau: The Drawings Royal Academy, London. 12 March – 5 June 2011 Reviewed by David R. Marshall This exhibition is organized for the Royal Academy and curated by Pierre Rosenberg and Louis-Antoine Prat, and based on their 1996 catalogue of Watteau drawings. In his essay Prat points out that the number of drawings (90) is less than at the big Watteau exhibition of 1984-85, but that the selection is more focused and unproblematic. The bulk of the drawings are from the Louvre and British Museum, but there are a number from other collections not often seen. The drawings are displayed in the Sackler wing of the Royal Academy, already showing its age, with it’s weird open lift shaft between the exterior facades of two buildings, and gallery spaces that work well enough in a routine way. On a Monday lunchtime late…