Lecture | Preserving Afghanistan’s Rich Heritage – Robyn Sloggett

A collapsible nomadic crown, (Tillya tepe), 100 BC - 100 AD National Museum of Afghanistan Photo © Thierry Ollivier / Musée Guimet via Melbourne Museum website

Preserving Afghanistan’s Rich Heritage Afghanistan’s cultural objects tell the stories of some of the world’s most significant events, interactions and exchanges. They have been collected as part of war and conquest, peace and scholarship, through legitimate trade and illegal looting, and are preserved in institutions around the world. In this lecture Robyn Sloggett examines the ways in which these rare and precious objects have been cared for and explores the threats that make cultural objects vulnerable to destruction, deterioration and loss. Robyn Sloggett is Director of the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation at the University of Melbourne. Her research interests include attribution and authentication of Australian paintings, the development of materials conservation in the Asia-Pacific, collection development and history, scientific…

19th International Symposium on Electronic Art, Sydney June 2013

ISEAlogo

19th International Symposium on Electronic Art Sydney Australia, 7 – 16 June 2013 The 19th International Symposium on Electronic Art — presented by the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) and supported by Destination NSW to align with Vivid Sydney — will showcase the best media artworks and future-focused ideas from Australia and around the world Projects will take place at the Powerhouse Museum, The Rocks Pop-Up, Carriageworks, 107 Projects, the College of Fine Arts UNSW, COFA’s Kudos Gallery, Tin Sheds Gallery, Verge Gallery, UTS Gallery and DAB LAB, Artspace as well as at a Parramatta hub. Projects will also link to Darwin, the Tasmanian Wilderness and Indonesia to Sydney. The ISEA 2013 exhibition program will showcase the works of…

Seminar | Made in Italy Futurism: the magnificent beauty of the mechanised velocity

Adams

Made in Italy Futurism: the magnificent beauty of the mechanised velocity Antonino L. Nielfi NB Date corrected 29th May NOT 28th. This seminar draws from the theoretical framework of the exhibition “SPEED: The Magnificent Beauty of the Mechanised Velocity” (currently in preparation for the end of 2014/ the beginning of 2015), curated by Antonino Nielfi for the Italian Embassy of Australia (Canberra, ACT). As a whole, this project aims to illustrate the origins and the technological advancement of Italian industrial design from its early years in the 1900s to the end of the Second World War, as it has been masterly witnessed by the artistic research of Italian Futurism, whose insights and findings have evolved overtime into what is known today as the Made in…

Vibrant Matter: Artists in Conversation | TarraWarra Museum of Art

Jon Cattapan Absence Field III 2011 oil on canvas, 185 x 250 cm Acquired 2012, TarraWarra Museum of Art collection

Jon Cattapan, Robert Owen and Yvonne Audette whose works are currently on show in the TWMA feature exhibition Vibrant Matter, will join curator Anthony Fitzpatrick for a lively conversation about the development of Australian abstract art. Jon Cattapan, who recently won the $80,000 Bulgari Art Award, is renowned for his contemporary cityscapes; Robert Owen, whose work is distinguished by a celebration of geometric colour, represented Australia at the 38th Venice Biennale; Senior Australian artist Yvonne Audette who has been described as Australia’s most dynamic and exciting abstract expressionist, has had over 60 years experience as an artist and is known for lyrical abstract paintings richly layered with marks and symbols. Date: Sunday 2nd June, 4.00-5.20pm Artists in Conversation, 5.20-6.00pm Refreshments…

Opportunities | Jobs, Funding, Calls for Papers | May 24th 2013

Jobs Professor of Art History for SCAD Hong Kong – deadline 20th August 2013 Lecturer in Wall Painting Conservation, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London – deadline 14th June 2013 Kress Interpretive Fellowship for 2013-2014, Metropolitan Museum of Art – deadline 28th May 2013 Funding David Saunders Founder’s Grant, SAHANZ to support new research in architectural history and theory – deadline 1st June 2013 National Humanities Center (US) 40 residential fellowships – deadline 1st October 2013 Calls for Papers The Mediterranean and the Iberian South in the medieval age: Culture, Identity and Heritage (V – XV centuries) – deadline 30th June 2013 Pirosmani and Georgian Culture (Tbilisi, 5-8 Nov 13) – deadline 30th June 2013 2nd international conference on…

Review | The New Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. Reviewed by Arnold Witte.

Rijksmuseum. Photo credit: Iwan Baan. Image courtesy of Rijksmuseum

The New Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam In April, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam was reopened to the public, after almost ten years of restoration and rebuilding. What started out in 2004 as a four-year enterprise to liberate the landmark building, built in 1885 by the Dutch Neo-Gothic architect Pierre Cuypers, from its later additions, turned out to be a lengthy and very expensive story of endless delays and complications. This led to heated discussions in the national media on several issues. The Spanish architects of the refurbishment, Cruz y Ortiz, were especially astonished about the debate on the use of the public passage under the museum by cyclists, which complicated the issue of where the entrance to the museum should be located.…

Artist Talk | Viv Miller at Holmesglen

Sunbeams and Rocks, 2011 (detail) oil, enamel, pencil and acrylic on linen 180 x 150cm © Viv Miller

Viv Miller Free lunch time lecture The Holmesglen Collection of Contemporary Art includes Viv Miller’s striking painting, Sunbeams and Rocks, 2011. When the artist started making work for the exhibition that included this painting, she acknowledged that the sun was a big subject (metaphorically and literally) to take on. “I was drawn to it because it seemed impossible to create pictures of it. It’s an omnipresent force that you can’t even look at. The most you can do is sneak a glance and feel its assault”. Subsequently, the sun has become a central motif in Miller’s iconography. The artist draws on a range of source material for her work including romanticism, computer graphics, geometric abstraction, graphic art, illustration and animation.…

Lecture | The Trauma of the Political – or, Catch Me I’m Falling (into the Ambivalent Arms of Law)

gertrude contemporary discipline

Gertrude – Discipline Contemporary Art Lecture Series The Trauma of the Political – or, Catch Me I’m Falling (into the Ambivalent Arms of Law) Dr Juliet Rogers in conversation with Maria Tumarkin There is an excitement about falling that betrays itself in images and experiences of the flesh, from Richard Drew’s capture of the Falling Man during September 11, 2001, to climate change activists’ depictions of the psychosis of not believing we will hit the ground, and the suspended nature of the work of William Kentridge. Art and falling go hand in hand, Rogers suggests, and so too does politics. We can see the current politics of the liberal democratic, in which sovereign aggression is excused by sovereign care. Where…

MUMA Exhibition and Public Programs | Direct Democracy

Direct Democracy (Raquelle Ormella, 'Poetic possibilities' 2012)

About the Exhibition Direct Democracy explores the changing nature of our engagement with the democratic tradition and looks to the emergence of new democratic models. The exhibition reflects contemporary social movements, unrest and the desire for change; modelling key social dynamics and possible futures. In Direct Democracy destruction and resistance are connected with the need to collaborate and rebuild. Recent political shifts such as the Arab Spring, the global financial crisis and movements such as Occupy are considered in relation to earlier struggles for autonomy and self-definition, as well as the interplay of constructive and corrosive dynamics in leadership and governance. The exhibition examines the shifting forms of political agency, in both emerging and foundational democracies. Direct Democracy continues MUMA’s…

Opportunities | Jobs, Funding, Calls for Papers | May 17th 2013

Jobs Lecturer Level A or B in Painting, School of Art, Research School of Humanities and the Arts, ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences – deadline 9th June 2013 Museum Victoria hiring a range of postions including Loans Manager, Image Management Officer etc – see MV website for details Departmental Lecturer in Classical Art and Archaeology, University of Oxford, Faculty of Classics, Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies – deadline 7th June 2013 Lectureship in Contemporary Art/ Art After 1945, University of Essex -School of Philosophy and Art History – deadline 9th June 2013 Senior Lecturer/Reader in Art Education, Goldsmiths, University of London -Educational Studies – deadline not specified Funding Kluge Fellowships, Library of Congress for research in…

Lecture | Michael Fried on Thomas Demand’s ‘Pacific Sun’

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Dean’s Lecture | Thomas Demand’s Pacific Sun Professor Michael Fried, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore In 2011 the German artist Thomas Demand made a two-minute stop-motion film called “Pacific Sun.” Michael Fried will show this film and analyse it in detail, with a view to explaining what he regards as its particular significance in and for the present situation in the visual arts. Michael Fried is a poet, art historian, art critic and literary critic. He is Professor, J. R. Herbert Boone Chair in the Humanities (secondary appointment: Department of the History of Art) at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. He has written extensively about an array of subjects, spanning abstract painting and sculpture since World War II to French painting and…

NGV Short Course | Visions of Paradise – The art and history of garden design

Temple of Ancient Virtue, Stowe

In conjunction with the  exhibition ‘Monet’s Garden’ the National Gallery of Victoria is running a short course on history of garden and landscape design. A series of nine lectures presented by art historians and academics in landscape architecture will explores the art and history of garden design from the Italian Renaissance to today. You can book for the whole course or individual lectures. See th full program below. Venue: Clemenger BBDO Auditorium, NGV International, St Kilda Rd Bookings: Ph +61 3 8662 1555 (10am-5pm daily), Event CodeP1341 Cost: $20 adult / $16 members / $18 concession (per lecture) | $170 adult / $125 members / $152 concession (full series) Website: http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/whats-on/programs/public-programs/short-course-visions-of-paradise-the-art-and-history-of-garden-design Program Sat 25 May, 2pm | Nature as model: The Italian Renaissance…

Call for Papers | EMAJ 7

Deadline 30th June 2013 The editors of EMAJ are now calling for articles to be submitted for EMAJ 7 to be published in November 2013. EMAJ welcomes monographic articles about specific artists or art collectives as well as thematic or theoretical analyses of art history from any historical period. Established and emerging researchers working within the fields of art history, architectural history, curatorship, politics and aesthetics, visual culture, philosophy, historiography and museum studies are encouraged to submit. Manuscripts must be submitted by email to emaj.editors@gmail.com, as word documents (.doc) only. Articles can be between 5000-10000 words in length (if shorter or longer please email the editors to discuss your article before submitting) and accompanied by: a 200 word abstract a brief…

Exhibition Review | Monet’s Garden at the National Gallery of Victoria. Reviewed by David R. Marshall

Unknown Claude Monet outside his house at Giverny 1921 autochrome 18.0 x 24.0 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris © Patrice Schmidt /musée d'Orsay distribution RMN

The latest NGV exhibition is, again, sourced largely from a secondary French museum (the Musée Marmottan Monet, henceforth MMM). Monet exhibitions have traditionally draw large crowds, and are much loved by gallery directors needing to feed the political machines to which they are beholden that equate numbers with success. But if ‘Monet’ is the brand of brands for art exhibitions, for organisers there is the problem of finding new ways to give a Monet show intellectual credibility and thematic coherence, while marketeers may feel the need to enrich a brand that runs the risk of becoming stale. And, given the economics of international exhibitions in Australia, the bulk of the works need to come from a single source. Hence Monet’s Garden.

‘Monet’s Garden’ is an idea rich in possibilities: it connects cultural tourism (a trip to Giverny) with high-art glorification of artistic genius. While previous NGV exhibitions have emphasised, through videos, places associated with the objects on display (notably the Musée Moreau in the Moreau exhibition and Malmaison with Napoleon), Monet’s Garden takes the place/artwork nexus one step further. I once taught a subject in art history on the history of gardens called Visions of Paradise: Art of the Garden, a title stolen from a picture book by Marina Schinz, and did a week on Monet and Giverny. One of the essay questions was whether Monet was a better gardener than painter. This generated some interesting responses. By asking this question one is forced to look at his Giverny paintings differently: as topographical painting, subordinate to the place represented, rather than a this-is-a-work-of-genius painting. It is quite intriguing, after studying the now well-known colour photos of Monet in his garden nearest the house (e.g. pp. xxiv-xxv of the catalogue) (Fig. 1), to be able to identity what the paintings actually represent. The strength of Impressionism was that it accepted the facts and went from there, so that its underpinning of visual factuality is there if you choose to look. A visit to the waterlily pond at Giverny makes you realise that his Nymphéas paintings are much more realistic than you had thought when you saw them in a gallery (Figs. 3, 14). This helps us to see Monet differently: as the last of the estate topographers, rather than as a wannabee modernist abstractionist.