Lecture | Skin Deep: Reading Emotion on Early Modern Bodies – Prof Evelyn Welch

This lecture will explore the ways emotion was understood on the body’s surface and how this was represented both materially and visually in early modern Europe. Based on traditional medical theories, early modern skin was often described as a ‘fishing net’, something that held the body in place and offered a decorative surface but had no function of its own. At the same time, the body’s surface also told you about its interior wellbeing. Learning to read the body meant both examining the exterior and sampling the interior’s waste products ranging from urine to hair and tears. This approach was as true of animals as it was of people. Manuals described how to read faces and skin, and argued for and against blushing. You could also predict astrological futures by reading the lines on foreheads as well as on hands…

Call for Papers and Performances – The Magic Lantern in Australia and the World: An Interdisciplinary Conference | Canberra, September 2018

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: 30 MARCH 2018 4-6 September 2018 | ANU School of Art & Design, Canberra Contact: elisa.decourcy@anu.edu.au Affect / Animation / Aparatuses & Technology /  Cinema / Digital Humanities /Entertainment / Evangelism / Exploration / Globalisation & Trade / Heritage Studies Media Archaeology / Performance & Reenactment / Photography / Illusion, Optics & Phantasmagoria / Science Communication / Missionary Histories From its development in the colonial period, to its echoes in today’s multimedia spaces, the magic lantern, along with its thousands of photographic and hand-painted slides, has had a pervasive and lasting impact on visual culture. Historians are just discovering its powerful presence in entertainment, education, science, religion, politics and advertising. Galleries, libraries and archives are uncovering untouched caches of slides in their collections. And artists and performers are rekindling the ‘magic’ of the technology. The Australian Research…

Job | Marti Friedlander Lectureship in Photographic Practices and History | University of Auckland

Marti Friedlander Lectureship in Photographic Practices and History The University of Auckland is home to the leading and most comprehensive Arts Faculty in New Zealand, ranked 28 in the QS World University Rankings by Faculty for 2018. At the heart of the Faculty of Arts is its commitment to preparing young New Zealanders to be global citizens and influencers, making it a hub of intellectual leadership. The University of Auckland is the largest provider of art historical scholarship in New Zealand. The Art History programme sits within the School of Humanities and offers a full range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses that range from historical European and American arts through the arts of the Pacific to contemporary art and cultural heritage. This is a permanent full-time position, at Lecturer or Senior Lecturer level (equivalent to tenured Assistant/Associate Professor level in…

Lecture | The Good Room: Viennese Designers in Australia – Professor Harriet Edquist | Duldig Studio

During the postwar period the modern family home assumed a special place for Australians. Planning for modernity became key activities for budding home-makers. In 1945 “The Australian Home Beautiful”, published a series of articles entitled “Joanna Plans A Home” which was a frank and exploratory dialogue between an Australian housewife and a Viennese émigré designer. Through the eyes of Joanna, Harriet Edquist, Professor of Architectural History at RMIT, examines the influence of Viennese émigré designers in Australia, to expose a more complex picture of the impact of émigré and refugee Viennese designers and architects on modern Australian design practice. Melbourne Design Week is an initiative of the Victorian Government in collaboration with the NGV. For the Full Program head to: www.ngv.vic.gov.au/melbourne-design-week/ Date: Thu. 22 March 2018, 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm Venue: Duldig Studio 92 Burke Road, Malvern East Cost:…

Lecture | ‘Eye of the Sixties: Richard Bellamy’ an influential, posterity-averse art dealer – Dr Judith E. Stein, Writer and Curator | University of Melbourne

During the early 1960s in New York, the Chinese-American art dealer Richard Bellamy (d. 1998) ran the fabled Green Gallery on Fifty- Seventh Street where he launched the careers of many of today’s iconic Pop, minimalist and maverick artists. In an illustrated talk based on her engrossing biography, Eye of the Sixties, Richard Bellamy and the Transformation of Modern Art, (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2016), Stein brings alive this beatnik with a legendary eye who was the first to show Claes Oldenburg and James Rosenquist, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin, Mark di Suvero and George Segal, as well as Yayoi Kusama’s sculpture and Warhol’s printed money. He even brokered Yoko Ono’s first sale. “There was nobody like Bellamy. I certainly consider myself his pupil,” art dealer Leo Castelli later reflected. Judith Stein is a writer and curator specialising in post-war…

Full program now available | Devotion, Objects and Emotion, 1300-1700 symposium

Religion is a cultural field in which emotions exercise a preeminent role. Feelings are integral to religion, and their significance is encapsulated in the concept of religious devotion. This symposium will focus on the relationships between religious devotion, objects and emotion in Europe between 1300 and 1700. Religious devotion promotes the exercise of a wide range of emotional expressions and behaviours that assume, communicate and give shape to the broader religious belief systems and cosmologies of which they are part. Objects used in religious practices accrue the power to arouse, channel and mediate our emotions; while their materiality and use in devotional practice can expand our understanding of the historical layering and expression of religious emotions, and how they change over time. In this way, devotional practices and objects provide a rich vantage point from which to explore the multifarious…

Symposium Devotion, Objects and Emotion, 1300–1700 | Registrations Now Open

Friday and Saturday, 16-17 March 2018. Registrations Now Open: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/devotion-objects-and-emotion-1300-1700/ Program: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/media/259673/devotions-lowres.pdf Contact for further enquiries: Julie Davies, daviesja@unimelb.edu.au , or 8344 5981 Religion is a cultural field in which emotions exercise a preeminent role. Feelings are integral to religion, and their significance is encapsulated in the concept of religious devotion. This symposium will focus on the relationships between religious devotion, objects and emotion in Europe between 1300 and 1700. Religious devotion promotes the exercise of a wide range of emotional expressions and behaviours that assume, communicate and give shape to the broader religious belief systems and cosmologies of which they are part. Objects used in religious practices accrue the power to arouse, channel and mediate our emotions; while their materiality and use in devotional practice can expand our understanding of the historical layering and expression of religious emotions, and…

Keir Lectures on Art | Chardin’s Girls: The Ethics of Painting | Professor Ewa Lajer-Burcharth

Free Public Lecture | Keir Lectures on Art: Chardin’s Girls: The Ethics of Painting will be held Thursday, 8 March 2018. Professor Ewa Lajer-Burcharth, William Dorr Boardman Professor of Fine Arts in the Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University. What did it mean to be a girl in the 18th century? Professor Ewa Lajer-Burcharth examines 18th-century French painter Jean- Baptiste-Siméon Chardin’s intriguing depictions of young adults as images of emergent subjectivity. Lajer-Burcharth’s lecture considers the complex ethics of these representations of a nascent gendered self. Ewa Lajer-Burcharth is William Dorr Boardman Professor of Fine Arts in the Department of History of Art & Architecture at Harvard University. A specialist in eighteenth- and nineteenth century French art, she has also written extensively on contemporary art, including, among others, the artists such as Janine Antoni, Gary Hill, Mona Hatoum,…

News | New Buxton Contemporary Director and Inaugural Exhibition Announced

The new Buxton Contemporary at the University of Melbourne’s College of the Arts will open on the 9th March, with the opening celebrations designed to coincide with the beginning of the 2018 university academic year. The inaugural exhibition, The Shape of Things to Come has been curated by Melissa Keys. It will feature works by more than 20 artists from the Buxton collection, and explores the various roles and agencies of the artist through culture, society and politics—as visionaries, storytellers, dissenters and alchemists. Included will be major works by Ricky Swallow, Emily Floyd, Hany Armanious and Mikala Dwyer among many others. Future programming will use the Michael Buxton Collection as a springboard to captivate and educate audiences on trends in contemporary art and connect current Australian contemporary practice to international developments. The University of Melbourne has announced that Ryan Johnston…

Artbank Open Day | 24th March 2018

Artbank will launch its new Collingwood premises by opening its doors to all on Saturday 24 March, offering the opportunity to go behind-the-scenes and view one of the largest collections of contemporary Australian art in the world. Eventbrite invite here: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/artbank-open-house-tickets-42660945035 The Artbank Open House is designed to promote the accessibility of the Artbank collection and to provide the opportunity to see some great examples of contemporary Australian art. Part of a renewed presence in Melbourne, the Open House is one of a number of new initiatives which include: A new non-residential Studio Program, which offers creatives practicing in the visual arts (including artists, curators, writers, designers and academics) the opportunity to realize projects and progress their work in an architecturally purpose-designed space with its own laneway access, all within the increasingly unaffordable city fringe.  Residents will be selected via…