Expressions of interest for opportunity as emaj Sub-Editor issue 5, 2010

Applications now open www.melbourneartjournal.unimelb.edu.au/E-MAJ Masters and Art History PhD candidates are encouraged to apply Deadline: 15 April 2010 emaj (electronic Melbourne art journal) is the only online, refereed art history journal published in Australia. emaj aims to provide an international forum for the publication of original academic research in all areas and periods of art history. emaj welcomes monographic articles about specific artists or art collectives as well as thematic or theoretical analyses on aspects of art history. emaj is published annually by the Fine Arts Network and is edited by art history graduates and post-graduates from the University of Melbourne. Our aim for the position of Sub-Editor is to provide an emerging editor / art historian with the opportunity to expand their editorial skills and professional development in the production of a high quality, online, academic publication. The Sub-Editor…

Dr Michael Brand – ‘Curating for the Common Good’

Dr Michael Brand, Director J. Paul Getty Museum 2005-2010, Miegunyah Distinguished Visiting Fellow. Curating for the Common Good Friday 12 March, 2010, 5.30-6.45 pm, Elisabeth Murdoch Lecture Theatre, University of Melbourne, Parkville. Curatorship straddles the middle ground between art collections placed on display for the public good and the discipline of art history that provides most of the tools for investigating the ideas and ideals that those works of art embody. Drawing upon experience as a curator in Australia and as a museum director in the United States, this lecture will look at issues confronting the practice of curatorship on both sides of the Pacific. Dr Brand’s lecture is the keynote address for the symposium, Interrogating Art Curatorship in Australia, which is being held on 13-14 March to celebrate twenty years of teaching art curatorship at the University of Melbourne.…

Symposium – Interrogating Art Curatorship in Australia (University of Melbourne, Parkville)

An international conference to be held at the University of Melbourne on 12 (evening), 13 and 14 March 2010, interrogating the practice of art curatorship in Australia now, and in the recent past. The program is conceived in celebration of twenty years of art curatorship at the University of Melbourne. It has been organized in conjunction with the launch of the initiative to establish the Australian Institute of Art History at the University of Melbourne. Keynote speaker Michael Brand, Director, J. Paul Getty Museum, 2005-2010 Miegunyah Visiting Fellow, 2010. Symposium speakers include: Anthony Bond; Joanna Bosse; Jane Clark; Alison Carroll; Rebecca Coates; Charlotte Day; Max Delany; David Elliott; Juliana Engberg; Stephen Gilchrist; Alexi Glass-Kantor; Charles Green; Alison Inglis; Jeff Kahn; Rachel Kent; Frances Lindsay; Ruth McDougall; Kyla McFarlane; Christopher Marshall; Hannah Matthews; Karen Quinlan; Patrick Pound; Jason Smith; Daniel Thomas…

JSTOR Auction catalogues online – open access till June 2010

JSTOR is collaborating with the Frick Collection and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in a pilot project funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to understand how auction catalogs can be best preserved for the long-term and made most easily accessible for scholarly use. Auction catalogs are vital for provenance research as well as for the study of art markets and the history of collecting. This prototype site is open to the public through June 2010. If you are interested in this content and the importance to art research, you are encouraged to try the site and take a brief survey. In June, we will evaluate use of the content and the feedback we have received in order to help determine the future of the resource. http://auctioncatalogs.jstor.org/

‘Garters and Petticoats’: Winterhalter’s 1843 Portraits of Victoria and Albert

The Early Modern Visual Culture Seminar returns for 2010. Eugene Barilo von Reisberg ‘Garters and Petticoats’: Winterhalter’s 1843 Portraits of Victoria and Albert What does official royal iconography tell us? What messages does it communicate about the sitters – and from the sitters? This paper deconstructs two official portraits of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert painted by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873) in 1843. It outlines the complex semantic layering within this pair of British royal portraits, and explores in particular the emphasis on Prince Albert’s newly-acquired ‘Englishness’ and the notion of an iconographic ‘gender reversal’ within the context of traditional marital pendants. March 8 2010 6.30pm Room 150 Elisabeth Murdoch Building, Parkville Campus All Welcome Please RSVP Mark Shepheard (shepm@unimelb.edu.au) if you plan to join us for dinner in Lygon Street afterwards. For further details on Eugene’s research on Winterhalter please visit his website…

Frick Collection: Fellowship in the History of Collecting

Deadline: April 31 2010 The Center for the History of Collecting in America was established in 2007 to stimulate awareness and study of the formation of fine and decorative arts collections from Colonial times to the present, while asserting the relevance of this subject to art and cultural history. The Center’s academic and public programs provide a forum for thoughtful exchange that may expand and further stimulate scholarship in this discipline. Through its Fellowship Program, the Center seeks not only to encourage research on the history of collecting in America, but also to expand the field’s still limited body of literature. At present the Center offers a number of short-term (6 – 8 weeks) fellowships for graduate and pre-doctoral students and for post-doctoral and senior scholars. In addition the Center offers long-term Leon Levy Fellowships for post-doctoral and senior scholars.…

CFP for Conferences on Sculpture, Pre Raphaelites & William Morris and Trecento Art

The practical problems of sculpture CFP Renaissance Society of America 2011 Paper abstracts that address topics regarding practical problems of sculpture and its European or even global exchange in the Early Modern period–such as transport, materials acquisition, customs and other expenses and other related issues, problems of reception in different cultural contexts from its original production site, or issues in cross-cultural sculpture collecting or commissions–should be sent to kelley.didio@uvm.edu by 15 May 2010. Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Art History Department of Art and Art History University of Vermont ——- “Useful & Beautiful: The Transatlantic Arts of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites” University of Delaware, Winterthur Museum and Country Estate, Delaware Art Museum, 7-9 October 2010 Deadline for submissions is 15 March 2010 “Useful and Beautiful: The Transatlantic Arts of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites” will be…

Painting for Profit in 17th century Italy – Upcoming Book and online Database

Painting for Profit: The Economic Lives of Seventeenth-Century Italian Painters by Richard Spear and Philip Sohm with contributions by  Renata Ago, Elena Fumagalli, Richard Goldthwaite, Christopher Marshall and Raffaella Morselli. In this highly original book five leading art historians team up with two distinguished economic and social historians to investigate the financial worlds of painters in Baroque Italy. Exploring the many variables that determined the prices asked or received by painters—including the status of their patrons, the size of works and time spent making them, their subject matter, and their number of figures—the authors offer major insights into the social lives, psychological disposition, and economic circumstances of a wide range of major and minor artists. Richard Spear is Professor Emeritus of Art History at Oberlin College and Affiliate Research Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. Philip Sohm is University…

CFP: Australian Early Medieval Association Conference – ‘Courage and Cowardice’

AEMA’s seventh annual conference will be held from 18-19 November 2010 at the Old Senate Room, Irwin Street Building, The University of Western Australia. This symposium will explore the subject of courage and cowardice in the early medieval world, c.300-1100, across a range of disciplines. Paper proposals from any relevant areas of study are welcome. Possible approaches and themes may include: representations in literature, culture and the arts; intellectual and religious understandings; social attitudes; gender implications; anthropological approaches; archaeologies of courage and cowardice. Papers on all subjects of the early medieval world will be considered, but those adhering to the theme will be given priority if a large number of abstracts are received. Abstracts of c. 300 words for a 20-minute paper are now being called for from interested participants.  Submissions of 3 x 20 minute paper panel proposals are…

History of the Accademia di San Luca in Rome – Archival Documents now online

A new online archive of interest to scholars of Italian art history. History of the Accademia di San Luca The History of the Accademia di San Luca, c. 1590–1635: Documents from the Archivio di Stato di Roma brings together a body of largely unpublished notarial records from the Trenta Notai Capitolini (TNC) found in the Archivio di Stato di Roma (ASR), many previously thought lost, concerning the institutional history of the Accademia. This new material sheds light on the foundation, operation, administration, and financial management of the academy from its origins in the late 16th century to its consolidation as a well-regarded institution in the 1630s. The Database The searchable database of this Web site provides access to a complete transcription of every extant notarial record of the period from the Archivio di Stato di Roma identified by the project…