Category: Events

Conferences, symposia, talks, walks and other art events in Melbourne and further afield.

Heritage Roadshow

Do you have wartime artefacts at home? Do you know their significance or how to care for them? Learn from Australia’s top preservation experts about how to keep your family’s wartime heritage items safe in your home for future generations to enjoy, and bring your objects along for personalised advice. Australia’s experience of war, especially in the First and Second World Wars, helped shape our sense of ourselves as a nation and as a community with a distinctive ethos and way of life. To provide opportunities for future generations to understand, investigate and value these experiences, we must ensure that siginificant material relating to Australia’s war heritage is preserved, not just in official national and state institutions, but also in personal, family and community collections. The Department of Premier and Cabinet – Veterans Branch and the Grimwade Centre for Cultural…

Book Launch | Photography and Collaboration: From Conceptual Art to Crowdsourcing – Daniel Palmer | NGV

Saturday 18 March, 1.30PM NGV International Melbourne Art Book Fair Discussion Space Part of Melbourne Art Book Fair 2017 FREE ENTRY. No booking required. Website. Photography and Collaboration: From Conceptual Art to Crowdsourcing offers a fresh perspective on existing debates in art photography and on the act of photography in general. Offering new arguments about photographic practice and collaboration, Palmer’s work is an invaluable contribution to the history of photography and contemporary art writing. Published by Bloomsbury. SpeakersDaniel Palmer Daniel Palmer is Associate Dean of Graduate Research and Associate Professor in the Art History & Theory Program at MADA (Monash Art, Design & Architecture). His books include The Culture of Photography in Public Space (Intellect 2015), edited with Anne Marsh and Melissa Miles, and Twelve Australian Photo Artists (Piper Press, 2009), co-authored with Blair French. Charles Green Charles Green is Professor of…

International Symposium | Parallel Histories: Nineteenth-Century Australian and American Landscape Painting |

The landscape of ideas, explorer artists, the pastoral arcadia of settlers, and the natural wilderness will be surveyed in Not As The Songs Of Other Lands exhibition at the Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne. Recalling sentimental landscapes in the manner of Claude Lorrain (1600-1682) and so-called ‘improved landscapes’ with the inclusion of mercantile, agricultural and industrial iconography, this Symposium will highlight the introduction of American theories of perception and visual representations of materiality and ideology in the landscape, especially when positioned alongside the Australian interpretation of Indigenous landscapes and cultures. There are many parallels to be found in the representation of such complex cultural heritage. This symposium will activate these ideas beyond the scope of the exhibition space. Join us as we examine the connections between the depiction of landscape, and the visual representation of myth and…

Seminar | Cabinet Secrets – Martha Pollak | University of Melbourne

This seminar, presented by Professor Martha Pollak, explores cabinets like those once owned by the diarist, ecologist, and wannabe urbanist John Evelyn in the context of the secretive inclinations of the mid-seventeenth century, and with the search for meaning in objects and nature. When the Victoria and Albert Museum recently reopened its early modern galleries of decorative arts, among the large objects stood John Evelyn’s imposing cabinet made of pietre dure and ebony (W24-1977). Its inclusion in the “European” rather than English galleries signified the position of the much-quoted diarist, ecologist, and wannabe urbanist as an influential traveller to the continent. This sizeable and costly piece of show furniture was not, however, the only such item that Evelyn had brought back in his clobber from the continent. A much more modest museum in London, the Geffrye (styled as the Museum of…

Seminar | European Renaissance prints with Professor Anne Dunlop | Baillieu Library

This informal object-based learning seminar examines works of art from the Baillieu Library Print Collection first hand. Prints and drawings by artist such as, Albrecht Dürer, Raphael and Andrea Mantegna are spotlighted, and asked a series of questions. Some of the secrets about the technical and stylistic achievements of these major practitioners of the European Renaissance will be revealed. Professor Dunlop is the Herald Chair of Fine Arts, and the coordinator of the subject European Renaissance Art. Please note that food, drink, bags and biros are not permitted near the works of art. Date: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm, Thursday 23 March 2017 Venue: Leigh Scott Room, Level 1, Baillieu Library, University of Melbourne Free but bookings required here: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/european-renaissance-prints-with-proffessor-anne-dunlop-tickets-32311610898

Screening and Q and A | The Destruction of Memory – The War Against Culture, And The Battle to Save It | University of Melbourne

We’re pleased to extend an exclusive invitation to an upcoming documentary screening at the University of Melbourne. The Destruction of Memory explores the impact of war on cultural heritage. The purposeful destruction of buildings, books and art as part of war has wrought catastrophic results on every continent. Leading up to the destruction of historical cities such as Aleppo and Homs in Syria, this deep investigation spans over a period of more than 100 years. The Destruction of Memory takes a close look at the devastation of cultural, religious and historical heritage as a means to erase collective memory and identity and gain new insight into how such crimes against humanity have been combatted in international politics. Please click on the button below to confirm your attendance Date and Time: Thursday, 16 March 2017, 6:30-9:00pm Location: Kathleen Fitzpatrick Theatre, Arts West Building, University of…

Exhibition and Public Programs | Her Place: Women in the West

Her Place WOmen in the West Exhibition image

Her Place: Women in the West honours the lives and contributions of women in Melbourne’s west. The second in a series of exhibitions presented by Her Place Women’s Museum, it celebrates the work, achievements and historical significance of women through moving image, photographs, biographical accounts and personal artefacts. The exhibition tells the stories of ten women from the western suburbs of Melbourne. These women have contributed to Australian society at both national and local levels through their work as artists and activists, writers and scientists, businesswomen, lawyers and community leaders. The group includes a former state premier and the AFL’s first female coach. The exhibition is accompanied by a program of public discussions, educational programs and workshops that explore current and topical issues affecting women of all ages today. PANEL DISCUSSION Everyday Documents and Australian Women’s History: Why Archives Matter Wednesday 15…

Lecture | “Post Platonism: Rethinking the Relations of Art, Love and Desire – Professor James Grantham Turner | University of Melbourne

This lecture explores the “erotic revolution” that swept through aesthetic theory and artistic practice in the sixteenth century. Early modern “sex-positive” polemic denounced the false shame that devalues physical, sexual love, and targeted neo-Platonism, with its fierce rejection of corporeal sexuality and bodily sensation. The lecture traces the evolution of interpretations of Platonic Eros, expressed through important semantic changes in words like “lascivious” and “libido”, suddenly used in a positive sense during this period. Platonic anti-corporeality was absolutely rejected; but elements of the Platonic image of a graduated ascent, rising up on a ladder by a series of “steps” to attain the highest form of Love, were retained, and even amplified. Professor James Grantham Turner holds the James D. Hart Chair in English at the University of California, Berkeley.  His books include The Politics of Landscape: Rural Scenery and Society in…

Robert Wilson Decorative Arts Lecture | The Throne Chair – Wolf Burchard | NGV International

The Throne Chair - A Symbol of Status from Antiquity to the Present Day for the Robert Wilson Annual Decorate Arts Lecture 2017. Queen Victoria’s Ivory Throne, India 1840-50, The Royal Collection © Her Majesty The Queen (RCIN 1561) © Her Majesty The Queen

Almost every human culture has created furniture or established seating arrangements that reflect hierarchical distinctions within their society. Wolf Burchard revisits the history of the throne chair from antiquity to the present day, and explores its function and design based on the most intriguing examples known to survive. Speaker Wolf Burchard, Furniture Research Curator, National Trust, London Date: Monday 20th March, 6.30PM Venue: NGV International, Clemenger BBDO Auditorium (enter north entrance, via Arts Centre forecourt) Free but bookings required at: http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/program/the-throne-chair-a-symbol-of-status-from-antiquity-to-the-present-day/

Discussion | What has Religion to do with Art?: A panel on Art and the Order of Existence | Power Institute, Sydney

Thomas Crow, Hannah Williams, and Dr. Florian Knothe in conversation with Mark Ledbury The Power Institute with Sydney Ideas is pleased to invite you to a panel discussion on the role that religion plays in the making and understanding of art. This will be followed by the launch of Thomas Crow’s new book, No Idols: The Missing Theology of Art. Date: Wednesday 15th March 2017, 6-8pm Venue: Law School Foyer, Level 2 Law School Annex, Eastern Avenue,Camperdown Campus, The University of Sydney Cost: Free and open to all with registration requested here.   LECTURE ABSTRACT Much of what we call art today was created in religious contexts and for spaces of ritual or worship – and many artists of our own ‘secular’ age have been heavily inspired by religious ideas. For this panel the distinguished art historian Thomas Crow, author…

Bus Tour to Wil-im-ee Moor-ing (Mount William greenstone quarry, Lancefield): Open Spatial Workshop – Converging in time

Join Open Spatial Workshop (Terri Bird, Bianca Hester and Scott Mitchell) and guests on a bus tour to the important Wurundjeri heritage site of Wil-im-ee Moor-ing (Mount William greenstone quarry) near Lancefield in regional Victoria. For thousands of years Aboriginal people quarried greenstone (volcanic diorite) from Wil-im-ee Moor-ing/Mount William to make the hatchet heads for their axes. The quarry was the centre of an extraordinary trading network that extended 700 kilometres into New South Wales as well as into South Australia. In 1882 and 1884 Wurundjeri elder William Barak witnessed the final operations of the quarry, describing aspects of its custodial control to anthropologist, Alfred Howitt. On 23rd October 2012, the land title of the Wil-im-ee Moor-ing/Mount William quarry was handed back to Kulin elders and is now under  the  control  of  the Wurundjeri Tribe Land Cultural Heritage Council.More info here:https://www.monash.edu/muma/events/2017/osw-bus-tour Saturday 11 March 2017, 10:00am-5:00pm Pick up:…

Talk | Stray: Adrift in the Anthropocene – Barbara Creed | Power Institute

The Power Institute is pleased to invite you to a book launch and a talk by Barbara Creed, Stray: Human–Animal Ethics in the Anthropocene. Barbara Creed’s timely polemic Stray explores the relationship between human and animal in the context of the stray. To celebrate the launch this new Power Polemics title, Creed will be presenting a lecture exploring the concept of the stray through the visual arts, film and literature, introducing the concept of the anthropogenic stray and exploring the contradictions it embodies. LECTURE ABSTRACT A stray, to stray, the act of straying The stray is the outsider, other, exile, refugee—the one who lives apart from the mainstream or isolated in foreign lands. The idea of straying offers an unusual but rich concept with which to think about the shared animal–human condition and the possible fate of the earth and…

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love

Melbourne Masterclass: Objects, Sounds and Stories of Love Wednesdays 12, 19, and 26 April, 6.00pm-8.30pm Love, a complex emotion to say the least, has inspired artists and creative practitioners for centuries, generating countless artworks, objects, poems, books, musical compositions and films. Over three weeks this masterclass will explore the materiality, visions and sounds of love in response to the exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400-1800 held at the National Gallery of Victoria (March 31- June 18 2017); a collaborative project produced with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne. Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800 draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe. While popular conceptions of love tend to focus upon romantic love, Love: Art of…

Symposium | Mutable Truths -Perspectives on Philippine Contemporary Art Practice | Castlemaine

Mutable Truths -Perspectives on Philippine Contemporary Art Practice Artists – Poklong Anading, Martha Atienza, Lyle Buencamino, Charles Buenconsejo, Buen Calubayan, Marina Cruz, Kawayan de Guia, Leeroy New, Mark Salvatus, Ronald Ventura A decade-long partnership of reciprocal arts residencies between Ateneo de Manila University, through Ateneo Art Gallery, and La Trobe University is being celebrated during the 2017 Castlemaine State Festival. Featuring a group exhibition of contemporary Filipino visual art Mutable Truths at La Trobe University’s Visual Arts Centre in Bendigo and a temporary installation at the Castlemaine Art Museum, La Puerta del Laberinto by Leeory New, this unique project is also the focus for a visual art symposium. All 10 exhibiting artists will participate in the symposium at the Castlemaine Art Museum, providing rare and inspiring insights into contemporary Filipino art. Venue: Phee Broadway Theatre, 14 Lyttleton Street, Castlemaine Date: Friday…

Talk | Thomas Crow in conversation with Anne Dunlop and Charles Green: Theological Originality in Art?

Date: Friday 10 Mar 2017, 6.00- 7.30pm Venue: Ian Potter Museum of Art, Swanston St, University of Melbourne Join Thomas Crow, Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art, and Associate Provost for the Arts, New York University in conversation with The University of Melbourne’s Anne Dunlop, Herald Chair in Fine Arts and Charles Green, Professor of Contemporary Art, for the launch of Professor Crow’s most recent publication, No Idols: The Missing Theology of Art. Thomas Crow’s research interests are both wide, spanning the 18th century to contemporary art, and deep. He has been a leader in reformulating art history and its research over recent decades. No Idols focuses on the inescapably linked but nonetheless distinct areas of art, theology and religion which, seeks to recover the theological import in the work of Sister Mary Corita Kent and five other essential artists…