Author: Katrina Grant

The Reluctant Master: A symposium to honour the life and work of Romaldo Giurgola

The Reluctant Master A symposium to honour the life and work of Romaldo Giurgola Through his professional practice, writings and teaching, Romaldo Giurgola (1920 – ) has been a formidable participant in the international architectural discourse for over 60 years. This symposium provides an opportunity to reflect upon the many facets of this long career and its impact on the discipline. This is a free public symposium. Please register on the Melbourne School of Design website here. Date: Saturday August 20th, 2011 9:00am – 6:15pm Venue: The Oratory, Newman College, 887 Swanston Street, The University of Melbourne, Parkville Symposium Programme 09:00 Professor Paolo Tombesi, University of Melbourne ‘Introduction: (Rom)Aldo’ ROME 09:20 Chair: Dr Flavia Marcello, Deakin University 09:30 Professor Stephen Frith, University of Canberra –  ‘Aldo and Rome: The early years’ 10:00 Dr Riccardo Vannucci, FAREstudio Architects, Rome – ‘Aldo…

Sugden Fellow Lecture: Associate Professor Jill Carrick – The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France

Sugden Fellow Lecture The Past in the Present: Art in 1960s France Associate Professor Jill Carrick From the realistic laden tables of 17th Century Dutch still-lives to contemporary works of art that feature found objects and trash, artists have sought to depict vividly the material objects we use in everyday life. This lecture examines the found-object sculptures of two 1960s artists working in France—Daniel Spoerri and Arman—and explores the intriguing dialogue between past and present enacted in their works. Themes addressed in this lecture include memory and amnesia, postwar modernization, and consumerism. Jill Carrick is Associate Professor in Art History at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. She writes on French post-war art, and her publications include the first book in English on the 1960s group Nouveau Réalisme or ‘New Realism’. She is visiting Melbourne as the Sugden Fellow at Queen’s College…

Talk: Modernism as a Local Phenomenon: The Art of Artur Barrio and Helio Oiticica – María Elena Lucero

Modernism as a Local Phenomenon: The Art of Artur Barrio and Helio Oiticica María Elena Lucero Visiting Argentinian art theorist María Elena Lucero presents a paper on influential Brazilian artists Artur Barrio and Helio Oiticica in relation to recent ‘decolonial’ thinking in Latin America. In this, she tracks a particular local modernism that drew its materials from the margins. She references the tropicalia movement, which endures as a quintessential southern way of thinking and creating. Her paper reflects a ‘decolonial aesthetics’, as found in Latin American writers such as Ramón Grosfoguel and Walter Mignolo. Director of CETCACL (Centre of Critical Theoretical Studies of Art and Culture in Latin America), Universidad Nacional de Rosario. She has published widely on Latin American art movements and artists, including Eugenio Dittborn, Cildo Merilles and Adriana Varejão. She has also written widely on pre-Columbian cultures.…

Wendy Stavrianos in Conversation about ‘Fragments of Memories’

Wendy Stavrianos in Conversation LUMA curator Alana O’Brien talks to Wendy Stavrianos about the personal, environmental and literary influences informing her giant sculptural drawings produced in the 1970s. Following the discussion visitors are invited to enjoy afternoon tea with Wendy and LUMA staff. Date: 2-3pm Friday, 12th August. Venue: LUMA Latrobe University Museum of Art Enquiries: 03 9479 2111 or www.latrobe.edu.au/LUMA About the Exhibition FRAGMENTS OF MEMORIES In recent times there has been growing use of craft ‘technologies’, frequently those traditionally considered female’s craft, in the service of artists. Wendy Stavrianos should be considered among the pioneers of such art in the Australian context. In the 1970s Stavrianos was living in Darwin, which she experienced both pre- and post-Cyclone Tracy. In this exotic and sensual environment Stavrianos recorded her experiences of the landscape, feminine energy, and the personal in detailed…

Lecture: Reconstructing an Iconographical Program of the Palace of Nestor at Pylos: New Wall Paintings and Their Interpretation

Reconstructing an Iconographical Program of the Palace of Nestor at Pylos: New Wall Paintings and Their Interpretation Professor Jack Davis, University of Cincinnati Hosted by the Archaeological Institute at Athens, Classical Association of Victoria & The School of Historical & Philosophical Studies The Bronze Age ‘Palace of Nestor’ at Pylos, originally excavated by Carl Blegen in the 1950s, is unique in allowing investigators to consider its wall-paintings in context. In a great many instances it is possible to restore the entire iconographical program of decoration in a room or in an architectural complex. The discovery in 1995 of some 50,000 unpublished fragments of wall-paintings has resulted in the reconstruction of entirely new iconographical scenes and has contributed greatly to our knowledge of Bronze Age style and the technology of painting. Jack L. Davis is Carl W. Blegen Professor of Greek…

Symposium: Print Matters at the Baillieu

Print Matters at the Baillieu Free One Day Symposium inspired by the Baillieu Library Print Collection Saturday 3rd September, 2011 Keynote speaker: Professor Sasha Grishin, Australian National University The Baillieu Library Print Collection includes some 8,000 prints – mostly etchings, engravings, mezzotints, lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings – that date from the fifteenth century to the twentieth. It is based on the gift of some 3,700 Old Master prints donated by Dr J. Orde Poynton in 1959 and which was further enhanced in 1964 with Harold Wright’s gift of half his Lionel Lindsay print collection and prints by his British contemporaries. The collection is principally for teaching and learning; a number of scholars had their first encounter with prints at the Baillieu Library and later emerged in print related institutions and projects such as those offered by the Harold Wright…

Art History Seminar Program at the University of Melbourne

Art History Seminar Programme School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne Program for Semester 2, 2011 Time: Wednesdays, 1 pm- 2 pm Venue: Room 114 John Medley (West Tower) August 3 Monique Webber (University of Melbourne) – Meditantibus Escam: Critical Discourse and the Creation of Innocentine Rome August 17 José Antonio González Zarandona (University of Melbourne) – The destruction of heritage: Rock art in the Burrup Peninsula August 31 Justine Grace (University of Melbourne) – l’avanguardia cattolica: Fillia and the forgotten church of futurism September 14 Professor Jaynie Anderson (University of Melbourne) – CIHA or the International Committee for the History of Art and making world art history October 5 Professor John Clark (University of Sydney) – Ono Tadashige and Japanese avant-garde print movements of the 1930s October 12 Assoc. Professor Jill Carrick (Carleton University) For further information…

Three New Exhibitions at MUMA

Three New Exhibitions at MUMA The Monash University Museum of Art has three new exhibitions opening this Thursday, 4th August: Juan Davila – The Devil had a Daughter – Collected Collaborations. Also see details of public programs for each exhibition. All events free entry. Bookings essential: muma@monash.edu or 03 9905 4217. For further details and additional public programs see www.monash.edu.au/muma/events. Opening function With opening remarks at 4.00pm by Shane Carmody, Director, Collections and Access, State Library of Victoria. Date: Saturday 13 August 2011 3-5pm. Venue: Monash Museum of Art, located on the ground floor of Building F at Monash University, Caulfield Campus Exhibition 1 Juan DavilaThe Moral Meaning of Wilderness Exhibition Dates: 4 August – 1st October The Moral Meaning of Wilderness features recent work by Juan Davila, one of Australia’s most distinguished artists. The exhibition sees Davila turn to the genres of landscape…

Art History Fellowships 2012-2013 at The Met, New York

Art History Fellowships 2012-2013 at The Met The Metropolitan Museum of Art offers annual resident fellowships in art history to qualified graduate students at the predoctoral level as well as to postdoctoral researchers. Projects should relate to the Museum’s collections. The fields of research for art history candidates include Asian art, arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, antiquities, arms and armor, costumes, drawings, illuminated manuscripts, paintings, photographs, prints, sculpture, textiles, and Western art. Some art history fellowships for travel abroad are also available for students whose projects involve firsthand examination of paintings in major European collections. The application deadline for art history fellowships awarded for the 2012–2013 year is November 4, 2011. Please note that not all fellowships are open to international scholars. It would be advisable to contact The Met before applying to check your eligibility. If applicants have…

Visiting Fellowships 2012-2013 – University of Oxford, All Souls College

Visiting Fellowships 2012-2013 University of Oxford – All Souls College, Oxford The College proposes to elect a number of Visiting Fellows, for periods of one, two, or three terms, in the academic year October 2012 to June 2013. These Fellowships are intended to enable their holders to carry out study and research in Oxford and to participate in the academic life of the College and the University. Visiting Fellowships are open in all subjects. Applications will be considered from staff of any university or other institution of higher learning, from other suitably qualified persons who wish to carry out full-time scholarly work in Oxford, and from those in public life (e.g. law, public policy, or the arts). In making its final choice, the College will give weight to intellectual quality, to the interest and feasibility of the research project, and…

Floor Talk: Sir Thomas Lawrence’s George IV of England

Floor Talk: Sir Thomas Lawrence’s George IV of England Speaker Helen Gill, Hugh D.T. Williamson Foundation Paintings Conservation, NGV Following conservation treatment in 2010, this portrait is currently on display for the first time in many years. Join us to hear how the conservation treatment has revived the previously damaged painting, uncovering fine and well articulated brushwork, restoring it to displayable condition and informing the reattribution. Date: Friday 12th August, 12:30pm. Venue: NGV International 180 St Kilda Road, meet at Information Desk Website: http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/whats-on/programs/public-programs/floor-talk-sir-thomas-lawrences-george-iv-fo-england

Conversation: The NGV Story

The NGV Story Join us for an ‘in conversation’ between NGV Director Gerard Vaughan and the author of The NGV Story publication, Phip Murray. Learn more about the 150- year history of the NGV as they discuss some of the great stories documented in the publication. The book will be available for sale and there will also be an opportunity for book signing. About the Book Phip Murray, The NGV Story, Publisher: National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. ISBN: 9780724103393 (paperback), Published: May 2011, $29.95 paperback (AUD) The NGV Story brings together the great stories and events from the National Gallery of Victoria’s 150‐year history. This unique and entertaining publication celebrates the  significant occasions from the NGV’s past, be they momentous, subversive or amusing. A detailed, chronological narrative charts the life of the NGV from 1861 to 2011, highlighting the people…

CFP: Between Scylla and Charybdis: European Courts and Court Residences Outside Habsburg and Valois/Bourbon Territories, 1500-1700

Between Scylla and Charybdis: European Courts and Court Residences Outside Habsburg and Valois/Bourbon Territories, 1500-1700 Deadline:  31 October 2011 Copenhagen and Hillerød, Denmark 30 April-2 May 2012 As is well known, the rivalry between Spain‐Austria and France, or, more precisely, between the Habsburg and the Valois/Bourbon monarchies, was a factor of major importance in international court life during the 16th and 17th centuries. The age‐old quarrels between the nations involved about their seniority and precedence forced each to create distinctive characteristics, including courtly etiquette, ceremonies, and the architectural setting of court life. The ‘satellite’ courts, related to these ‘superpowers’, might visually expose their loyalty to a specific faction by following the system of codes of its ‘leader’. But what were the strategies of the independent, though less dominant European courts beyond the Habsburg and Valois/Bourbon spheres? How did they respond to…

Symposium: Vienna 1900 – Dress rehearsal for modernity

Symposium: Vienna 1900 – Dress rehearsal for modernity Vienna: Art & Design Speakers William M. Johnston, academic; Prof Jennifer Shaw, Pro Vice-Cancellor & Dean, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of New England; Assoc Prof Alison Inglis, Art History, The University of Melbourne; Dr John Carmody, School of Medical Sciences, Physiology, Convenor: ‘ Medicine and Music’, University of Sydney; Dr Edwin Harari, Assoc Prof Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne; Dr Vivien Gaston, Guest Curator, NGV & Honorary Research Fellow, The University of Melbourne; Amanda Dunsmore, Curator Arts & Antiquities, NGV; Sophie Matthiesson, Curator, International Art, NGV; Dr Matthew Martin, Assistant Curator, Decorative Arts, NGV; Elizabeth Cross, Senior Researcher, International Art, NGV This Symposium will explore the themes, developments and influences of an extraordinary period that saw the birth of the modern world, including, art, culture, design, architecture, literature, science, social…

Lecture: ‘Feeling Stone’ Jeffrey Jerome Cohen

‘Feeling Stone’ Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (George Washington University) Our vocabulary for stone is impoverished. We describe rock as dumb, mute, unfeeling, unyielding, recalcitrant. Stone can sometimes be invoked as a witness, but most often its testimony is silent, an unfeeling trigger to affect, a passive reminder of tragic human histories. This talk excavates a lithic counter-tradition: stone not simply as a spur to human emotion, but as a lively substance possessed of agency, motility, artistry and possibly even a soul. Surveying work by medieval and contemporary thinkers, from Albertus Magnus and Geoffrey of Monmouth to Gilles Deleuze, Elizabeth Grosz and Roger Caillois, I argue that stone invites us to anonanthropocentric approach of ecologies, landscapes, texts and art. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen is Professor of English and Director of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute (MEMSI) at the George Washington University. He received his BA from…